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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1  Lange, Gustav Friedrich (I94)
 
2  Family F981
 
3 In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Mary is married to Walter C. Brewer. She is a 38 (?) year old, white, female. She has been married for 18 years, has one living child. She was born in Missouri of parents who were both born in Alabama. She speaks, reads, and writes English. She is a housewife, working on her own account. She lives in Hot Springs Township, Garland County, Arkansas. [WWB 03.]
In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, ???? Brewer is a white, married, 45 year old female. She reads, writes, and speaks English She was born in Missouri of parents who were both born in Alabama. She has no occupation. She lives with her husband in Hot Springs township, Garland County, Arkansas. [I believe she is the same Mary of the 1910 census because the birth information is the same. I cannot read the first name well. Until proven otherwise, I hypothesize that the wife of W. C. Brewer in this census is the same as in the 1910 census.] [WWB 04.] 
Staner, Mary (I2562)
 
4        In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Luverne L. Lange is a six year old, white, single female. She is in school. She was born in Wisconsin of parents who were also born in Wisconsin. She speaks English. She lives with her parents, "Kuno" and Bertha, and a brother, Roy, in Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [CGL 01.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, LuVerne L. Lange is a 17 year old, white, single female. She is no longer in school, but she reads, writes, and speaks English. She has no employ outside of school. LuVerne lives with her parents, Bertha and Kuno, and three siblings: Conroy R., Elaine E. and David E. Lange. The family lives in Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [CGL 04.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, LuVerne L. Lange Schumacher is a 27 year old, white, married female. She is married to Vernon Schumacher. She is not in school or college, but has completed three years of high school. She was born in Wisconsin. She is living in the same house in which she lived in 1935. And, she is living on a farm. He occupation is that of housework. She is working at home. LuVerne is living with her husband Vernon and two of their children, Leonard and Valeria. The family lives in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [SVJ 05.] 
Lange, LuVerne L. (I290)
 
5        In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Roy R. Lange is about four years of age. He was born in Wisconsin of parents who were also born in Wisconsin. He lives with his parents, "Kuno" and Bertha, and one sister, Luverne, in Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [CGL 01.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Roy (Conroy) R. Lange is a 14 year old, white, single male. He is still attending school. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He was born in Wisconsin of parents who were both born in Wisconsin. Roy has no employ outside the home. He lives with his parents, Bertha and Kuno, and three siblings: LuVerne L., Elaine E., and David E. Lange. The family lives in Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [CGL 04.]
 
Lange, Roy R. (I291)
 
6 "For many years [John] was engaged quite extensively in the business of quarrying soapstone at Cambridge, VT. As early as 1844, when only 24, he was a delegate from Vermont to the convention which nominated Henry Clay for president. Since then he has filled various and many offices of trust and honor. Devotedly attached to his native State and town, he has served them faithfully in both branches of the State Legislature." [BP 01; 65.] Resident of Grafton, VT. Butterfield, John Lewis (I844)
 
7 "He had int. Scituate 20 June 1734 to Elizabeth Turner, but as he died 22 August 1734, the marriage prob. never occurred." [RT 02.] Tilden, Nathaniel (I1074)
 
8 "On 5 Feb. 1733 (sic - 1734) Nathaniel Tilden and James Litchfield, both of Scituate were appointed administrators of the estate of Nathaniel Tilden, late of Scituate. On 1 Sept. 1735 Joseph Bailey and Ruth Tilden, both of Scituate were appointed administrators as son Nathaniel Tilden and son-in-law Lechfield are deceased. The account of Joseph Bailey and Ruth Tilden was allowed 3 Sept. 1744." [RT 02.] Tilden, Nathaniel (I1069)
 
9 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1176)
 
10                      OBITUARY, ROBERT SPENCER BREWER
       "Robert S. Brewer, 73 of Pine, Arizona, passed away at his home on July 10, 2008. Memorial Services will be July 16, 2008 at the Mulberry Center Church at the Wilson Brewer Park in Webster City at 1:00 p.m.
       Robert was born November 14, 1934 in Webster City, Iowa. He was the son of Frank and Gladys (Jameson) Brewer. He received his education in the Webster City School System, graduating in 1953. He attended the University of Iowa for 1 year after graduating high school.
       Robert married Elizabeth (Betty) Schott, August 20, 1953 at Elkhart, Indiana. To this union 4 children joined them. Son, Francis (Frank); daughters, Karen, Lynn, and Melissa. They later divorced. He then married Kay Weaver October 14, 1974. They operated a dairy farm in Huggins, Missouri. Kay has 2 children. Steve Perry, Sherry (Cricket). They later divorced. He then married Beth Knight November 17, 1990. Beth has a son Andy. They resided in Phoenix, Arizona and then Pine, Arizona where they were enjoying retirements.
       Robert enjoyed working with animals. He had registered dairy goats and Jersey dairy cows when he lived in Iowa. He and his family took the dairy goats to the Iowa State Fair and the Waterloo Cattle Congress for several years where several of the goats received Grand Champion and blue ribbon awards.
       Robert was a plasterer for several years. He learned the trade from his father. He often stated, "I'm a jack of all trades, master of none." He had many talents in the home construction industry. He also worked for Maudlin Construction and Modern Farms.
       Robert is survived by his wife, Beth Brewer. Children Francis (Frank) (Michelle) of Webster City, Karen Brewer (Nathan Scott Heidick) of Duncombe, Lynne Brinkman of Webster City, Melissa (Terry) Kreitzer of Keystone, Nebraska. Sister Ruth Hinderks. Grandchildren, Kristine and Joel Anderson, Jennifer (Jared ) Knot, Jason and Alyn Brewer, Aaron and Sarah Brinkman and Tyler Kreutzer. Great Grandchildren, Trevor and Tayea Knott, Brianna Alrn and Emma Brewer, Jalyn Brewer, Shyann Brinkman and Matthew Boade.
       Robert was preceded in death by his parents, sister, Ruby Brewer and Ellen Peterson; brother, Hebert Brewer.
       A scholarship fund will be set up for the grandchildren and great grandchildren in his name." [RSB 01.] 
Brewer, Robert Spencer (I1323)
 
11               From a Bio on FIND A GRAVE:
       Ernst Raatz was born in Grabionne, Kreis Wirsitz, Posen, Prussia and emigrated to the US in 1866 or 1867, settling first in Ripon, Wisconsin and Marrying August Krienke, then moving to the August, Wisconsin area a couple years later.
       In the Hamburger Passenger listing, Ernest Raatz information is given as follows (My Translation - DLL):
Name: Ernst Raatz
Gender: Male
Departure Age: 32
Occupation: Worker
Birth Date: Abt. 1831
Residence: Grabionne, Preußen (Germany)
Departure Date: 3 Oct 1863
Port of Departure; Hamburg
Port of Arrival: New York City
Ship Name: Old Dominion
Captain: Stahl
Shipping Clerk: Donati & Co.
Shipping Line: Wilhelm Ludwig Stahl
Ship Type: Sailing Vessel
Accommodation: Without information [REJ 02.]
Volume: 373-7 I, VIII A 1 Band 017
       In the 1870 U. S. Federal Census, Ernest J. Raatz is a 37 year old, white, male. He was born in Prussia of parents who were also both born in Prussia. He reads, writes and probably speaks English. His work is that of farm laborer. He lives with his wife, Augusta, and a daughter, Emily [Emma) on the farm of John Radtke in Brunswick Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [REJ 03.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Ernest J. Raatz is a 47 year old, white married male. He is a day laborer. He was born in Prussia of parents who were also both born in Prussia. He lives with his wife, Augusta, and two daughters, Emma and Lena. The family lives in Bridge Creek Township, Eau Claire County Wisconsin. [REJ 04.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Ernest J. Raatz is a 68 year old, married male. He was born June 1831. Ernest is married to Augusta and has been so married for 36 years. The year of marriage was 1864. He was born in Germany to parents who were also both born in Germany. Ernest came to the United States in 1863 and has lived here for 36 years. Papers for naturalization have been submitted. Ernest is a day laborer. but has not been employed for 12 months. He reads, writes, and speaks English. Ernest owns his own home, free and clear of a mortgage. It is not a farm. He lives with his wife, Augusta, in Augusta, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [REJ 05.]
       In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Ernest J. Raatz is a 76 year old, white, married male. He was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany. It appears that he owns his home free and clear of any mortgage. Ernest lives with his wife, Augusta in the town of Augusta, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [REJ 06.]



 
Raatz, Ernest Johann (I3002)
 
12               Hazel B. "Bird" Olson Teeples
       Hazel B. "Bird" Teeples, 90 of Black River Falls died Monday, Nov. 8 2010, in Black Rover Memorial hospital under the care of Black River Memorial Hospice.
       Hazel Birdine Olson was born July 12 1920 in Black River Falls to Julius and Ida (Bremer) Olson. She was raised in Black River Falls and graduated from Black River Falls high School. Throughout her schooling, she maintained nearly perfect attendance. She was truly devastated to have to miss some of her high school days because of acute appendicitis.
       Bird became employed as a nurse's aid at the Krohn Clinic and Hospital during high school and following her graduation.
       She married Robert W. Teeples Aug. 29, 1945, in Clinton, IA. Bob and Bird lived in Black River Falls until 1959 when they moved to Madison where they lived for seven years. They later lived in Wausau for seven years until returning to Black River Falls in 1974.
       Bird was a member of the Black River Falls Evangelical Lutheran church and the Thompson-RedCloud VFW Post 1959 Auxiliary Unit.
       She enjoyed gardening, watching "Wheel of Fortune," listening to "Buy Line" on WWIS radio, clipping coupons, saving things, feeding and watching song birds. She was fond of all sports, especially baseball.
       Survivors include her husband Bob; four sons, John Teeples of Hixton, Tom (Teresa Teeples of Black River Falls, Colonel Dave (Sue) Teeples (W. S. Army) of Lithia, FL, and Bill (Jolene) Teeples of Black River Falls; 10 Grandchildren, Todd Teeples, Jason Ott, Tyrone Teeples, Dan (Jenny) Teeples, First Lieutenant Amy Teeples (US Army), Josh Teeples, Cassandra (Joseph) Backaus, Steve Teeples, Jennie Teeples, and Christina Teeples; six great-grandchildren, Holly Ott, Kaylee Ott, gracee Ott, Riley Teeples, J. T. Teeples-Coplien, and Braylon Backaus; and numerous other relatives and friends.
       She was preceded in death by her parents, Julius and Ida Olson; a son, Bobby Teeples; two grandsons, Brian and Tony Teeples, two brothers, Harold and Ronald "Bucky" Olson; and a sister, Marguerite Severson.
       Funeral Services were held at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 12, 2010, at the Evangelical Lutheran Church, and burial was in Riverside Cemetery both in Black River Falls. Rev. Eric Bakken officiated.
       Family members and friends were invited for visitation from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at Evangelical Lutheran Church.
       Memorials may be given to Evangelical Lutheran Church, Jackson County Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers, Blach River Memorial Hospice or the Dialysis Unite of Black River Memorial Hospital.
       The Buswell Funeral Home, Black River Falls, assisted the family with arrangements.
       Online condolences are available at www.buswellfuneralhome.com.  
Olson, Hazel Birdine (I451)
 
13               OBITUARY
       Allman E. "Al" "Almy" Burrows, 91, of Eau Claire, WI, died peacefully on Monday, September 19, 2011, at Dove Healthcare West in Eau Claire.
       He was born on March 13, 1920, on the family farm in Monroe County, WI, to William and Hilda (Hoffman) Burrows. He graduated from Wilton High School.
       On April 12, 1947, he married Phyllis Lange at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Fairchild, WI. they made their home in Eau Claire where Al worked at the paper mill for 40 years. His passion was working with wood and building furniture, which continued after his retirement.
       Allman is survived by his wife of 64 years, Phyllis; children, Larry (Nancy) Burrows of Eau Claire, Diane (John) Merritt of Eau Claire, Debra (Michael) Walter of Eau Claire, and Tom (Amy) Burrows of Janesville, WI: daughter-in-law, Kristine (Brian) Fenner of Wisconsin Rapids, WI; grandchildren, Cassie (John) Chrystal, Nicolas and Todd Burrows, Zachary, Luke and Joe Merritt, Jessica (Adam) Partlow, Melanie Walter, Morgan Winter, and Bryan and Ethan Burrows; sister, Lillian Sonnenburg of Mt. Horeb, WI; brother, Harold Burrows (special friend, Alice Gearing) of Fairchild, WI; sister-in-law, Loris Schlegelmilch; and many nieces; nephews; relatives and friends.
       He was preceded in death by his parents; son, Terry Burrows; grandson, Craig Burrows; sister, Ruth (Gilbert) Friske; brother-in-law, Ervin Sonnenburg; infant brother, Ronald Burrows; parents-in-law, Arthur and Alma Lange; and brother-in-law, Donald Schlegelmilch Sr.
       Funeral Services will be on Thursday, September 22, 2011, at 11 a.m. at Epiphany Lutheran Church, 3031 Epiphany Lane in Eau Claire, with Pastor Russell Kampfer officiating.
       Visitation will be on Wednesday, September 21, 2011, from 4 to 7 p.m. at Lenmark-Gomsrud-Linn Funeral Home West Chapel, 1405 N. Clairemont Ave., Eau Claire, and also one hour prior to services at the church on Thursday.
       Burial will be at Rest Haven Cemetery in the Town of Washington.
       The family would like to thank the staff at Dove Healthcare West and Mayo Health Systems Home and Hospice for their care for Allman.
 
