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1751        Information on children of Nehemiah and Phoebe Lawrence is repeated in H.C. Pierce, Record of Births, Death, and Marriages [NP 03.] Although the towns of Westmoreland, NH, and Windham, VT are mentioned, a place of birth is not. I have found a published birth record for Nehemiah in Medford, MA [NP 10.]
       In the 1790 U.S. Federal Census, Nehemiah Pierce is listed as head of household in Londonderry, Windham County, Vermont, with one free, white male of 16 years and beyond, including head of family. In addition, there are two free, white males under 16, and two white females, including head of family. In the 1790 Census, he is listed next to Benjamin, the Benjamin that is assumed to be his brother.
       In the 1800 U.S. Federal Census, Nehemiah is listed on roll 867, but no page number is given and therefore no image was found.
       In the 1810 U.S. Federal Census, Nehemiah is listed as head of household in Windham, Windham County, Vermont. In addition, there is one free, white male under 10, two between the ages of 16 to 25, one between 25 and 44, and one over 45; this latter one is assumed to be Nehemiah. There are the following free, white females in the household: One under 10 years of age; one between 10 and 15; two between 16 and 24; and, one between the ages of 26 and 44; this latter female is considered to be Phoebe, Nehemiah's wife.
       Nehemiah Pierce was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He is listed in the DAR Patriot Index [NP11]. I do have his service record. [NP 04.]
If I read Nehemiah Pierce's Revolutionary War Record [NP 04] correctly, it shows that he enlisted in the 1st Battalion, New Hampshire Forces, in Capt. John House's Company, April 10, 1777 as a Pvt. The 1st Battalion was commanded by Col. Joseph Cilley. He was "Engaged under Cap Jn House for the term of 8 months," and was at "Camp near Londons Ferry, September 05,1777, on furlough, Sept, Oct, and Nov, 1777," probably wounded because of the Memorandum "of Sundry Orders from the Hon the General Court for allowance of Half, or other pay to wounded Officers & Soldiers." He was discharged January 10, 1778.
       The Westmoreland, New Hampshire History [NP 08] provides much of the same information that has already been included about Nehemiah, but there are a few details that are have not been found elsewhere:
-- He left his regiment during the Revolutionary War because he had been injured and was unfit for duty "so his life was much despaired." [
--During his sickness he lived with Benjamin Pierce in Westmoreland. His physician was Heber Miller.
--He removed from Westmoreland in 1787 [to Windham, Vermont].
       In the Vermont Historical Gazetteer [NP 09], as a member of the Congregational Church, Nehemiah was asked to participate in the selection of a pastor: "CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.
       In a town-meeting held on, April 12, 1797, the town voted to lease out the ministerial land by a desirable lease "while wood grows and water runs." Also to raise four cents a pound on the polls and ratable estate, to hire preaching the ensuing year, to be assessed on the invoice of 1797.''Voted that Den,. John Woodburn, Nehemiah Pierce and John Burnap be a committee to procure a candidate. We find no church record from this time until 1805, when the Congregational church was organized. After its organization, before Mr. Lawton was settled, Mr. Field, a licentiate, who afterwards became a lawyer, preached in the Congregational house. Mr. Gaius Conant was another, and Rev. Phineas Randall, neither of whom was willing to settle over so small a congregation. (20)"
       The History of Westmoreland indicates that Nehemiah was admitted to the church in Westmoreland in 1784 [NP 08.] 
Pierce, Nehemiah (I820)
 
1752        Instead of the marriage taking place in Pennsylvania as originally thought, it actually took place at Blackberry Station, De Kalb County, Illinois [DLL]. [AbgL 01.][BALa 07.] Family F271
 
1753        It is with the information of the Bayer Family Tree of Ancestry.com [Bayer Family Tree, Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/12839617/person/-172076070] that some of the information for Robert F. Bayer is given here, otherwise this information would not have been available; we give thanks to them here and to Ancestry.com. DLL.] In particular, his birth and death dates and places have been provided.