Burrows, Allman Edwin (I139)
 
14               Obituary - Lawrence Olsen
       Larry Olsen, 70, Merrill, died Wednesday March 17, 2010, unexpectedly at home. He was born October 22, 1939 in Black river Falls to the late Einer and Lorraine (Thur) Olsen. He graduated from Fairchild High School, UW-River Falls, and Northwestern University. Larry married Mary Clark in Augusta on August 15, 1970.
       Larry was a math teacher and basketball coach at D. C. Everest for 19 years. After Teaching, Larry decided to follow his passion, dairy farming, for the next 16 years.
       In retirement he continued to raise cattle, crop the land, and develop the Country View Subdivision. Larry was a sports enthusiast - from coaching Little League, playing basketball and golf, to being an avid fan of Wisconsin sin sports teams. He as truly content and enjoyed all the little things in life.
       Survivors include his loving wife, Mary of Merrill, his son, Steven (Kristin) Olsen of Mosinee, his daughters, Sarah (Brian) Grose of North St. Paul, MN, Lynn (Marlo)Krueger of Marathon, two granddaughters, Vanessa and Ava Krueger (they were the apple of his eye, three brothers, Norman (Barb (Olsen of Green Bay, Orville and Donald (Colleen) Olsen all of Fairchild, two sisters, Nancy Olsen of Altoona, Marie (Greg) Gross of Loveland, CO, and nieces, nephews, and cousins.
       Funeral services will be at 3:00 p.m. Saturday, March 20, 2010 at Faith Lutheran Church, town of Maine. Reverend Kevin Hoogland will officiate. Entombment will be in Memorial Chapel Mausoleum at Restlawn Memorial Park [Wisconsin Rapids, WI, near Black River Falls, WI.]. Visitation will be Saturday from 1:00 p.m. until the time of services at the church. Helke Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements. You may sign our family guest book at helke.com. [LaO 01.]
 
Olsen, Lawrence Einer (I504)
 
15               Obituary for Betty Seadin Charette
Born in Seattle, Washington on Apr. 8, 1923
Departed on Nov. 24, 2003 and resided in Aberdeen, WA.
Visitation: Friday, Nov. 28, 2003
Service: Saturday, Nov. 29, 2003
       Betty Charette, a lifelong resident of Aberdeen, died Monday, November 24, 2003 at Cascade Vista Convalescent Center in Redmond. She was 80. She was born April 8, 1923 in Seattle to Nils Verner and Olga (Purtilo)Seadin. She graduated from Weatherwax High School class of 1940 and went on to earn her Associate Degree from Grays Harbor College. On January 5, 1946 she married Rober Charette in Aberdeen. He died in 1988.
       Mrs. Charette had worked at the National Bank of Commerce in Aberdeen. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Aberdeen; P. E. O.; Questors and she also volunteered at the clothing bank. Mrs. Charette enjoyed playing bridge, quilting, needlepoint and traveling. She loved books and reading and was proud of her Finnish and Swedish heritage. Mrs. Charette is survived by her daughters, Emily (Trent) Lowe of Salt Lake City, Utah, Julie (Taddeusz) Charette Nunn of Whidby Island, Wash and Nancy (Greg) Gale of Bellevue, Wash and three grandchildren, Erik and Alex Lowe and Joey Gale.
       Visitation will be held from 1:00-4:00 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 28 and from 9:00-11:00 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 29 at Whiteside Family Mortuary in Aberdeen. A Memorial Service will begin at 12:00 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 29 at the First Presbyterian Church in Aberdeen. Memorial Donations may be made to the Robert L. Charette scholarship Fund at Aberdeen High School. [BS 01.]  
Seadin, Betty (I2475)
 
16        (Clair Brewer, as he was known all his life, is represented in these notes and in this compilation as Alten Clair Brewer, his full name. Family Tree Maker asks for the full name and uses it. In these notes, where possible, I have used the name by which is most familiar to his family, Clair. When the name does not appear as Clair, it is because I have copied something from a source that uses the full name. I apologize for the use of the full name or the name Alten when it is not under my control.)
       Nedra Brewer Adams writes in the History of Hamilton County, Iowa [1986]: "Clair [Brewer] married Margaret Stuart and has two daughters and three granddaughters who live in California. After Margaret's death, Clair married Nell Garland and the couple are co-authors of twelve or more school text books. Their retirement home is in Missouri." [EWB 05.]
       From , Fletchall, Mrs. Charles B. "Smith, Isaac Family," [F611] in The History of Hamilton County, Iowa: 1985. Dallas: Curtis Media, 1986 [ACB 02], the following was written about Alten:
       "Alten Clair Brewer, graduated from Webster City High School in 1931, received his B.A. degree from William Jewell College, MO, 1936; M.S. degree from the University of Arkansas, 1955; and Doctorate in Education degree from the University of Tennessee, 1960. He was a science teacher and track coach at various schools in Arkansas and Missouri from 1938-1955; elementary principal at Springfield, MO, 1955-1960, Science Coordinator of the Springfield Public Schools, 1960-1983, and Assistant Superintendent in Charge of Science with a bi-weekly public television show. [ACB 03.] He has won several citations and awards during his teaching career. He is the author of numerous publications on science and aviation (he was a physics instructor and Ground School Flight Instructor at William Jewell College during war years, 1943-45). He co-authored a science textbook for grades 1-6 with his wife, Nell Garland Brewer. They are now retired, living near Springfield, MO. Clair and his first wife, Margaret Stuart (deceased 1977), were the parents of two daughters, Patricia Louise and Maila Jean, both living in California."
       According to his obituary [ACB 01], Clair, as he was known, "held positions as president of the Council for Elementary Science International, director of the National Science Supervisors Commission, president for the Southwest Missouri Teachers Association, and was a member of Sigma Pi Sigma, and Phi Delta Kappa. He receive the Grade Teachers Award for Teaching Excellence in science and mathematics and the Missouri Science Education Award. He was also a coach of track (his favorite), basketball and football. His daughter, Patricia, says that "he was good at it." [MS 02.]
       Some of the same information from the "Smith, Isaac Family" article and from the obituary are repeated and added to in the Who's Who in the Midwest articles, prepared by Clair. Brewer himself.
       He was a member of the Kimberling City Lions Club and the Solomon Masonic Lodge.
       Clair is survived by two daughters, Maila Brewer Harrell and Patricia Brewer; granddaughters Maila Wong and Monica Wong Krupa in Pennsylvania in the medical profession and Ancelin Wong, San Francisco Bay area; great grandchildren Jessica Krupa, John Krupa, Lucas Krupa, Seth Krupa and Gavin Krupa; and, Jason Buchholtz in Pennsylvania. [ACB 03.] [PB 02.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Alten C. Brewer is a 6 year old, white, single male. He is not in school and probably does not control all aspects of the English language to say that he reads, writes, and speaks it. He was born in Iowa of parents who were both born in Iowa. He lives with his parents, Edward and Emma, a sister, Nedra, a cousin, Floyd S. Pierce, and his grandparents, Isaac and Maila Smith, in Independence Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [EWB 06.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Clair Alten Brewer is a 15 year old, white, single male. he was born in Iowa of parents who were both born in Iowa. He is currently in school; he reads, writes, and speaks English. He has no employ outside the home. Clair lives with his parents, Edward and Emma and a sister Nedra A. Brewer. The family lives at 1521 Wilson Ave. in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [EWB 10.] 
Brewer, Alten Clair (I583)
 
17        A Welch Family family history was printed, May 26, 1991 [I would like to know the author - I have a suspicion that it is Barbara Jane Mize or Elsie Welch Rushia, but that suspicion needs confirmation. In any case, the entire documents will be reproduced in this compilation where it best fits.] It contains some important facts:
"Samuel Welch (c. 1798 - September 28, 1869 and [Elizabeth] Betsy Welch (?)
       European origins of and time of immigration of the Welches to the colonies or United States remain obscure. They may be descended from John Welch (1520-1568) of Coliston Dunfrieshire, Scotland. His family came from lower Scotland and had some connection with the Stuarts and John Knox. Many members of the family reportedly joined the clergy. No definite connection exists at this writing, but Elsie Welch Rushia believed that the Welches were of Scotch-Irish origin: i.e., related to the Scots who were transported to Northern Ireland in 1603 by James I.
       Very little is known of Samuel and Betsey Welch beyond what is available in the early census records. He was originally from Connecticut. In 1820, they lived in Elmira, Chemung County, New York. By the end of that decade, they were living in Erie County, Buffalo, New York where Bold Dighton was born July 17, 1828. They followed the westward movement into Ohio, settling on a farm in Wakeman, Huron County, Ohio prior to 1850." [DCW 01.]
       In the 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Samuel Welch is a 52 year old, married, male farmer, whose real estate is valued at $550. He was born in New York and is married to Elizabeth (Betsy). It appears, [although I cannot be certain from the way in which the information is presented] that two families are living together. There may be the following children of Elizabeth and Samuel: Oscar, Nehemiah, Alpheus, Betsy, Julia, Mary, and Russell. It appears that Russell is married to Louisa and that they have three children: Sarah, Louisa, Abner. In addition, there is an Elias Welch, 56, a farmer, who could be the brother of Samuel. Bold Dighton lives in the same area with a new wife, Anna, and no children. The Samuel Welch (and Russell Welch) family lives in Wakeman Township, Huron County, New York. [SW 01.] [If the wrong names are attached to Samuel and Elizabeth, I hope that someone will correct me. DLL.]
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Samuel Welch is a 60 year old, white, married male. He is a farmer whose real estate is valued at $2,400 and personal estate at $800. He was born in New York state. He is living in Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio, with his wife, Elizabeth (Betsy), one son (Russell who is dying), and three daughters (Betsy, Eunice-probably Julia, and Mary Ann). Alpheus, Louisa - the assumed wife of Russell - and Russell and Louisa's three children (Louisa, Sarah, Abner), and a child by the name of Marenda, live on a neighboring farm. [SW 02.] 
Welch, Samuel (I1650)
 
18        Abigail was 88 years, 1 month, and 25 days old upon her death. [AbgL 01.] Fuller, Abigail (I1952)
 
19        About the parish church at Fordington in the borough of Dorchester:
       Fordington, deriving its name from the ford over the river Frome, is a parish in the Union of Dorchester, Dorchester Division within the borough of Dorchester. the ancient parish church is a cruciform structure, partly of Norman and partly of English architecture.
       The parish church of Fordington was dedicated to St. George in 1505 and was anciently called the church of St. George in Dorchester. It is large and well built, and standing on rising ground, shows itself to much advantage at a great distance. It consists of a chancel, tiled (rebuilt 1750, by Mrs. Pitt the impropriator), a body, transept or cross aisle and a north aisle to the chancel, all covered with lead and compass-roofed. The tower is 80 feet high, adorned with battlements and pinnacles and contains five bells and a clock.
       Little remains of antiquity except the vestiges of a rude lift, near the chancel; and over the porch of the south door, rudely cared in stone the effigies of Saint George on horseback, armed with a lance, in combat; behind him are two figures kneeling, with hands uplifted. On the pulpit is this date 1592.
       The Bishops Transcripts of the ancient parish registers partially exist from 1577, but the parish register dates only from 1704. The living is a vicarage. [WSp 03.] 
Sprague, William (I1990)
 
20        According to Lee, J. W. History of Hamilton County Iowa. Chicago: J. S. Clarke, 1912; p. 47, Evaline McKowan was born shortly after the arrival of the McKowan family in Hamilton County: "In the Spring of 1855, Luther Lakin left home, intending to get married and meet his father and other settlers on the Skunk (River), but he arrived about two weeks earlier than the rest and can therefore lay just claim to being the first settler in the east part of the county and in Lyon township. About two weeks after his arrival Elisha Lakin, B. A. Lakin, and E. P. McCowan came and all settled near each other. The men turned in and helped Mr. McCowan to build a cabin, which was the first house built in that part of the county. McCowan moved into his new house and shortly afterwards Evaline McCowan was born, being the first white child born in the east half of the county.
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline McKowan is a four year old female, who was born in Iowa of Edward P. McKowan and Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan. She is living in Clear Lake township with E. P. McKowan and Emaline McKowan. Her mother, Lucinda Lakin McKowan passed away in 1857. She is approximately four years old. EPM 04.]
       In the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan is a 14 year old, white, single female, living with Edward P. McKowan and Emaline Whitney McKowan. She is living in Fremont Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. She was born in Iowa of a foreign born parent (Edward P. - Canada) and Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan (Pennsylvania). She lives with her parents and six step bothers and sisters (Emerline, Josephine, Thomas, Mary, Joseph, and Anna). She is at school. [EPM 05.]
       In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan is married to William Granville Brewer. She is a 23 year old, white, married female who is keeping house. She lives with her husband in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. With Eva and William are two children - Mabel and Edward. Eva was born in Iowa of parents who were both born in Illinois (not true - the father, Edward P. McKowan was born in New Brunswick, Canada - DLL.] [WGB 03.]
       In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Evaline McKowan Brewer is living in dwelling 78, family 84, in Cass Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [She is probably divorced from William G. Brewer, although the census indicates that she is married.; She didn't marry D.C. Welch until 1890.] She is living alone with her son Edward next to the Edward P. McKowan family. She works as a seamstress. [EPM 11.]
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline McKowan Brewer is married to Dighton Carlos Welch. She is living in Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa with her husband, three step daughters (Maude, Della, and Jessie) and a son (Earl G.). She has been married for ten years; she was born in September of 1853. According to this census, she has three living children. They would be Earl G. Welch, Mabel Brewer Pierce, and Edward Brewer. She was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Canada (Edward P. McKowan) and Illinois (Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan). She reads, writes and speaks English. [DCW 04.] 
McKowan, Evaline Elizabeth (I576)
 
21        According to Brewer-Bonebright and Bonebright-Closz [WGB 01], William Granville Brewer was named for W. G. Berkley, a lawyer who had located in Homer [Iowa]. According to Lee (Lee, J. W. History of Hamilton County Iowa, Volume 1. Chicago: S. J. Clarke, 1912; pp. 97, 274, 288), W. G. Berkley was a defense lawyer in several prominent cases in Hamilton County, as well as a Captain in Company F, Second Iowa Cavalry during the Civil War.
       There is no death date for William G. Brewer. The story that is told, and I have it in a letter from a granddaughter of William G. from a second marriage to Estelle Comley, Margaret Strachan, which goes as follows: "My mother related to me that her Dad had left to go on a cattle drive to Texas. He never returned. It was my understanding that they didn't know where in Texas." [MMS 01.] It appears that William G. Brewer never returned to Iowa. No one knows where or when he died. This is somewhat of a mystery. However, It is claimed that he died in 1910. The 1910 U. S. Federal Census for his wife, Harriet Estella Comley Brewer indicates that she is a widow. However since there appears to be no death record and no grave, certainly not in Webster City, where is he???
       In her 1985 article in the History of Hamilton County, Iowa, 1985, Nedra Brewer wrote the following about William Granville Brewer: " In February of 1853, William Granville Brewer was born and joined the other sons and daughters in hunting for the family food, plowing, planting, and doing all the things necessary to live off the land.
To the south and east of Newcastle were two other new communities, Lakins Grove and Homer. the latter was the larger and more enterprising, but the former is important in this family because it was the home of Evelyn McKowen. Evelyn and William met, were married and had two children: Mabel who married into the Pierce family, and a son, Edward Wilson. Mabel moved to Minnesota but Edward lived in and around the area and married Emma Smith, the youngest daughter of Isaac Smith. Isaac Smith was another pioneer. [EWB 05.]
       In the 1856 Iowa State Census, William G. Brewer is two years old, living with his mother, Margaret, his father, Wilson, and six siblings. He was born in Iowa. [WB 20.]
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, William G. Brewer is a six year-old, white male, born in Iowa, and going to school. He is living with his mother.
       In the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, William Brewer is 16 years old, white, male, and a farm laborer; he was born in Iowa; he had attended school within the year. And again, he is living with his mother. [MJM 02.]
       In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, William Brewer is head of household in Webster City, Iowa. He is white, male, married, 28 years old, a laborer. He was born in Iowa and indicated that both his parents were born in Indiana. (I know that his mother was born in Indiana, but his father may have been born in North Carolina, according to Brewer, Warren H. (1936). History of Brewer Family of North Carolina, Tennessee, Indiana, and Illinois and McKnight, Galyean (Gallion), Barr, Hutton, Bloxom, Lamb, Lewis and related families; also Woodworth, Newkirk, Crossland, Finley, Hatch, Hubbard and Carter. Terre Haute, IN: Self-published. [Can be found in Library of Congress; can also be purchased through Higginson, Salem Massachusetts.] With William are Eva[line] McGowan, his wife, 23 years of age, who is keeping house and whose parents were born in Illinois. Included are Mabel, a four year old daughter; and, Edward, a two year old son. The children's parents, William and Eva, were both born in Iowa.
       In the 1895 Iowa State Census, William Brewer is head of household in the 4th ward of Webster City. He is 41. In this household are Estella, his wife (35) and three daughters: Lulu (5), Myrtle (3), and Elva (1). William is a laborer, subject to military duty, and entitled to vote in elections. Both Estella and William are of protestant orientation in religion. Estella was born in Wisconsin and William was born in Hamilton County, Iowa. [WGB 05.]
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, William Brewer is head of household in Boone Township, Webster City, IA. William is white, male, and born in February of 1854; he is 46 years old, married, and has been married 12 years. He was born in Iowa; did not give the birthplace of his parents; he is a day laborer who has been out of work for two months (The census was taken on June 4, 1990). He owns the house that he and his family live in, free and clear. He must have divorced Evaline McGowan, probably in 1877/78. Then, he and Estella Comley married soon thereafter. Estella Comley is a white, female who is 41 years old. She was born in August of 1858 and has been married 12 years. She is the mother of three children, who are living. She was born in Wisconsin, her father in England, and her mother in Ohio. There are three white, female children from this family: Lulu 10 - July 1889, Myrtle 8 - July 1891, and Elva 5 - August 1894. They were all born in Iowa as was their father; their mother was born in Wisconsin. Of the five people in this family, the two adults can read, write, and speak English. Lulu is also literate since she is in school. It is not clear that Myrtle and Elva cannot read, write, and speak English. The census does not give that information.
       I have checked the U.S. Census in 1910, 1920, and 1930, but I have not found him in any state. He seems to have disappeared. And, for some reason, maybe that is what he wanted to do. But I, for one, would like to know the motive. 
Brewer, William Granville (I575)
 
22        According to her mother, Annette,:
"Deb's whole career was spent in the human services field. In 1995, she was hired by Kenosha County to set up a training program for county, state, and federal human services programs. She held training sessions across the state of Wisconsin. She served on two state boards and in 1996 was asked to present Wisconsin's Welfare to Work (W-2) program to the National "Conference of Eligibility Workers, held in Anchorage, Alaska. She was Kenosha County's chief ethics officer. Upon her death, the flags were flown at half-staff in Kenosha.
       Deb was a very talented person. She not only did handwork, but did some painting and made beautiful Ukrainian eggs. She was also gifted with the ability to converse with anyone she met. The Hebrew meaning of Deborah is "Industrious or Busy Bee and she certainly was that." [DEF 01] 
Formo, Deborah Eileen (I1136)
 
23        According to J. W. Lee, History of Hamilton County, Iowa (Chicago, Illinois: S. J. Clarke), 304-06:
[IS 01], David was a shoemaker, who followed his trade for nine years, but at the expiration of that time he remove with his family to Syracuse, where he engaged in the same occupation during the ensuring four years. Their next removal was to a little village in the vicinity of Cortland, and there he resumed his trade, which he followed at that point until 1863. In April of that year, he joined a colony going to Yankton, South Dakota, leaving his family in New York state. On his way westward, he stopped at Fort Doge, this state[Iowa], coming from there to Webster City, where he worked at his trade until August, 1863, when he returned to New York and in November, of that same year, came back to Webster City with his entire family. He remained here until 1885, when he again started westward with his wife and family in Webster City. For two years thereafter, he worked at his trade in Barber county, Kansas, going from there to California, where he passed away on the 7th of September 1893. The mother's death occurred three days later in Webster City, the father begin seventy-six years of age at the time of his demise and the mother sixty one. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Smith numbered four, of whom our subject is the eldest. 
Smith, David (I604)
 
24        According to J. W. Lee, History of Hamilton County, Iowa, (Chicago, Illinois: S. J. Clarke, 1912, 304-06), the education of Isaac Smith was obtained in the public schools of the state of New York, where he passed the first fifteen years of his life. After coming to Iowa, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and has ever since followed this vocation. At the age of twenty-one years, he began farming for himself, having acquired one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land, which form the nucleus of his present homestead. He subsequently extended the boundaries of his farm until he now holds the title to two hundred and forty acres, all of which is under high cultivation and annually yields abundant harvest which amply reward him for his hard labor. Mr. Smith has all of his land fenced hog tight and his fields are tiled. In connection with general farming, he makes a specialty of breeding and raising Duroc Jersey hogs and he also buys and feeds cattle for the market. He is diligent and enterprising as well as progressive in his methods and takes great pride in keeping up his place, the general appearance of which evidences the exercise of sound judgment and systematic supervision in its operation.
       The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church, and fraternally, Mr. Smith is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a member of Webster Lodge, No. 342. In his political views, he is republican and has served for six years as member of the school board. From early youth, Mr. Smith has been entirely dependent upon his own resources, and such success as has come to him through the intervening years is the result of Ernest, persistent effort and the determination of purpose that refused to acknowledge defeat. He is held in high regard in his community, where he has resided for forty-three years and is known to be a man of sterling worth and integrity.
       According to Mrs. Charles B. Fletchall [ACB 02], the Isaac Smith family lived on a farm near Kamrar and lived their final years at 1526 Des Moines Street, Webster City, Iowa.
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Isaac B. Smith, head of household, is a 52 year old, white, married male. He has been married to Minnie R. for 28 years. He was born in New York of parents who were both born in England. He is a farmer by occupation. He has not been unemployed; he speaks, reads, and writes English. He owns his own farm through a mortgage. Isaac lives with his wife, Minnie R, a son-in-law, Frank Seamonds, his daughter, the wife of Frank Seamonds, Mamie, and Floyd S. Pierce, a grandson, in Independence township, Hamilton County, Iowa. Floyd is the son of Isabel Smith and Charles Pierce, both of whom died of typhoid fever. [FSP 03.]
       In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Isaac B. Smith, as head of household, was 61 years old, male, white, and had been married for 37 years. He was born in New York from parents who had both been born in England. He was able to read, write, and speak English. His occupation was that of farmer, working on his own account; while he owned the farm, he was paying a mortgage. He was not a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy and was neither blind, deaf, or dumb. [IBS 02.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, seven years prior to his death, Isaac B. Smith is a 71 year old, white, married male. He is married to Maila Churchill. He was born in New York of parents who were both born in England. He is not employed or probably retired, we can assume. He speaks, reads, and writes English. Isaac and Maila live with their daughter and son-in-law, Emma and Edward Brewer, and three grandchildren, Floyd S. Pierce and Nedra and Alten Brewer, in Independence Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [EWB 06.] 
Smith, Isaac Bancroft (I603)
 