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Robert Fredrich Bayer is a 23 year old, white, single male. He was born in North Dakota of parents who were both born in Russia. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He has not attended school or college since September 01, 1929. His occupation is that of attendant at a service station. He is classified as a worker and was actually at work at the time of the census. His father, John E. Bayer is the owner of the service station; his mother is Katherina P. Bayer. I have not included the entire family in this compilation, but they are Emil Bayer (19), Edna Bayer (17), Herbert E. Bayer (15), and John A. Bayer (13). The entire family lives in Garrison, McLean County, North Dakota. [RFB 03.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Robert F. Bayer is a 33 year old, white, married male. He is married to Ruth E. Wacker. He was born in North Dakota. And, he has lived in the same place since April 1, 1935. He owns his own home, which is valued at $2,800. The family does not live on a farm. Robert has not attended school or college since March 1, 1940, but he has completed three years of high school. He was at work for pay in private business as the proprietor of a plumbing and heating business during the week of March 24, 1940. He worked 48 hours during that week. During 1939, he earned $520 [if I read the record correctly - difficult to read]. Robert lives with his wife, Ruth, and two children (Burton and Marlyne), as well as a boarder, Beuford Young. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County, North Dakota. [RFB 04.]
 
Bayer, Robert Fredrich (I2685)
 
1754        It would be easy for me to expand on this family through sources on Ancestry.com. But, I will not do so. It is possible that Patrick Fraikes had two wives: Elizabeth Morrow, m. 1819; and, Ann Jakeway, m. 1845. The marriage with Elizabeth may have produced the following children: Patrick, William, Eliza Jane, Harriet E. Andrew J., Matilda, and Walter. Two children, Samuel W. and Betsy, could be the offspring of the second marriage to Ann Jakeway. Since I do not trust Ancestry.com. sources other than simply leads, I will not include the wives and divide up the children accordingly. That action will have to wait until I have more "proof."
       In the 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Patrick Fraikes, his wife Anna, and nine children (Eliz Jane, Harriet E. Andrew J., Matilda, Walter B., Samuel W., Betsy, John, and William) are living in Logan County, Illinois - a specific town or township was not recorded. Patrick, a white, married male, is 51 (?) years old. He is a farmer and was born in Pennsylvania. [PF 01.]
       In the 1856 Iowa State Census, Patrick Frakes is a 57 year old, white, married male who has lived in the state of Iowa for 2 years. He is a farmer who was born in Pennsylvania. He is a native of the U. S. He lives with his wife, Anna, and a daughter, Eliza J., in Cass Township, Webster County, Iowa. [PF 04.]
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Patrick Fraikes, his wife Anna, and six children (Elizabeth J., Walter, Samuel W., John, Betsy, and Robert S.) are living in Cass Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. Patrick is a 61 year old, white male - a farmer. His real estate is valued at $2,400 and his personal estate at $1,000. He was born in Ohio (?). [PF 02.]
       In the 1870 U. S. Federal Census, Patrick Fraikes [Frakes] is a 72 year old, white, married male. He is married to Anna Jacoway. He is a farmer with a real estate valued at $2,800 and personal property valued at $950. He was born in Pennsylvania and is older than 21 years of age, thereby entitled to vote. He lives with his wife, Anna, and a son, Robert L., in Cass Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [PF 05.] 
Fraikes, Patrick (I1247)
 
1755        James, born August 20, 1829, was married to Amanda Allen, of New York, and they too sought a home in Iowa at about the same time the Soop family arrived. In Webster City they located, and Mrs. Wiltsey, his widow, is still living here, her husband having died on the 16th of October, 1883. In their family were seven children. [SpW 01.]
       In the 1860 U. S. Federal Census, James Wiltsey is a 32 year old, married male. By occupation, he is a farmer. The value of his real estate is $825 and the value of his personal property is $200. He lives with his wife, Amanda Allen Wiltsey and a daughter, Clarissa. The family lives in the Town of Worcester, Otsego County, State of New York. [JW 04.]
       In the 1865 New York State Census, James Wiltsey is a 36 year old, white, married male. He is in his first marriage. His occupation is that of farmer. He is allowed to vote. He owns the land on which he farms. James lives with his wife, Amanda Allen Wiltsey and three children: a daughter, Clarissa and two sons: Delevan and Josiah. The family lives on a farm near Worcester, Otsego County, New York. [JW 03.]
       In the 1870 U. S. Federal Census, James Wiltsey is a 40 year old, white, married male. He was born in New York State. His occupation is that of laborer. The record indicates that he cannot read or write, but that he is a male citizen of 21 years of older, indicating that he probably can vote. He is married to Amanda Allen. He lives with his wife, Amanda, with three sons (Delevan, Josiah, Wesley) and with two daughters (Clarissa, Mary) in Webster City, Hamilton county, Iowa. [JW 01.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, James Wiltsey is a 52 year old, white, married male. He is married to Amanda Allen. He was born in New York of parents who were both born in New York State. His occupation is that of laborer. He lives with his wife, Amanda, and seven children: two daughters (Clarissa, Mary), and five sons (Josiah, Wesley, Edgar, Charley, unnamed baby) in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [JW 02.] 
Wiltsey, James (I2585)
 
1756        James, born August 20, 1829, was married to Amanda Allen, of New York, and they too sought a home in Iowa at about the same time the Soop family arrived. In Webster City they located, and Mrs. Wiltsey, his widow, is still living here, her husband having died on the 16th of October, 1883. In their family were seven children. [SpW 01.]
James, born August 20, 1829, was married to Amanda Allen, of New York, and they too sought a home in Iowa at about the same time the Soop family arrived. In Webster City they located, and Mrs. Wiltsey, his widow, is still living here, her husband having died on the 16th of October, 1883. In their family were seven children. [SpW 01.]
       In the 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Amanda Allen is an 11 year old, white, single female. She was born in New York. She lives with her parents, Margaret Russ and Justin E. All, and several siblings: Edwin, John, Samuel, Ezra, Elbert, Mary, Margaret, and Anna Allen. The family lives in the Town of Gilboa,Schoharie County, New York. [AJE 01.]
       In the 1860 U. S. Federal Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 22 year old, married female. She is married to James Wiltsey. Her occupation is that of housekeeper. She lives with her husband and a daughter, Clarissa. The family lives in the town of Worcester, Otsego County, New York State. [JW 04.]
       In the 1865 New York State Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 27 year old, white, married female. She is married to James Wiltsey. She was born in Otsego County, New York. She has given birth to three children. She lives with her husband, James Wiltsey and their three children: Clarissa, Delevan and Josiah Wiltsey. The family lives on a farm near Worcester, Otsego, New York. [JW 03.]
       In the 1870 U. S. Federal Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 31 year old, white, married female. She is married to James Wiltsey. She was born in New York State. Her occupation is that of keeping house. She lives with her husband, James, two daughters (Clarissa, Mary), and three sons ( Delevan, Josiah, and Wesley) in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [JW 01.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 42 year old, white, married female. She is married to James Wiltsey. She was born in new York State of parents who were both born in Connecticut. Her occupation is that of keeping house. She lives with her husband, James, and seven children: two daughters (Clarissa, Mary) and five sons (Josiah, Wesley, Edgar, Charley, unnamed baby). They all live in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [JW 02.]
       In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 47 year old, white, widowed female. She was born in New York State Abt. 1838. She lives in Webster City, Hamilton Count, Iowa with five of her children,four sons and one daughter: Josiah, Mary, Wesley, Charles, and Edgar Wiltsey. [ALA 02.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 60 year old, white, widowed female. She was born in 1938 in New York State of parents who were also both born in New York State. She has given birth to 12 children, seven of whom are still living. She reads, writes, and speaks English. Amanda is living with her son Edgar, and his wife Amy; in addition, her son Josiah and his two children Frank and Laura are also in the home. The family is living in Maxwell, Meade County, South Dakota. [WEE 03.]
       In the 1905 South Dakota State Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 67 year old widow, who was born in New York State in 1838. She arrive in South Dakota in 1903 and has live there for two years. This Census Record does not provide any further information as to why she is there and there is no digital picture either. [ALA 03.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 70 year old, white, widowed female. She has given birth to 12 children, seven of whom are still living. She was born in New York of parents born in Connecticut (father) and New York (mother). She reads, writes, and speaks English. Her employ is that of housekeeping for a private family. She lives with her son, Josiah, and a grandson, Frank. The family lives in Township 5 north, range 16, Pennington County, South Dakota. [WJ 01.]