25        According to Loris' undated letter, she was born at home on the farm south of Fairchild, Wisconsin. The physician came from Fairchild to deliver her. She was baptized and confirmed at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Fairchild, Wisconsin.
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Loris M. Lange is a nine year old, white, single female. She was born of parents who were born in South Dakota (father) and Wisconsin (mother). She is in school, but is not considered fluent enough in English for the census taker to indicate that she can read, write, and speak English. She lives with her parents, Art and Alma, and a sister, Phyllis, in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [AHL 08.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Loris Margaret Lange lives in Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. She working in the Wanity Beauty Shop. She is a 22 year old, white, single female. She is living with the James B. Darend family as a lodger. Loris has not attended school or college, but she has attended Beauty School and she has graduated from High School. In 1935, she lived in Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin on a farm. At the time of the census, she is a wage worker in private business. She wored a 40 hour week prior to the Census. In 1939, she worked 26 weeks. She and income of $360 and no income from other sources. She lives with the Darend family at 820 Second Street, Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [LML 05.]
              OBITUARY
       Loris M. Schlegelmilch, age 93 of Eau Claire, died peacefully on Saturday, April 19, 2014, at Dove Healthcare West, in Eau Claire.
       She was born in Fairchild, WI on December 16, 1920, to Arthur and Alma (Arndt) Lange.
       Loris graduated from Fairchild High School in 1938. She then attended the Beauty School in Eau Claire. She married Donald W. Schlegelmilch Sr. on March 1, 1941, in Chippewa Falls, WI. While raising their four wonderful children, she worked at the Ed Phillips and Sons department store in the Jewelry Department. Loris was a very kind and gentle person who enjoyed gardening and baking, but most of all, she enjoyed being a homemaker and spending time with her family and friends. Loris was a special person to many people and loved by all. She will be greatly missed.
       Loris is survived by her daughter, Judi (Kenneth) Macke of Dublin OH; sons, Donald Jr. (Darlene), James (Ann) and Barry (Cindy) all of Eau Claire; grandchildren, Julie (Tom) Ericksen, Brenda (Steve) Parker, Tad (Karla) Kuhn, Aric (Melissa) Kuhn, Allison Macke, Leah (Jedd) Buchman, Aaron Schlegelmilch, Kevin (Melinda) Schlegelmilch, Brian (Emily) Schlegelmilch, Amanda Schlegelmilch; 14 great-grandchildren; sister, Phyllis Burrows; and other relatives and friends.
       She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Donald Sr.; and infant sister, Loretta.
       The Funeral Service will be a 11 a.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014, at Peace Lutheran Church, 501 E. Fillmore Avenue, Eau Claire, wit a visitation one hour prior to the service at church. Pastor Mark Schulz will be officiating.
       Interment will be in Rest Haven Cemetery. 
Lange, Loris Margaret (I53)
 
26        According to the death certificate, Benjamin Roland "Roll" Brewer was a mason, retired at time of death.
       In the 1850 U.S. Federal Census, "Bolen" is a 15 year old male, born in "Ohio." He is living with his parents, Wilson and Jane, who were also born in "Ohio," two brothers (Andrew J., John T.) and three sisters (Sarah, Julia, and probably Nancy). [WB 06.]
       The 1856 Iowa State Census indicates that Roland Brewer was born in 1836. This could have been an estimate since the death certificate is very clear on the date of birth. [WB 20 & DLL.]
       On March 12, 1857, "Roll" Brewer became the administrator for the estate of his father, Wilson Brewer. His older brother, Andrew J. Brewer was the original administrator for the W. Brewer estate, but he died very suddenly on March 07, 1857. Between 1857 and 1866, not much attention was given to this matter other than the routine paying of bills and sale of property to support the minor children of W. Brewer. There was the matter of the Civil War in which B. R. Brewer did participate. In 1866, his administration was challenged by Thomas B. Bonebright, husband of B. R. Brewer's younger sister, Sarah. "Roll" Brewer was accused of being "guilty of waste and mal administration." He was summoned to court, defended himself, and subsequently resigned as administrator of the W. Brewer estate. [BRB 11.]
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Benjamin R. Brewer is found in Troy township, Wright County Iowa. He is a 24 year old, male farmer and I assume, single. He was born in Indiana. His real estate value is estimated at $830 and personal estate at $100.
       Between November 1864 and July 1865, Benjamin R. Brewer was a soldier in the Civil War on the Union Side. He enlisted at the age of 28 in Company I, 16th Iowa Infantry Regiment. It may be that he participated with General Sherman in the Georgia campaign. [BRB 14; BRB 15; BRB 18] From the Military Record, Benajmin R. Brewer was 28 years old upon enlistment. His height was 5 feet 7 inches, light complexion, blue eyes, brown hair. The enlistment or draft date was November 18, 1864 at Fort Dodge, Iowa. Reported for duty at Goldsboro, NC, April 01, 1865. He was mustered out on July 19, 1865 in Louisville, Kentucky. [BRB 18.]
       In the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Benjamin R. Brewer is living with his third wife, Judith Henshaw in Cass township of Hamilton County, Iowa. He is a 36 year old male farmer who was born in Indiana. With him and his wife are Jane E., Margaret, and Charles E. [BRB 17.]
       In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Benjamin Roland "Roll" Brewer was married to Judith C. Henshaw (Brewer). He was a white, thirty-four year old male; his occupation was that of a farmer. He was born in Indiana of parents he indicates were both born in Iowa. [This is not true; his father Wilson was born in North Carolina and Rhonda Stanley, his mother, was born there also.] Three children are living with him: Charles, Frederick, and Nettie. [BRB 08.]
       In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Benjamin Roland Brewer is a 44 year old, white, widowed male. He lives on Superior Street, 2nd Ward, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. He was born in Indiana. He is living with four children - three by Judith Henshaw and one by Betsy Frakes: Charles, Frederick, Anneta, and Margaret E. He is a farmer. [BRB 19.]
       In the 1895 Iowa State Census, Benjamin R. Brewer is a 58 year old white, male who is living with his wife, Ellen, two sons (Fred M. and Peter "Frank") and a daughter, Nettie. They all live in the 4th Ward, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. The Census shows that "Roll" Brewer was in Company I of the Iowa 16th Regiment during the "War of the Rebellion." Also living with them are three people: Ruth Blair(n), a 15 year old single female; Wilson Blair, a 28 single, white male, a laborer; and, Fred Blair, a 21 year old, white, single male. [BRB 24.]
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Benjamin R. Brewer, a white male, is living in Webster City, Iowa, Ward 4. He is living with his wife Nellie (Ellen) and their son, Frank. Benjamin is a married, white, male who indicated that he was born in February of 1831[when he was actually born in 1834 in Sept]. He indicated he was born in Indiana of parents who were born in Indiana [father in North Carolina, actually]. He is a day laborer, who has been out of work for nine months. He speaks, reads, and writes English. He owns his own home, free and clear. In the home, there is also a roomer by the name of George Bonebright. George is divorced. [BRB 16.]
       In 1905, B. R. [Benjamin Roland] Brewer is living on James Street, 4th Ward, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa, with his wife, Ellen, and son Frank. [BRB 20.]
       In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Benjamin R. Brewer, a white male, is living in Webster City, Iowa, Ward 4. He is living with his then wife (4), Ellen E.. He was born in Indiana of parents that were both born in Indiana (Father - North Carolina; mother - Indiana). He speaks, reads, and writes English. At this time, he is 75 years old, in his 4th marriage, one of a 22 year duration at this point. He owns his home free and clear. He is a veteran of the Union Army. [I cannot read trade or profession or general nature of industry or business- DLL] [BRB 13.]
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Daily Freeman Journal, 18 April 1921
       Roll Brewer Drops Dead Aged Pioneer Settler of Webster City Falls Dead in Home of Apoplexy, Came Here in 1850 Had Lived in This Community Longer Than any Other Man
       B. R. Brewer, known in Webster City for a good many years as "Roll" Brewer, dropped dead in his home Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock of apoplexy. He had been in poor health for some time, but had been up and about all the time and his passing came unexpectedly and as a shock to relatives and friends.
       The funeral was held this afternoon from the home at 1131 James street, conducted by Rev. Manson E. Miller. Mr. Brewer was past 86 years of age, having been born Oct. 20, 1834 in the state of Indiana.
       Came Here in 1850
       Benjamin R. Brewer came to Hamilton county with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Brewer, in 1850 and the family located near the present site of Stratford, later called Hook's Point. They came from Indiana with an ox team and covered wagon and never crossed a railroad in the entire trip. After living near Hook's point for a year the family removed to what was known as the Eyer farm, just southeast of what is now Webster City and what was later a part of Webster City. A year or two later the family removed to a claim a little nearer to the present site of Webster City and built a cabin on the north bank of Brewer creek, near the bridge on Superior street.
At the time of his death Mr. Brewer had lived longer in Webster City and vicinity than any other man, having come her with his parents in 1851 and having lived here and in this section of country for seventy years. His sister, Mrs. Thomas Bonebright, who survives him, alone equals his record of long residence and still lives in this city on a part of the homestead her father entered along in 1852.
Saw Town Start
       Mr. Brewer witnessed the building of Webster City from the time the first house was erected to the present. When the family located on what was later known as the Eyer farm there was not another family in this vicinity. There was not a fence, a road or any kind of improvement, the landscape being exactly as it had been for ages.
A span of seventy years is a long time in the history of Webster City. In fact it has witnessed every improvement made here. The hardy pioneers who came to this part of Iowa in the fifties endured all the hardships incident to the opening up of a new country and they laid the broad foundations for the present civilization and prosperity. The present generation knows nothing of what they encountered and overcame, the trials that beset them and the fortitude with which they met and conquered all obstacles.
The deceased lived here continuously except during his service in the Civil war. Shortly before his departure for the front he was married to Jane Frakes, daughter of Patrick Frakes, a neighbor pioneer. Before his return from the war his wife died, leaving an infant daughter, now Mrs. Jennie Carmichael, of Clarion. Later he married Betsey Frakes, who also died leaving a daughter six weeks old, now Mrs. Margaret House, of Harlingen, Texas. His third wife, Judith Stone-Brewer, bore him three children, Charles of Kansas City, Fred, deceased, and Annetta Bell of this city who was but two weeks' old at her mother's death. To his last marriage with Ellen O'Rourke, now deceased, one son was born, Frank, who resided with his father at his death.
Roll Brewer served in the 16th Iowa regiment under Captain Williams. The time covered only about a year but was strenuous and picturesque as he was engaged at Nashville and accompanied Sherman on his march to the Sea and less destructive raids. At the close of hostilities he received his discharge, and for several years has drawn a pension.
       His passing leaves but one of the original votes who elected our first county officers, after the division of Hamilton and Webster counties. All now are gone except J. D. Sketchley.
During the early years of his residence here, "Roll" hunted and trapped over almost every foot of what is Hamilton county, and as the herds of big game diminished in size he covered Boone, Wright, Webster and Humboldt counties. He was an expert marksman and has killed dozens of deer on the site of our present city: a favorite haunt of deer being the ravine which flanks his home and the bottom lands along the river. The numbers of wolves, wildcats, rattlesnakes and other dangerous varmints killed by him easily ran into the hundreds.
       He was a student of nature instead of books. He knew the habits and haunts of wild beasts and their trails and tracks. He knew the feeding-;laces of wild-fowl and the nesting places of wood-songsters. He knew the bird's love twitter, the note of content or the scream of fear. He loved the forest trees and ferns and native flowers. He could take a B-line through the woods to a storehouse of wild honey, and the root and herb fields were familiar to him. As he studied animals he studied men and found them much the same. The instinct of animals and the intuition of men is for protection, he declared, and if not gained by open conflict then by craft and cruelty. He guessed the intent of a man as accurately as he predicted the spring of the panther and he gauged his conduct accordingly. He was unacquainted with the inside walls of schools, but he was not unfamiliar with the ordinary processes of the human mind. He did not give snap judgment, but given a premise and his conclusions were generally unerring--they reached the mark as his bullets hit the target.
In this initial trip to Homer, Roll Brewer, then a youth, lost his bearings for the first and last time. Thereafter he made such a thorough study of the surrounding topography that he became an accurate and valued guide for travelers and newcomers wishing to locate land. He knew the natural fords, the location of springs and the well-stocked fishponds, and piloted the pioneers on raft, flatboat or in canoe as well as through woods across swamps or over prairies.
       Roll Brewer had the outlook and understanding of the pathfinder, and admitted in confidence that he should have followed the frontier instead of yielding to inertia of nature and the cramping, dwarfing confines of civilization. He, however, registered no complaints and held no resentment. He passed tranquilly through the startling changes of his more than four-score years. He kept his feet firmly planted on the ground and retained his mental faculties until the moment of his death. His advice was dependable and his friendship enduring. He was quiet, unobtrusive, unafraid. When the death of a father full of years calls from the lips of a grief-stricken son, the cry--"He was a good father to me," the long life of struggle has not been in vain. Success is achieved. [BRB 07.]
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       (I have had a relatively long struggle to figure out the names of the last two wives of Benjamin Brewer. It is my belief that he had four wives: Jane Frakes; Betsey Frakes - these two are very clearly the names of the first two. The name Judith Henshaw is also sometimes Judith Stone. The marriage document clearly says Henshaw, but there is also the name Judith Stone in BRB 07. While I cannot completely prove that they are the same, I will make that assumption. The name of the 4th wife is most difficult to prove concretely. Is it Nellie Conlin as the marriage document indicates [BRB 6] or is it Ellen O'Rourke? In a Department of Interior Document [BRB 21], the name of his wife is Ellen Elizabeth O'Rourke, whom it says that he married in Aug. of 1889 by A. P. Flemming, J. P. The date of the marriage document is June 20, 1889 and A. P. Flemming is the J. P. Because the affidavit from the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions and the marriage document are so close, I will accept as a working hypothesis that Ellen E. O'Rourke and Nellie Conlin are the same person.
       The document also indicates a Julia Stone of a previous marriage, who died September 1880. I do not have a death date for Judith Henshaw. Because the 1885 Iowa State census indicates B. R. Brewer as a widower [BRB 19] and because the 1880 U. S. Federal Census indicates a living wife, Judith C. [BRB 08], I have to assume that Benjamin's third wife, died between 1880 and 1885. Thus, the death of Julia Stone in Sept. of 1880 can be accepted as a reasonable hypothesis for her death month and year. Therefore, another working hypothesis is that Judith Stone, Julia Stone, and Judith Henshaw are the same person.)
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       The National Archives Pension file on Benjamin R. Brewer (SC 880.522) appears to be a typical set of documents - at least as I have seen them - for a soldier from the Civil War. The illnesses of such soldiers, and B. R. Brewer appears to be no exception, are denied, pensions are denied for a number of reasons, all of which appear to prevent the soldier from receiving a pension. Roll Brewer it appears has been sick with kidney and breathing problems since after the Civil War. He is denied at first because he cannot prove a birth date, he is illiterate, or there is lack of belief in his illness. I cannot reproduce the file here, but anyone who reads it should read it carefully to ascertain my reading of the file. [BRB 22.]
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       A story that was sent to me by Nadine Dingman, Webster City, Iowa, that has "Roll" Brewer in it::
Webster City Remembers Death of Circus Strong Man
       Des Moines Sunday Register, June 23, 1985.
       By Tom O'Donnell
       WEBSTER CITY, IA. -- Monsieur Dialo died over a handful of peanut shells.
       Dialo, a strong man with the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Baily Circus, probably never knew it, but it was those fateful shells, thrown through a window at a drunken Webster City saloon keeper, that led to his fatal shooting 97 years ago this week.        Dialo's body still lies in Webster City's Graceland Cemetery, left behind but not forgotten by the Ringlings.
       "The Ringling Brothers Circus supposedly put flowers out each year" on Memorial Day, said Max Maxon, editor of the Webster City Freeman Journal, and a Webster City native.
       But the flowers ended a few years ago, Maxon said, leaving just a few plastic sprays. This year, Maxon drummed up some attention for Dialo's grave (Section I, Lot 41), and several bouquets appeared there this Memorial Day. "He was remembered better than he was for years," Maxon said.
       It would have been easy for Dialo, who was really 25 year-old James W. Richardson, to be forgotten, buried far from his Rhode Island hometown. Webster City turned out to be the final destination in a trip that started with the Ringlings in 1884.
       "His name appears in the route book" for the circus in 1884, said Bob Parkinson, curator of the Circus World Museum in Baraboo, Wis. Henry Ringling North's 1960 book, "The Circus Kings: Our Ringling Family Story" notes that the Ringlings' 1884 winter wagon show, "The Carnival of Fun," was joined in the last part of its 1884 tour by "talented young James Richardson, who was billed as Monsieur Dialo. They liked him so much that they engaged him for the circus as well."
Neither North's book nor Parkinson's records shed much light on what Richardson did with the circus, but the Webster City Graphic noted in its editions that Richardson "was the magician, fire eater, and man who lifted the heavy weights with the circus. He was a man of splendid physical development."
       No mention of Richardson is made in an advertisement in the June 20, 1884, Webster City Freeman. "THE BIGGEST AND BEST SHOW -- Ever in Hamilton County will exhibit in Webster City Saturday, June 23rd!" the ad said. "Ringling Bros. 7 Monster Shows!" Admission was advertised at 25 cents.
Peanut Shells and Revenge
       An account in the Graphic bring up the strange connection between a handful of peanut shells and the altercation. The night of June 23, while the circus was performing on the edge of town, "Roll Brewer, who was partially drunk, threw a handful of peanut shells into Tom Basket's window and made an insulting remark to Tom."
       Basket followed Brewer onto the circus grounds, knocked him down and "kicked him in the face in a most brutal manner," newspaper accounts say. Brewer's daughter ran to her father's defense, and was knocked down and kicked in turn.
       Basket was "giving her rather rough usage, when some of the showmen interfered"
       "Tom went downtown again," the Graphic reported. "He either had his revolver with him or went after it and in a short time returned to the grounds, threatening to 'do up' the show generally."
       The Freeman reported on June 27, 1888, that a coroner's jury charged Basket with first-degree murder. "The prevailing opinion in the community will fully sustain the finding of the coroner's jury; yet all law-abiding citizens agree that the accused -- bad as he is -- is entitles to his day in court, and until a legal examination is had, it is only proper and right that the public judgment shall be suspended as to the measure of Tom Basket's guilt."
       Altercation with Showman
       Basket was held for trial in February 1889. One witness said, "I heard him say that he was looking for a fellow that struck him, and that he was going to lick the fellow before he left town."
       One of the circus workers didn't like Basket's tone of voice, and may have recognized him from the first incident. He told Basket to leave.
       The town marshal, a man by the name of Hathway, testified that he saw Basket arguing with the circus worker. "A showman was asked to go away. He didn't go," testified a terse Hathway. "He went when I took him."
       Basket said he had done nothing wrong, and "No son of a ____ of a showman could run him out. Just then they run right up and began striking," Hathway testified.
       Hathway was struck several times in the melee, and Deputy Sheriff John Atkinson ran to his aid. Richardson, about that time, walked out of a nearby sideshow tent.
       Atkinson, meanwhile, picked Basket upon off the ground and began leading him off the grounds.
       Fatal Interruption
       Richardson, trying to break things up, told the crowd, "Boys, stand back, I'll settle this matter." Richardson took hold of one circus man and told Atkinson, "You take care of your man and I'll take care of mine."
       Atkinson was pushing a resisting Basket down the road, headed off the grounds, when Basket suddenly turned, drew a .38-caliber pistol, and fired.
"I'm shot!" Richardson said, grabbing his abdomen. He staggered into a sideshow tent, then was rushed to the Willson House to be cared for.
Basket, as he was being taken away, muttered that "he hope by God he'd killed him," Atkinson testified.
       Richardson was struck in the abdomen, the bullet lodging near his spine. After lingering for a day, he died on Sunday, June 24, 1888.
       Basket was found guilty of second-degree murder and sentenced to 15 years at Anamosa, despite an appeal for mercy by his lawyer.
       "I may be added, to the credit of human sympathy, that there were but few dry eyes in all that vast audience," the Freeman wrote on March 6, 1889. "The picture...was one seldom seen in a life time! there sat the father accused of murder, literally buried under the evidence -- surrounded by his three children, the youngest of whom is a motherless baby, too young to list 'Father'..."
       Ringlings Bought Tombstone
       Richardson's relatives, a father and sister from Nantucket, R. I., either forgot about him or decided not to make the long trip to Webster City for the funeral. the Ringlings bought a tall stone to make the grave, and engraved it both with Richardson's real name and his stage name, Monsieur Dialo.
       "The whole affair is a most disgraceful and unfortunate one," the Graphic reported. "The showmen are, so far as we can see, blameless in the matter."
       The experience apparently left a sour taste in the Ringlings' mouths. "The Ringling brothers at that time swore they'd never show in Webster City again," Maxon said. It was a promise they held to until the 1920s. [BRB 25.] 
Brewer, Benjamin Roland (I973)
 