       In the 1915 Iowa State Census, Amanda Allen Wiltsey is a 76 year old, widowed female. She was born in New York of parents who were also born in New York State. She reads and writes, and most likely speaks English. She finished 8 grades of common school. Amanda is retired; She is a Methodist by church affiliation. She does not own her own home or farm. She obviously lives alone in Fremont Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [ala 01.] 
Allen, Amanda (I2586)
 
1757 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I213)
 
1758        Lois and Merle, the latter a twin of Kenneth, died approximately two minutes apart in the Wahpeton, North Dakota Hospital of pneumonia. Kenneth was just one year old when he too died of the same cause. There is a single Remembrance Book, presented by the Foster Funeral Home in Webster City, Iowa for both Lois and Merle. It remains with Dale L. Lange at 2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503.
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Lois, a daughter of Frank O. and Mabel Pierce, is an 11 year old, white, single female. She is going to school and can read, write, and speak English. She was born in Minnesota of parents, both of whom were born in Iowa. She has no profession. [FOP 08.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Lois J. Pierce is a 21 year old, white, single female. She was born in Minnesota (census data indicates Iowa) of parents who were born in Iowa. She reads, writes, and speaks English. She does not have an employ outside the home. She lives with her parents, Frank and Mabel, a brother, Merle, and two farm laborers, Mike Stomberg and Joe Trostie, in Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota. [FOP 12.]
       Lois died January 23, 1931; a notice of the funeral was placed in the Daily Freeman Journal of Webster City on Saturday, January 24, 1931 indicating that the funeral would be held on Tuesday, January 27, 1931 with burial in Graceland Cemetery. [LP 06.]
       The Daily Freeman Journal also published a short article on the arrival of Lois' body in Webster City, Iowa and again announced the funeral with local relatives. [LP 07.]
       The Gazette-Telegram, Breckenridge, Minnesota (Wednesday, January 28, 1931) offered the headline to an article:
       PNEUMONIA CLAIMS BRO. AND SISTER 3 MINUTES APART: Lois Josephine and Merle Frank, children of Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Pierce, Victims of Disease: Services Held Sunday From Baptist Church: Burial at Webster City, Iowa, Tuesday - Four in Family Die of Same Disease. [The part of the article that concerns Lois is reproduced here; that for Merle appears under Merle; for the whole family appears under Frank O. Pierce.]
       "Lois Josephine Pierce was born in Breckenridge on April 29, 1910, and was 20 years, 8 months and 25 days old at the time of her death. She was educated in the rural schools of the county and also graduated from the Breckenridge high School. To know Lois was to love her, she was gifted with a personality that drew friends to her. She attended the First Baptist church of this city, and was very active in church activities. Breckenridge has truly lost one of its fine examples of a girl that represented the best in American womanhood. May of our readers will recall Lois as the young lady who attended their many wants in the secretary's office of the Wilkin county fair last year. Always smiling and making sure that everything was as the exhibitor wished it to be. Lois was a daughter that any household would be proud to call their daughter." [LP 02.] 
Pierce, Lois Josephine (I399)
 
1759        Luther Lakin was twelve years old when his father moved to Illinois. When he was twenty-one years old he went north to the lumber regions and remained three years. He then returned to DeKalb County, and preceded his father to Iowa by a few days, thus sharing with him the honor of being the first settler of Lyon Township. He located on the land which is now his pleasant homestead, owning 224 acres of choice land, known as the Lakin Grove stock-farm, all under cultivation with good building improvements. He makes a specialty of raising thoroughbred Durham cattle, and has some of the finest animals in the county. Mr. Lakin is a prominent man in the township, and has held several local official positions, and for several years was a member of the county board of supervisors. He is a member of the order of the Knights of Labor. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. [LL01.] See also Lee, J. W. (1912.) History of Hamilton County Iowa, Volume 1, Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, p.47.
       FIRST SETTLEMENT ON THE SKUNK RIVER
       The first settlements made in this county away from the Boone river, were made at Lakin's Grove on the Skunk river. In the fall of 1854, Luther Lakin, Elisha Lakin, Dr. Cochran, and Oscar M. Lakin, came to Hamilton county, entered land lying on the Skunk river, and returned east. In the spring of 1855, Luther Lakin left home, intending to get married and meet his father and other settlers on the Skunk, but he arrived about two weeks earlier than the rest and can therefore lay just claim to being the first settler in the east part of the county and in Lyon township. About two weeks after his arrival Elisha Lakin, B. A. Lakin, and E. P. McCowan came and all settled near each other. The men turned in and helped Mr. McCowan to build a cabin, which was the first house built in that part of the county. McCowan moved into his new house and shortly afterwards Evaline McCowan was born, being the first white child born in the east half of the county. The next house built was Luther Lakin's, which stood about a half mile west of his present residence. The house was not built until about three months after his arrival. In the meantime, the cooking was done on a stove in a bark shanty, and they slept in the covered wagon
Elisha Lakin put up the next house, and it remains yet on the farm of Palmer Tatham, having been used for many years as a stable. In the fall of the same year, Geo. and Henry Staley moved in a took a claim about four miles south of Lakin's Grove in what is now Ellsworth township and so far as we have been able to learn, these were the only settlers in the east of the country prior to the year 1856.
       In Lee's volume one of the History of Hamilton County, Iowa, Luther is elected to the position of county coroner. In 1857, it appears that Luther Lakin was also elected coroner of Hamilton County. However, when the returns were certified, Elisha Lakin appeared after the election and qualified for the office of coroner. It is probably that the transcript of the election was in error. See Lee, History of Hamilton County, Iowa, p. 66.
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Luther Lakin is a farmer in Clear Lake Township, Hamilton County, Iowa, near Webster City. He is 29 years of age, white, and a farmer with $3,000 in real estate and $300 in personal property. He was born in Pennsylvania. [LL 02.] With him are Emily who is 22, born in Maine; Noah, 4, born in Iowa and going to school; Norman, 3, born in Iowa, Willard, 2, born in Iowa, and Augusta, 6 mos., born in Iowa. The child, Augusta, does not appear in LL 01.
       In the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Luther Lakin is a 38 year old, white, married male. He is a farmer with $4,000 in real estate and $1,300 in personal estate. He was born in Pennsylvania and is a U.S. citizen older than 21 years. He is married to Emily. With him are eight children: Noah, Norman, Millard, Gustavus, Nina, Alpheas, Mary and Nancy. [LL 05.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Luther Lakin is a 50 year old, white, married male. His occupation is farming. He was born in Pennsylvania of parents who were born in Massachusetts (father) and Pennsylvania (mother). He is married to Emily Staples. They live in Lyon Township, Hamilton County, Iowa with 11 children: Norman, Willard, Gustavus, Alphaus, Mary, Hattie, Minona, Fred, Jessie, Bessie, and Frances: five girls and six boys. [LL 06.]
       In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Luther Lakin is a 53 year old, married, male, born in Pennsylvania. He lives in Lyon Township, Hamilton County, Iowa: Township 87, range 24, section 24, SE SE. He is entitled to vote. [LL 08.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Luther Lakin, the head of the household, is a 70 year old, white, married male. He was been married for 46 years to Emily Staples Lakin. His name is spelled wrong (Laken) in the index for the Census in Lyon Township, Hamilton County, Iowa, where he lives with his wife, Emily, and two children (Jesse, a son, and Dolly, a daughter). He was born in Pennsylvania of parents that were born in Massachusetts (father), and Pennsylvania (mother). He is a farmer, who owns his own farm by means of a mortgage. He reads, writes, and speaks English. [LL 09.]
       [According to the article, "Luther Lakin," Biographical and Portrait Album of Hamilton and Wright Counties, Iowa. Chicago: Lewis Biographical Publishing Company, 1889, p. 279 [LL 01], there were fifteen children in the Luther Lakin family, including Alma, Emily, and Harry. I have been able to document the following: Noah, Norman, Willard, Augusta, Nancy, Gustavus, Perlina, Alpheus, Mary, Hattie, Frederick, Minona, Bessie, Jessie, Frances, and Dolly. In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Emily Lakin indicates that she had 16 children, 15 of whom are no longer living. Thus, I hypothesize that the three children listed in the Luther Lakin article are not children of Luther Lakin and Emily Staples Lakin. Thus, I have removed Alma, Emily, and Harry from the list of this family's progeny. DLL]
       It appears that the Elisha Lakin Obelisk in Homewood Cemetery, Elwood, Iowa, may be in a family plot. There are other names on it. One of them, I believe is Noah, the son of Luther Lakin. I have placed the pictures with Cynthia Ainesly Lakin. [DLL.]