27        According to the Death Certificate, death was by suicide at 1:20 a.m. on 6/16/59.
       The death certificate indicates that he was born on January 06, 1914; he was born on the 05. He is listed as having been born in Kentucky; he was born in Iowa. His Mother gave false information. [DLL.] 
Brewer, George Keefer (I2277)
 
28        According to the New York Passenger Lists Record, Friedrich Krienke arrived in New York City from Bremen, Germany on the ship, Columbia, December 02, 1872. At that time, he is a 23 year old, white, male. He is heading toward Wisconsin, coming from Posen. [FK 01.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Friedrich Krienke is a 52 year old, white, married male. He is married to Bertha G. Krienke and has been for 20 years. He was born in Germany (Posen) of parents who were both born in Germany. He entered the United States 28 years prior to this census, in 1872. He may have been naturalized in Pennsylvania. He is a farmer. who owns his own farm, free and clear. Friedrich lives with his wife, Bertha, and nine children (Emma, Lena, Julius, Carl, Hulda, Herman, Reinhart, Clara, Lillie) in Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [FK 02.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Friedrich Krienke is a 61 year old, white, married male. He has been married to Bertha Bethke for 30 years. He was born in Germany (Posen) of parents who were also born in Germany. He immigrated to the U. S. in 1872. His native language is German, but he also reads, writes, and speaks English. He is a farmer, working in the area of general farming. He works on his own account. He owns his own farm, free and clear. He is not a survivor of the Civil War, either Union or Confederate. He lives with his wife, Bertha, and five children (Hulda, Reinhart, Herman, Clara, Lilly) in Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [FK 03.] 
Krienke, Friedrich (I2143)
 
29        Adopted by Samuel Farguson, his mother's second husband. See volume 4 of the Romedahl Family History for more information.
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Arthur K. Bonebright is a one year old, white, single male. He was born in Iowa of parents who were both born in Iowa. He was born in May, 1899. He lives with his mother, Kathrine L. Johnson (Bonebright) in Marshalltown, 2nd Ward, Marshall Township, Marshall county, Iowa. [KLJ 02.]
This same information is given for the same census year, 1900, only from a different location where Kathrine works as a servant, keeping house. [AFK 02.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Arthur K. Bonebright (Farguson) is a 10 year old, white single male. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Iowa (Kathrine L. Johnson and George W. Bonebright). He is working as a Bell Boy. He is in school. He lives with his mother, Kathrine and Samuel M. Farguson (it is not clear, at least at this point, when he was adopted and began to use the last name of Farguson), his sister Myrtle, and two half-siblings (Ruth and Samuel), and an Aunt of Samuel, Mary Gillespie. [SMF 01.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Arthur K.( Bonebright) Farguson is a 20 year old, white, single male. He is not in school, but reads, writes, and speaks English. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Ohio (father ?) and Michigan (mother ?). He is a car inspector for a railroad and is working at the time of the census. He lives with his parents, Samuel and Katherine, his step father's brother, John, and a half brother, Samuel, in Marshalltown, 3rd Ward, Marshall Township, Marshall County, Iowa. [SMF 02.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Arthur K. (Bonebright) Farguson is a 31 year old, white, single male. He reads, write, and speaks English. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Iowa. He is a brakeman for a railroad; he is a worker class and was not working at the time of the census. He is not a veteran of any U. S. Military service. He lives with his mother, a half-brother, and a niece of his mother, Gladys L. Beavers, at 3604 Park Avenue, 10th Ward, Block 139, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. [KLJ 03.] 
Bonebright, Arthur Keith (I1349)
 
30        After arrival in New York in 1904, the Schlegelmilch family moved to Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. In 1905, they participated in the first census in the United States. It was the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. In that Census, Gustav Schlegelmilch produced the following information as head of household: White, male, married, 48 years of age, born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany. Gustav is a day laborer as an occupation and is employed 12 months. Gustav rents his home. Gustav lives with his wife, Thekla and children, William, Selma, Carl, and Iline. The family lives in the 9th ward of Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SGA 03.]  Schlegelmilch, Gustav Adolph Theodor (I2976)
 