 
Lakin, Luther (I614)
 
1760        Maila was the youngest of three children born to James Churchill and Maila Harwood. [IBS 01.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Minnie or Maila Churchill Smith, is a 47 year old, white, married female. She has been married to Isaac B. Smith for 27 years. She has given birth to three children of which two are living at this time. Maila was born in Michigan of parents who were both born in Ohio. She reads, writes, and speaks English. She lives with her husband, Isaac, a son-in-law, Frank Seamonds, who is married to a daughter of Isaac and Maila, namely Mamie, and a grandson, Floyd S. Pierce, son of Isabel Smith and Charles Pierce, both of whom died of typhoid fever. [FSP 03.]
       As she was listed, Maila, the wife of Issac B. Smith, was white,57 years of age, and married for 37 years in the 1910 U.S. Federal Census. She had been born in Michigan; her father had been born in Michigan and her mother had been born in Vermont. Maila spoke, read, and wrote English. [IBS 02.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, eight years prior to her death, Maila Churchill Smith is a 67 year old, white, married female. She is married to Isaac B. Smith. She has no employ outside the home. She was born in Michigan of parents who were born in Ohio (father) and Vermont (mother ?). She lives with her husband, Isaac, in the household of Emma, their daughter, and Edward (son-in-law), three grandchildren Nedra and Alten Brewer, as well as Floyd S. Pierce, in Independence Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [EWB 06.] 
Churchill, Rhoda Maila (I606)
 
1761        Merle and Lois died approximately two minutes apart in the Wahpeton, North Dakota Hospital of pneumonia. Merle was a twin of Kenneth Pierce. Kenneth was just one year old when he too died of the same cause. There is a single Remembrance Book, presented by the Foster Funeral Home in Webster City, Iowa for both Merle and Lois. It remains with Dale L. Lange, 2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503.
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Merle, a son of Frank O. and Mabel Pierce, is a 7 year old, white, male who is attending school. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He was born in Minnesota of parents, both of whom were born in Iowa. He has no profession. [FOP 08.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Merle Frank Pierce is an eighteen year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota (census data indicates Minnesota) of parents who were both born in Iowa. He reads, writes, and speaks English. His occupation is that of laborer in general farming (he works for his father). He was at work at the time of the census. He lives with his parents, Frank and Mabel, a sister, Lois, and two farm laborers, Mike Stomberg and Joe Trostie, in Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota. [FOP 12.]
       Merle died January 23, 1931; a notice of the funeral was placed in the Daily Freeman Journal of Webster City on Saturday, January 24, 1931 indicating that the funeral would be held on Tuesday, January 27, 1931 with burial in Graceland Cemetery. [MP 04.]
       The Daily Freeman Journal also published a short article on the arrival of Merle's body in Webster City, Iowa and again announced the funeral with local relatives. [MP 05.]
       The Gazette-Telegram, Breckenridge, Minnesota (Wednesday, January 28, 1931) offered the headline to an article:
       PNEUMONIA CLAIMS BRO. AND SISTER 3 MINUTES APART: Lois Josephine and Merle Frank, children of Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Pierce, Victims of Disease: Services Held Sunday From Baptist Church: Burial at Webster City, Iowa, Tuesday - Four in Family Die of Same Disease. [The part of the article that concerns Lois is reproduced here; that for Merle appears under Merle; for the whole family appears under Frank O. Pierce.]
       Merle Frank Pierce was born in Breckenridge on April 12, 1912 and was 18 years, 8 months and 8 days old at the time of his death. He attended the rural schools of the county and also the Breckenridge high school. Merle was a chap who differed greatly from his sister Lois, as he was inclined to be bashful. He wanted to make friends but his was a character that made this not very easy. He always impressed us as a boy who studied you deeply before becoming your friend, one he had placed his faith in you, you were enriched with a true friendship. Merle was also a member of the First Baptist Sunday school in which activities he took a very active part. No where could a person hope to find a finder example of true American manhood. To [sic] bad that death had to cut short the life of one who possessed everything that goes to make such a good American citizen. [LP02.] 