31        After arrival in New York in 1904, the Schlegelmilch family moved to Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. In 1905, they participated in the first census in the United States. It was the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. In that Census, Carl is a seven year old, white, single male. He was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany and with whom he currently lives. He also lives with three siblings: William, Selma, and Iline. The family lives in the 9th ward of Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SGA 03.] Schlegelmilch, Carl (I2985)
 
32        After arrival in New York in 1904, the Schlegelmilch family moved to Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. In 1905, they participated in the first census in the United States. It was the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. In that Census, Iline is a five year old, white, single female. She was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany and with whom she is currently living. She is also living with three siblings: William Selma, and Carl. The family is living in the 9th Ward of Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SGA 03.] Schlegelmilch, Iline (I2986)
 
33        After arrival in New York in 1904, the Schlegelmilch family moved to Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. In 1905, they participated in the first census in the United States. It was the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. In that Census, Selma is a nine year old, white, single female. She was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany and now living in the United States with her. She also lives with three siblings: William, Car, and Iline. The family lives in the ninth Ward of Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SGA 03.] Schlegelmilch, Selma (I2984)
 
34        After arrival in New York in 1904, the Schlegelmilch family moved to Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. In 1905, they participated in the first census in the United States. It was the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. In that Census, Thekla, as she is and will be known is a 44 year old, white, married female. She was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany. She lives with her husband, Gustav Adolf and four children: William, Selma, Carl, and Iline. The family lives in the City of Eau Claire, Ninth Ward, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SGA 03.]  Linse, Auguste Henriette Thekla Louise (I2977)
 
35        After arrival in New York in 1904, the Schlegelmilch family moved to Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. In 1905, they participated in the first census in the United States. It was the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. In that Census, William is a 12 year old, white, single male. He was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in German and with whom he lives. There is no other information given for him. He also lives with three siblings: Selma, Carl, and Iline. The family lives in Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SGA 03.]
       In the 1917 WWI Draft Registration Card for William Walter Schlegelmilch, there is the following information:
Name: William Walter Schlegelmilch
Age: 23
Home Address: 536 Mill Street, Eau Claire, WIS
Date of Birth: August 10, 1894
Citizen? Alien
Where Were You Born: Erfurt, Germany
Of What Country Are You a Citizen: Germany
Present Occupation: Wood Worker
By Whom employed: Pioneer Fur Co.
Where: Eau Claire
Dependents: Wife and one child
Married or single: Married
Race: Caucasian
Military Service: None
Do you claim exemption from draft? Yes, to support family.
Signature: William Walter Schlegelmilch
REGISTRAR'S REPORT
Height: Short
Body: Medium
Eye Color: Blue
Hair Color: Brown
Bald: No [SWW 01.]
Disabilities: Near sighted
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, William Walter Schlegelmilch is a 24 year old, white, married male. He is married to Edna E. Jarosch. According to the record, William immigrated to the U. S. in 1905; according to other records in this compilation, he actually entered the U. S. in 1904. But he is considered an alien. William was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany as well. His native language is German. Yet he reads, writes, and speaks English. He rents his home. William's occupation is that of carpenter in the refrigerator industry where he is an employer. William and Edna live at 311 Third Street, Ward 9, Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. With them live two of their children: Donald W. and Harold K. Schlegelmilch. [SWW 05.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, William Walter Schlegelmilch is a 35 year old, white, married male. He was born in Germany of parents who were also both born in Germany. His native language is German, but he reads, writes, and speaks English. He is married to Edna and they were first married when William was 21. William is not attending school.He owns his own home that is valued at $1,500. He does not live on a farm. William immigrated in 1904 and has submitted his first papers for naturalization. His occupation is that of trunk make in a trunk factory. His class of worker is that a wage or salary worker. He is employed. William lives with his wife, Edna, and three children: Donald, Kenneth, and Beverly. The family lives at 605 Gilbert Street, Ward 9, Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SWW 06.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, William Walter Schlegelmilch is a 45 year old, white, married male. He is married to Edna Jarosch. He is not attending school or college, but he has completed the equivalent of 8th grade. William was born in Germany and is still considered an alien. He has lived in the same house since 1935, which is not on a farm. He owns his own home, which is at 605 Gilbert Street. The value of the home is approximately $2.500. William's occupation is that of laborer, who worked 40 hours in the week prior to the census. He worked 52 weeks in 1939. His salary is 200 per week and he has no other income sources. William lives with his wife, Edna, and three children (Donald, Kenneth [Harold], and Beverly) at 605 Gilbert, Ward 9, Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SWW 07.]
       In the WWII Draft Registration Card, there is not a whole lots of information, but is somewhat interesting:
Serial Number: 1800
Name: William Walter Schlegelmilch
Residence: 605 Gilbert St., Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wis.
Mailing Address: Same
Age: 47 years
Place of Birth: does not know
Country: Germany
Telephone: None
Date of Birth: Aug 10, 1894
Name and Address of Person Who Will Always Know Your Address: Mrs. Edna Schlegelmilch, 605 Gilbert St. Eau Claire, Wis
Employer's Name and Address: Wahl Trunk Co.
Place of Employment or Business: Wahl Trunk Co., Randall St., Eau Claire, Wis.
Signature: William w. Schlegelmilch [SWW 03.]


 
Schlegelmilch, William Walter (I121)
 
36        After the death of Michael Pierce in 1676 in Rhode Island, the Plymouth Colony Court appointed Mr. John Jacob of Hingham as guardian for John Pierce. [JP 01.] Pierce, John (I1981)
 
37        All of a sudden, William H. Meeks arrives on the scene. We have not seen him prior to this moment. I do not have time to find him in a previous census document. Someone else will have to do that for us. In the 1870 U. S. Federal Census, William H. Meeks is a 17 year old, white male. He was born in Ohio of parent who were born in Ohio (father) and Pennsylvania (mother). His occupation is that of form laborer. He has attended school within the past year. William lives with his parents, John and Elizabeth, four sisters (Emeretta, Mary, Lenora, Susan), a brother, Lafayette, and his grandfather, John Meeks. The family lives in Webster Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [MJ 02.] Meeks, William H. (I2921)
 
38        Alma Anna Augusta Arndt Lange, like her husband, Art, was a cheerful soul. Dale's perceptions of her always saw her with a broad smile and a cheerful heart. When Dale came to Fairchild, Wisconsin for visits, Aunt Alma always seemed to be cooking on the wood stove in the kitchen of the farm house. And, the meals always "schmekt," whether breakfast, lunch or dinner. One of his favorites was Aunt Alma's fried chicken. And, there was usually plenty of it. He even watched her chase down the chickens, behead them, clean them, and fry them. And, on top of that came the mashed potatoes. Wonderful memories. Oh, yes, he saw Alma cry once, at Phyllis and Alman Burrowes wedding. But, she was both happy and sad; happy for her daughter and sad that she was losing her. Alma also milked cows. Dale can still see her on the milking stool, squirting milk into the pail. And, sometimes Dale got a chance to get squirted in the mouth with warm milk...yummmmmmmmm!
       On the day of Alma's funeral, Dale was on his way from Minneapolis, Minnesota. When he got to the Wisconsin border, he realized that Wisconsin was in a different time zone. And, did he then burn rubber. He got to the church just as the church bell was ringing. Almy Burrowes was waiting at the door with tears in his eyes. He was afraid that Dale would not be there before the casket was closed. But, Dale made it. The last person to view her. She didn't have a smile on her face, but that is the way Dale remembers her.
Art and Alma farmed in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, south of Fairchild, Wisconsin from 1915 to 1967 when they sold the farm and moved into Fairchild itself. She, like her husband, was a member of St. Paul's Lutheran Church.
       Judith Anne Schlegelmilch (Macke) [JAS 01] says: "Alma baked all her bread when they lived on the farm - she made the best rolls and loaves of bread. I would watch her bake when I was a kid. She always had a large vegetable garden and I would help her pick various vegetables from the garden. She only had a wood burning stove to work with. She canned vegetables and even canned meat sometimes. I would spend a week or so at Grandma's during strawberry picking time and go over to Grandma sisters to pick the berries to make some money."
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Alma A. A. Arndt is a four year old, single, white, female. She lives with her parents, Rudolph and Mathilda, and three siblings - Fredric, Adolph, and Elsie. She lives in Fairchild, Fairchild Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. She was born in Wisconsin of parents who were born in Germany (father) and mother (Wisconsin). She is not yet in school. [RJA 02.]
       In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Alma Arndt is a nine year old, white, single female. She was born in Wisconsin of parents who were born in Wisconsin (mother) and Germany (father). She lives with her parents, Rudolph and Mathilda, and three brothers, Fred, Adolph, Edward, and a sister, Elsie. The family lives in Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [RJA 06.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Alma Arndt is a 14 year old, white, single female. She was born in Wisconsin of parents who were born in Germany (father) and Wisconsin (mother). She speaks, reads, and writes English; she is attending school. She has no employ outside the home. She lives with her parents, Rudolph and Mathilda, and four siblings (Fred, Adolph, Elsie, Edward) in Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [RJA 05.]
       Alma A. A. Arndt Lange appears in the 1920 U.S. Federal Census. She is 23, female, white, and married to Arthur H. Lange. She can read, write and speak English. She was born in Wisconsin; her father in Brunswick, Germany; he spoke German; her mother was born in Wisconsin. With Art and Alma is their almost 1.5 year old daughter, Loretta E. Lange. They all live in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [AHL 05.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Alma Arndt Lange is a 33 year old, white, married female. She is married to Art Lange. She was 19 years old when first married. She was born in Wisconsin of parents who were both born in Germany (probably Prussia). She has no employ outside the home. She reads, writes, and speaks English. Alma lives with her husband, Arthur, and two children (Loris and Phyllis) in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [AHL 08.]
       The obituary for Alma Lange, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, September 24, 1983, reads:
       "Services were today in Fairchild for Alma A. Lange, 87, who died Friday at Luther Hospital, Eau Claire.
       Alma Arndt was born in Fairchild and married Arthur Lange on Oct. 12, 1915 in Fairchild. They farmed in the town of Cleveland, Jackson County.
       Survivors include two daughters, Loris Schlegelmilch, Chippewa Falls, Phyllis Burrows, Eau Claire, a brother Edward Arndt, Mr. Vernon, Wash.,; and nine grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren.
Burial was in Fairchild Cemetery.
       Anderson Funeral Home, Augusta, was in charge of arrangements." [AAAA 02.] 
Arndt, Alma Anna Augusta (I50)
 