Pierce, Merle Frank (I398)
 
1762        Mildred R. Pierce [Lange] was one of the younger Frank O. Pierce children. Like her husband, Max, little is known of her person in childhood or as a teenager. None of the people who could inform us of those times are living. But, she was a beautiful teenager and young adult (See pictures in Scrapbook). As an adult, she was determined to succeed. After finishing high school, she went on to two years of college to become a teacher. She did not want to teach in a small rural school, as her mother did; she wanted to be in a bigger city. However, she did teach in Granite Falls, Minnesota, in the East Side School. After having this experience, she did go on to teach in the Downers Grove Public Schools near Chicago. But, after a couple of years, she returned to Granite Falls, Minnesota. Shortly thereafter, she and Max Lange were married.
       As a mother, she was fairly strict. She had a vision of how children should behave and she expected that kind of behavior. At least that is how Dale Lange perceives the situation. She was the person in the family who delivered punishment when it was needed. But, she was in her own way, a loving person. She did not always demonstrate affection, but it was there, sometimes coming out unexpectedly. She loved her parents, especially her father, Frank. She grieved for a long time after his death. And, she loved her children and had high expectations for them. She also expected that they would pull their weight in the household and in the grocery store that she and Max built in the front of a house on Granite Street in Granite Falls, Minnesota. The children learned to clean house, wash and iron clothes, and make rudimentary meals. "What will you do if you don't have a wife?" she would say. And, in the grocery store, Merle and Dale waited on customers during the noon hour, while eating lunch so that Mildred could have some time off. And, after school and evenings, customers in the store were mingled with homework and other school requirements.
       Mildred also wanted her children to succeed in school. She worked with Dale and Merle on homework, allowed them to participate in certain after school activities such as band, chorus, and piano and voice lessons (mostly Dale). She checked regularly with the children's teachers to ascertain progress and problems. She wanted her children to attend college if that was their wish.
       Mildred knew that work was important in life. Because the children were born in the Great Depression and money was very limited, she worked different jobs - in an ice cream store, in a bakery, and in "her" grocery store. Modeling this value, she passed it on to her children.
       From her children's perspective, Mildred was a complex and serious person. Yet, she doted on her grandchildren when they arrived. She enjoyed their simplicity greatly. And, after the store was sold, she and Max went to Arizona almost every winter for about a decade. There she painted, crocheted, and worked on other craft- and art-like projects. Her art hangs in both the children's homes.
       In the 1910 U.S. Federal census, Mildred, a daughter of Frank O. and Mabel Pierce, is a three year old, white, single, female. She was born in Minnesota of parent both of whom were born in Iowa. She is living with four other siblings: Gladys, Ralph, Glen, and Leta. She is obviously not in control of the English language. [FOP 09.]
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Mildred, a daughter of Frank O. and Mabel Pierce, is a 13 year old, white, single, female. She is going to school and can read, write, and speak English. She was born in Minnesota of parents, both of whom were born in Iowa. She has no profession. [FOP 08.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Mildred Pierce, is a 23 year old, white, single female. She was born in Minnesota of parents who were both born in the United States, so says the Census Record. Both of her parents were born in Iowa. She reads, writes and speaks English. She is employed and is working as a teacher in a public school. She has not attended school or college since Sept 1, 1929. She is living as a lodger with the Ingvald P. Flaten family in Granite Falls, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. [MRP 18.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Mildred Ruth Pierce Lange is a 31 year old, white, married female. She is married to Max Lange. She was born in Minnesota. and has lived in Minnesota since 1935. She has not attended school in 1940, but has completed two years of college. She is not employed; she is a housewife. Mildred is living with her husband, Max, and two sons, Dale and Merle Roger in Granite Falls, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. [ML 25.] 
Pierce, Mildred Ruth (I3)
 
1763        More stories will be told about Max in the family history, but these are some things in which people might be interested.