39        Although his name is Henry Walter, he was known as Walter Emanuel. See scrapbook for picture of Henry Walter Emanuel's gravestone. The name on the gravestone is Walter H. Emanuel.
       He held the post of village treasure for eight years. He was also appointed postmaster in Fairchild. He was a man of honesty and integrity.
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Henry Walter is a nine year old, white, single male. He was born in Wisconsin of parents who were both born in Germany. He is in school. He lives with his parents, Edward and Paulina, and one sister, Selma, in the village of Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [EGE 05.]
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Walter Emanuel, a single, white male, is 19 years old. He reads, speaks, and writes English and was born in Wisconsin of parents who were both born in Germany and who both speak German as a native language. He is half owner of a movie theater in Fairchild, Wisconsin. He lives in Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin with his parents, Edward and Paulina, and an uncle, William Zech. [EGE 04.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Henry Walter Emanuel is a 29 year old, white, single male. He was born in Wisconsin of parents who were both born in Germany. He speaks, reads, and writes English. By occupation, he is a salesman in his father's grocery store. He is classified as a worker and was at work at the time of the census. He is not a veteran of any U. S. military organization. He lives with his parents, Edward and Pauline, one sister, Selma, and an uncle, William Zech, in the village of Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [EGE 06.]
       An undated obituary for Henry Walter Emanuel was printed after his death. It was provided by Lois Krienke Papke. It reads as follows:
       Edward Walter Emanuel
       Henry Walter Emanuel, son of Edward and Pauline Emanuel was born in this village, September 17, 1900, when a month old he was baptized into the Lutheran church. As soon as he reached the age of discretion he entered the confirmation class and on May 16, 1925, he, together with 21 others renewed the pledge of allegiance to the church which matured him in his faithfulness toward his Savior and his church, he never wavered. The deceased had been endowed with splendid mental gifts and with a friendly and winning personality, the community was soon convinced there was a citizen of no mean ability, and after he graduated from Fairchild High School he held the office of village treasurer for eight consecutive years, while holding this office his integrity was never questioned, and was always ready to advise those who came to him with their problems. When the present administration took over their reign of government, Walter was appointed postmaster and again his talents stood him in good stead and he left this post in such a condition as to bring his successor the least possible difficulty.
       A few weeks ago the deceased suffered an attack of severe pain, and suffering, but this attack passed. But not for long - on Sunday, May 24, he had another attack which the doctor diagnosed as very serious. It was a ruptured appendix and called for an immediate operation. Though this operation was a success, it was soon learned that peritonitis had set in and Walter could not live. In spite of all medical skill and loving hearts and hands could do he passed away, June 2, 1936, at the Sacred Heart hospital at Eau Claire at the age of 35 years, 8 months and 15 days.        His passing was peaceful and resigned and his dying wish was to meet his mother over there. Walter's early passing has left may wounded hearts and tear stained eyes. The grieving survivors are his father, Edward Emanuel; his mother having preceded him (2 years) and one sister, Selma Krienke, an uncle, William Zech, a constant companion, living with the family many years; a large circle of relatives and friends, far and near.
       Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon from the Lutheran church, Rev. Paul Buck officiating. He took his text from John 1 Verse 11; Matthew 14 and Verse 12, and in order to accommodate the overflow crowd, two loud speakers were installed to convey Rev. Buck's message and the music to the packed throng outside the church. It was by far the largest funeral ever held in Fairchild. to give some idea of the immense crowd, it took thirty minutes for them to pass by and view the remains. the flowers were beautiful and the large amount of them showed the love and respect held for him by all.
       The pallbearers were postmasters as follows: Knuth of Neillsville; John Michael of Humbird; H. Quast of Willard; Barnes of Greenwood; Myres of Loyal, and ??? of Granton.
       Persons from out of town to attend the funeral are: Mrs. Sam Gillus, Oak Park, Ill.; Mrs. Joe Parry and Gladys Parry, Mrs. and Mrs. Otto Zech, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wenzlaff, Champaign, Ill.; Mrs. and Mrs. Gust Emanuel, Mrs. and Mrs. Edw. Boetzer, Fall Creek; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Emanuel of Altoona; Mr. and Mrs. Gust Papowski, Mrs. Roney Young, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Emanuel, Eau Claire; Mrs. and Mrs. August Senske, Mrs. and Mrs. August Bundt, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Schadler, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Emanuel, Mrs. and Mrs. Albert Emanuel, Mrs. Phillip Treiber, Mr. and Mrs. D. V. Lampman, August; Mr. and Mrs. Russell Sullivan, Madison; Mrs. and Mrs. Clarence Sechler, Alma Center; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lange, Fall Creek; Mr. and Mrs. Jule Olson and children, Black River Falls; Edward Emanuel and son of Milbank, N. D.
       Card of Thanks
       We wish to thank all those that helped us in any way during the illness and death of our dear son and brother. We especially wish to thank Rev. Buck for his comforting words, and all those who furnished cars, and the many beautiful flowers. Again we wish to thank you all.
       Edward Emanuel
       Mr. and Mrs. Herman Krienke
       William Zech [WHE 02.] 
Emanuel, Walter Henry (I46)
 
40        Although the History of the Lakin Family, written by B. A. Lakin indicates Abigail was born about 1840, the actual date is June 17th, 1836. See Abigail Fuller (Lakin), Obituary, "Mrs. B. A. Lakin Dead," The Jewell Record, Jewell, Iowa, August 19, 1926. [AbgF 01.] Fuller, Abigail (I1952)
 
41        An attachment to the Welch Family History, "Moses Bates (December 23, 1740-March 31, 1781) - Hannah Norton" is reproduced here. I have not been able to verify the link between William and Hiram, Ann Bates Welch's father. Someone else might want to do that task.
       "Moses Bates, the great-grandfather of Anne Bates, was born in Abington, Massachusetts and died in Cummington, Massachusetts. Private Bates was a "minute man" who served in Capt. Wm. Reed's co., Colonel John Bailey's regiment which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775 and served with that regiment for eleven days. He later served with Capt. Edward Cobb's company, Col. Edward Mitchell's regiment for five days (March 4-9). On another "alarm," he marches to 'the Farms" at Braintree with Capt. Nathan Snow's Co., commanded by L. Christopher Dyer, Col. Mitchell's regiment, Feu.'s Brigade. Marched to Bristol, RI, Dec. 0, 1776 on an alarm and served sixteen days. [Taken from Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolution, Vol. I, p. 776.]
Moses and Hannah Norton Bates were married on November 29, 1761 and had six children: Moses, Jr., William (March 3, 1764-Sept. 4. 1848), Bennett, Nabby, Sarah, and Rachel. William was Anne Bates Grandfather and the father of Hiram Curtiss Bates (Dec. 14, 1799-June 15, 1875), her father. Hiram Bates lived in both Camden and Kipton, Ohio. Anne Bates married Bold Dighton Welch [cf Welch Family History].
       In the 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Anna [Bates] Welch is a 25 year old, white, married female. She is married to Bold Dighton Welch. Anna and Dighton live in Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio. She was born in New York State. [BDW 03.]
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Anna is the wife of B. D. Welch. She is a 34 year old, white female. She was born in New York state. She lives with her husband and four sons (Delos, Carlos, Harvey, and Lewis Marsac) in Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio. [BDW 04.]

Bio of Anna Bates (1828-1870)

Born: Camden, Lorain, Ohio, USA ?Born to: Hiram Curtis Bates and Eliza (Woodcock) Bates Family Anna Bates, d. 18 Jan 1870 ?Married 1 Nov 1847: Probably Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location ?Children:

1. Lewis Massac Welch, b. Abt 1846, Michigan
2. Hiram Delos Welch, b. 21 Jul 1850, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio d. 11 Apr 1908, Cass Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
3. Eliz Welch, b. Between 1850 and 1860, Probably Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio
4. Dighton Carlos Welch, b. 22 Jun 1856, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio d. 30 Dec 1935, Jewell, Iowa
5. Harvey B. Welch, b. Abt 1858, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio
6. Baby Boy Welch, b. 15 Jan 1870, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio d. 15 Jan 1870, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio

NOTES
       In the 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Bold Dighton Welch is a 21 year old white, married male. He is married to Anna (Bates). He is a farmer whose real estate is valued at $300. He was born in New York State. He lives with his wife, Anna, in Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio, near his father Samuel Welch and the rest of the Samuel Welch family.
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Bold Dighton Welch is a 31 year old, white male. He is a farmer with real estate valued at $900 and a personal estate valued at $200. He was born in New York State. He lives in Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio with his wife and four sons - Delos, Carlos, Harvey, and Lewis Marsac, near the Samuel Welch family.
       In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, B. D. Welch is a boarder with the Lorenzo H. Tozak family in Vernon Township, Humboldt County, Iowa. He is a 53 year old, white, widowed male. He is a farmer who was born in New York state of parents who were born in New York state. It is not clear what he is doing in Iowa at this time.
       In the Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Hamilton and Wright Counties, Iowa, [BDW 06], under H. D. Welch, there is a paragraph about Bold Dighton and Anna Welch:...D.B. Welch...was...a well-known pioneer of the county and a native of York state. The mother...was Anna (Bates) Welch, a native of New York State. The family left Huron County (Ohio) in 1854 and came to Linn county, Iowa, where they lived for two years and then returned to Ohio; here they resided until 1863, when they again returned to Iowa and located in Hardin County; later lived in Marshall County, and in 1868 came to Wright County, and settled on section 36, Woolstock township. ...[They] lived here for eighteen months and then returned to Ohio. the mother [Anna] died in Wakeman, Ohio, in 1870. The father now lives [1889] in Beadle county, Dakota.
       In the Welch Family family history, written by either Elsie or Barbara J. Welch, there are a couple of pages on Bold Dighton Welch, May 26, 1991, which are reproduced here. Bold Dighton grew up in Wakeman [Township, Huron County, Ohio] and eventually became a farmer and self-trained veterinarian. He married Anna Bates on November 01, 1847. She attended Oberlin College (1846-1847) and taught him to read and write. Anna Bates was also a descendant of Moses Bates, one of the "minute men" who marched to the aid of Concord in April of 1775. She came from New York. Like many another Victorian, She enjoyed the sentimental, often moralistic, poetry of the day.
       A copy of one favorite was carefully preserved by her husband in his copy of Dr. Chase's Recipes. It was to become a favorite of Elsie Welch Rushia who sang it while working around the house:

In a graveyard lonely, many miles away.
Lies your dear old mother 'neath the cold, cold clay.
Memories of her now returning of her tears and sighs,
If you love your mother, meet her in the skies.

Listen to her pleading, "wandering boy come home,
?Lovingly entreating, do not longer roam.
Let thy manhood waken, heaven ward lift thine eyes.
If you love your mother, meet her in the skies.

It continues in a similar manner for two more stanzas and choruses.

       They had one girl and six boys: Eliza, Dighton Carlos, Horace, Harvey ("Harvos"), Delos, and Lewis Massoc. A baby boy was still-born on January 15, 1870?

The history of these years is told rather sketchily by D. C. Welch in his "A little History of My Life" which he wrote in 1932. About 1860, Bold Dighton "traded his Ohio home for some land in Hardin County, Iowa near Eldora." Owing to Bold Dighton's ill health, he returned briefly to Ohio in 1866, leaving his family briefly in Marietta, Iowa. They, then, moved back to Ohio. the family later moved to Marshalltown, Iowa where Bold Dighton bought a one-acre lot. D. C. Welch began attending school there. D. C. Welch recalled:
       "My brother and sold garden stuff and we had a two-wheeled cart we hauled all over town. Also, I remember we got the malt from the brewery to feed the milk cow, and I can see the stock crunching down the barley. Of course there was a saloon on every corner." From Marshalltown, the family moved to Wright County, some twenty-five miles between Marshalltown and Clemans Grove. This move was made in a wagon with the cows "following along.
       "We had some frontier experiences on the Wright County farm which father traded his Marshalltown property for at four dollars an acre. I think we killed 28 rattlesnakes the year we moved through, breaking up the prairie. Also, I can see in my imagination a great flock of crows, chickens, ducks, and geese. Plovers, wild pigeons, snipes, and other wild birds. This was about 1867. We lived on the farm until about 1870 when father moved back to Ohio and we as a family followed up. That winter my mother died was the commencement of years of trouble and there has been plenty of it ever since.
       Anna Bates died on January 18, 1870, three days after giving birth to a still-born child.?Sometime later, Bold Dighton began courting other women, bouncing across the miles in a horse-drawn wagon. It was on one such excursion that he was started to find son Horace hiding in the wagon. Unfortunately, he had driven too far to turn back.?Bold Dighton became a self-taught veterinarian.
 
Bates, Anna (I1646)
 
42        An obituary was published in The Daily Freeman Journal in Webster City, IA, 09 November 1963.        It reads as follows:
       Frank W. House, 80 Dies in California; Rites to be Here
       Frank William House, 80, former Webster City resident, died Friday, November 01, in a hospital at San Bernadino, Calif.
       The body is expected to arrive in Webster City Monday night and will lie in state at the Foster funeral home. Funeral Services are pending and will be announced Monday.
       Frank William House, son of Michael and Julia House, was born May 12 1883, at Webster City where he was reared and educated.
       Mr. House was employed by the railroads and resided in this community for 40 years before moving to St. Paul where he resided for five years. He then went to Colorado where he homesteaded, living there until 1943 when he retired and moved to California.
       He is survived by two sister, Mrs. Anna Radlein of St. Paul and Mrs. Harry Cumpa of Bogota, N.J., and by several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, three brothers and one sister. [FH 01.] 
House, Frank William (I1926)
 
43        Anderson in the John Adams sketch [JAe 01] that there is no further record on Susan after the statement of birth: "b. after 22 May 1627; no further record."[DLL.] Adams, Susan (I2369)
 
44        Anyone who is interested in this Adams Family line to Reginald G. Adams (Son of Ira Adams) and Nedra Brewer should consult, Charlotte Schmidt at 16175 Cathy Loop, Peyton, CO 80831 or at Charlottesch@aol.com. Her book on this Adams family is entitled: SOME DESCENDANTS OF JESSE ADAMS, 1789-1844. There are pictures and other documents in this book that would be of extreme interest. [DLL]  Adams, Edmund (I1829)
 
45        At the point of entering information on Ebenezer Pierce (03/09/04), there is little known about Ebenezer Pierce. As usual in checking Ancestry.com, there is a lot of doubtful information or unconfirmed information relating to Ebenezer. Some reports suggest that he married a second time, a Mary Tilton; another indicated that his death was in 1766 in Attleboro, MA; there was even a first name, Elizabeth, given of his first wife. But none of this has been substantiated, at least by me. There are some leads, however. One of them is the records of the Second Congregational Church in Attleboro.
       The records of the Second Congregational Church in Attleboro [EBP 06] confirm, as stated in F.C. Pierce [EBP 04], that an Ebenezer Pierce was a member of this church. This membership was recorded as part of a group of "Members in full Communion." He is listed with "Benjamen Peirce, Ebenezer Peirce Jun, and Elizabeth Peirce, Deceased." It is not clear from the text when membership was granted. Thus, I have used the phrase, "after 1743" for that is when the church was established. While I have searched several town vital records, I have not been able to find a death date for Ebenezer, nor have I been able to find the name of his first wife, her birthplace, birth date, date of marriage, or date and place of death. The association with other Pierces in the record leads me to believe that this Ebenezer Pierce is the Ebenezer Pierce in this Pierce line, although there remains some doubt because no other records have been found in Attleboro.
       F.C. Pierce [EBP 04] says: "Ebenezer Pierce was born in Scituate, Mass., but moved to Attleboro, where he was a member of the Second Congregational Church in 1749. Attleboro was first settled in 1669 by John Woodcock, his house was the garrison and licensed in 1670. Many of the first settlers were from Rehoboth and Scituate, Mass. The town was originally called the "North Purchase," and incorporated in 1694." F.C. Pierce indicates two children: Benjamin and Ebenezer.
       In 1751, Ebenezer is received with his son, Benjamin, and Benjamin's wife, Elizabeth in the records of the First Church of Scituate, Massachusetts, according to a compilation of First Church Records, published in the 1909 volume (11, p. 141) of The Mayflower Descendant. [EBP 07.]
       In Wakefield, Robert S., Janice Beebe, et. al. (1991). Richard Warren of the Mayflower and his Descendants for Four Generations. Plymouth, MA: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, I did find reference to the marriage of Ruth Tilden and Ebenezer Pierce in 1752. There were no off-spring listed. [RT 02.] According to this same document, there are "No Plymouth Co. PR for Ebenezer Pierce." [RT 02.] 
Pierce, Ebenezer (I886)
 
46        At this point (2005), I hypothesize that John Drought is the husband of Lucretia Stanley. The evidence is circumstantial, yet plausible. From the 1856 Iowa State Census, I know that Lucretia is living with her mother; she has the last name of Drought; and she has a small daughter by the name of Sophia Drought. Drought as a last name is certain. In a 100th Anniversary Souvenir Program of the Methodist church, Webster City, Iowa, there is a sentence (page 2):
       "The first formal religious ceremony was a wedding solemnized in 1850 by Rev. Thompson Bird of Des Moines between a soldier from the barracks at Fort Dodge and Lucretia Stanley, a niece of the Brewers. Her father, "Uncle Billy Stanley, was probably a Methodist Exhorter." [JD 02.]
       It was my assumption, the Drought male being a soldier, that he must be in the 1850 U. S. Federal Census. And, that is where I found a John Drought, a soldier in a garrison, stationed in Boone County, Iowa. He was a 24 year old, white, male born in Ireland. [JD 01.] Unfortunately, I have not been able to find him elsewhere; nor have I been able to locate Lucretia Stanley Drought. I hypothesize that John Drought is the husband of Lucretia Stanley Drought and the father of Sophia Drought. [DLL.] This hypothesis is correct and there is now more information about John Drought, but it is still incomplete.
       In the 1852 Iowa State Census, John Drought appears in the Polk County, Cass Township Census with one other person, a female. It is my assumption that this female is his wife, Lucretia Stanley. In the census record there is an indication of an alien. It could be that John Drought is not a citizen of the U. S.  
Drought, John (I1108)
 
47        August C. Dehnke was married twice. In this compilation, I am only dealing with the marriage with Louise Sophie Rosentreter. Thus, the children from his first marriage will not be reported in this compilation, probably because they have less to do with the context of Linda M. Dehnke than anything else. [DLL.]
       In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, August C. Dehnke is a 46 year old, white, married male. He was born in Germany of parents who were both born in Germany. His occupation is that of farmer who is occupied 12 months during the year in that kind of work.. He owns his farm free and clear. August lives with his wife, Sophia and nine children: Linda, Adolph, August, Frieda, Sophia Ervin, and Margret Dehnke. The family lives in the town of Lincoln, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [DA 01.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, August C. Dehnke is a 41 year old, white, married male. He was born in Germany in August of 1858 of parents who were also both born in Germany. He is in a second marriage for 9 years. He immigrated to the United States in 1868. His occupation is that of farmer. He has not been unemployed. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He owns his home free and clear of any mortgage. August lives with his second wife, Sophia, and five children from the second marriage: Linda, Adolph, August, Frieda, Sophia. The family lives in Lincoln Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [DA 05.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, August C. Dehnke is a 51 year old, white, married female. He is in his second marriage. He is in the 20th year in his second marriage. He was born in Germany of parents who were both born in Germany. His native language is German. He immigrated to the United States in 1868 and is a naturalized citizen. August speaks, reads, and writes English. He owns his own farm free and clear. August lives with his wife, Louise Sophia, and eight children for his second marriage: Linda, Adolph, August, Frieda, Sophia, Irving, Margaret, Gertrude. The family lives in Lincoln Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [DA 04.] 
Dehnke, August C. (I2107)
 
48        BOY BOUND OVER TO GRAND JURY
       The Fifteen Year Old Lad Charged with Assault with Criminal Intent Is Held
       PARENTS FURNISH $500 BOND
       Crime Alleged to Have Been Committed on Little Eleven Year Old Jessie Ahrens
       Justice Hyatt this morning bound Frank Brewer over to await the action of the grand jury which meets May 1st, upon the charge of assault with criminal intent. The young man is but fifteen years of age. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roll Brewer of this city. The charge against him was preferred by Gus Ahrens, who charges that the crime was committed upon the person of his eleven year old daughter. Young Brewer's bond was fixed at $500, which was furnished by his parents.
The preliminary hearing was help before Justice Hyatt yesterday afternoon and concluded last evening. The decision, however, was withheld until this morning. Since the young man is not age a conviction upon the charge, serious though it is, can mean nothing more than a sentence to the reform school.
       It is alleged that the crime was committed last Tuesday afternoon. Jessie Ahrens, in company with a little Sweazey girl, was out in the woods picking flowers. They were back of the Brewer home in the west end of the city near the river. Frank Brewer, in company with an O'Rourke and a Butler boy, was also in the woods. It is charged that young Brewer chased the little Ahrens girl, caught her and threw her to the ground. It is then charged that he put his hand over her mouth, but was unable to check her terrifying screams. She finally broke away and upon reading home told her parents of the occurrence. The latter swore out an information against Brewer.
       So far as known the Brewer Boy has never before shown signs of viciousness and in school has always been considered rather bright for the chance that has been given him. His parents are poor and the lad has had to shift for himself a good deal. Like all boys under those conditions he has been a little wild. The seriousness of the charge now pending against him, however, is a surprise to his family. While the preliminary hearing developed very thorough investigation of the matter, the grand jury will go further into it. [FB 02.]
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Frank Brewer is a nine year old, single, white male. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Indiana (father) and Iowa (mother). He was born in September of 1890. In the home, there is also a boarder by the name of George Bonebright. [BRB 16.]
       In 1905, Frank Brewer is living in the Fourth Ward of Webster City, Iowa. He is living with his father, Benjamin R. Brewer and his mother, Ellen. They live on James. Street. [BRB 20.]
       In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, Frank Brewer is head of a family of four, including himself. With him are his wife Gladys M. (Jameson), a daughter, Ellen, and a son, Herbert. In the household is also Ruth Vielgomott, a widowed 65 year old, female who is the servant in the household. [Ruth was born in Illinois of parents who were born in Illinois (father) and Ohio (mother). She is competent in English.] Frank owns the home in which the family lives. The home is valued at $1,500. Frank is a white, married male; he is 40 years old and was first married at 31. He is not attending school, but can read, write, and speak English. He was born of parents who were born in Indiana (father) and Iowa (mother). He is an employed plasterer. He is a veteran of the WW. [FB 03.]
       FRANK BREWER DIES AT 75
       Frank Brewer, 75, lifelong resident of Webster city, died late Wednesday evening at the Veterans' hospital in Des Moines where he had been a patient the past seven weeks.
       Funeral services will be at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at the Foster Funeral home. There will be military services at graveside in Graceland cemetery.
Frank Brewer, son of Benjamin Rolland Brewer and Ellen Brewer, was born Sept. 5, 1889, at Webster City, and was reared and educated in this community.
       He was united in marriage May 18, 1921 to Gladys Jameson, and the couple had always since resided in Webster City where for many years Mr. Brewer engaged in the plastering trade.
       He is survived by his wife, two sons and two daughters; Herbert Brewer of Edwardsburg, Mich., Robert Brewer, Webster City, Mrs. Donald (Ellen) Peterson, Des Moines, and Mrs. Leo (Ruth) Hinderks, Webster City, and 13 grandchildren.
Mr. Brewer was preceded in death by one daughter, Ruby, who died at the age of eight months and by his parents. [FB 01.] 
Brewer, Frank (I1279)
 
49        By 1905, the Robert Lange family had moved from South Dakota to Wisconsin. It is my conjecture [DLL] that after marriage in Wisconsin, Emilie and Robert went to South Dakota to establish a homestead. When they had met homestead criteria, they probably sold the farm, moved back to Wisconsin, and bought a farm in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. This conjecture will need proof. Family F5
 
50        Donald W. Schlegelmilch, Sr., was a meat cutter. Dale Lange remembers that Don worked at Piggly Wiggly Stores in Eau Claire. Dale also remember that he was visiting Don and Loris in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and was present on the day that Don received his notice to go into the Army in World War II. He must have enlisted. During WW II, Loris and Don, Jr., went back to live on the farm with Art and Alma until the war was over and Don, Sr., returned. Then, this family moved back to Eau Claire, Wisconsin area to live.
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Donald W. Schlegelmilch is a three year old, white, single male. He was born in Wisconsin of parents who were born in Germany (father) and Wisconsin (mother). He is not yet in school. Donald lives with his parents, William and Edna, and a brother, Harold. The family lives at 312 Third Street, Ward 9, Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SWW 05.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Donald W. Schlegelmilch is a 13 year old, white, single male. He was born in Wisconsin of parents who were born in Germany (father) and Wisconsin (mother). He is in school and he reads, writes, and speaks English. He has no employment outside the home. Donald lives with his parents, William and Edna, and two siblings: Harold and Beverly. The family lives at 605 Gilbert Street in Ward 9, Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SWW 06.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Donald W. Schlegelmilch is a 23 year old, white, single male. He is not enrolled in school or college, but he has completed the second year of high school. He was born in the State of Wisconsin. He has lived in the same house since 1935. His occupation is that of clerk in an A&P Store, where he worked 50 hours prior to the week of the Census. He is considered a wage or salary worker in private business. In 1939, Donald worked 52 weeks during that year. His salary is $1000. He has no other income. Donald lives with his parents, William and Edna, and two siblings: Kenneth [Harold] and Beverly. The family lives at 605 Gilbert Street in Ward 9, Eau Claire, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. [SWW 07.]
       Here is his enlistment record:
Name: Donald W. Schlegelmilch
Birth year: 1916
Race: White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Country: Wisconsin
State of Residence: Wisconsin
County or City: Eau Claire
Enlistment Date: 8 Sep 1942
Enlistment State: Wisconsin
Enlistment City: Milwaukee
Branch: Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Branch Code: Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Grace: Private:
Grade Code: Private
Term of Enlistment: Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law.
Component: Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source: Civil Life
Education: 2 years of high school
Civil Occupation: Skilled meat cutters, except in slaughtering and packing houses
Marital Status: Married
Height: 66
Weight: 133 [DWSsr 06.]
       From the Eau Claire Public Schools Web site [DWSsr 02] comes this statement:
       DONALD W. SCHLEGELMILCH
       PROMOTED
Private First Class Don W. Schlegelmilch, whose wife lives at 512 1/2 Dodge Street, has been promoted to Corporal. He is now serving with the Third Division of the Fifth Army in Italy.
       Corporal and Mrs. Donald Schlegelmilch announce the birth of a son at Luther Hospital on December 22. Corporal Schlegelmilch is stationed in Italy.
 
Schlegelmilch, Donald W. , Sr. (I116)
 

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