       Name: Although his baptismal certificate reads, Max Paul Lange, Max never used the middle name. When asked if he had a middle name, he would always answer, yes, REX, meaning King. Of course, this was teasing. I, Dale, want to honor his choice of using Max Lange instead of Max Paul Lange. It was his choice and there must have been a reason. Could it have been because he had an older brother whose first name was Paul? Was it because he did not like the name of Paul? We will never know because he is no longer here to ask. But whenever he is referred to, I would hope that his name is Max Lange. That is sufficient. Please honor the name he used.
       Education: While at least at the present time, there is no documentation, Max persisted in saying that he only had a fourth grade education. Others indicated that he quit school after the 8th grade.
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Max is living with his parents in Wentworth township, Lake County, South Dakota. He is only eight months old, having been born in October of 1899. He lives with his parents and five siblings: Ella, Art, Otto, Paul, and Walter. He is a white, single male. His parents were born in Germany of German parents. [RL 07.]
       In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Max Lange is a five year old, white, single male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were both born in Germany. He lives with his parents, Robert and Emilie, one sister, Ella, and five brothers (Arthur, Otto, Paul, Walter, and Armin [Armie]) in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 12.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Max Lange is a 10 year old, white, single male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were born in Germany. He reads, writes, and speaks English and is still going to school. He lives with his parents, Robert and Emilie, in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 09.]
       In 1917 or 1918, the World War I Draft Registration Card [ML 22] shows Max in Havana, North Dakota. The draft card is difficult to read so it is not clear what he is doing. Since the area of Havana, Sargent County, North Dakota is an area of few towns and since Max had grown up on a farm, it is logical to think that he is working in some kind of farm industry. Merle Lange, the brother of Dale, believes that Max went "out west" to earn money to go to Barber School. This evidence indicates that at least he went to North Dakota. Below is the information on the registration card:
REGISTRATION CARD
Name: Max Lange
Permanent Address: RFD1, Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin
Age: 18
Date of Birth: October 02, 1899
Race: White
U. S. Citizen: Native Born
Occupation: Laborer on Threshing Machine
Employer's Name: J. P. Weber
Place of Employment: Havana Sargent County, North Dakota
Nearest Relative: Robert Lange
Address: RFD1, Fairchild, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin
Added Information: Receive mail at Havana, North Dakota, General Delivery
REGISTRAR'S REPORT
Description
Height: Medium
Build: Medium
Color of Hair: Brown [ML 23.]
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Max Lange is living with his parents and one brother. He is white, male, 20 years old, and single. He has not attended school since September 1, 1919, but that does not mean that he had attended school anytime recent to 1919. He speaks, reads, and writes English. He was born in South Dakota; his parents were born in West Prussia and speak German as well as English. He is a farm laborer and the W probably stands for wage worker.
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Max Lange is a 28 year old (? - born in 1899), white, single male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were both born in Germany. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He is not in school. He is a barber who owns his own shop. He was at work at the time of the census. He is not a veteran of any U. S. Military expedition. Max is a roomer in the household of Francis McGraw. In this household are Dorothy McGraw, her son, ??? J. Melby, Ove Prestegaard, and N. Edward Nelson. [ML 24.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Max Lange is a forty year old, white, married male. He is married to Mildred Ruth Pierce. The census indicates that he was born in Wisconsin, but that is erroneous; he was born in South Dakota. He has not attended any school in 1940. He did attend eight years of school. He rents a home on Prentice Street in Granite Falls for $14 a month. He has lived in the same place, that is Granite Falls since 1935. He was at work to make profit from his own employment. He works approximately 60 hours a week, 52 weeks a year as proprietor of a barbershop. He does not receive wages, but receives incomes from money earned other than wages. He lives with his wife, Mildred, and two sons, Dale and Merle Roger, in Granite Falls, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. [ML 25.]
       Occupation: Max probably had more than one occupation. As a child, he most likely worked on the farm. But, sometime in the late 19-teens or early 1920s, most likely, Max went to Barber School in either Minneapolis or St. Paul. He once told his son, Dale, that he had worked in the stock yards in South St. Paul to earn money to go to barber school. Max was a barber in Granite Falls some time in the 1920s until the mid-1970s. In the late 1940s, he and Mildred purchased a house on Granite Street, not far from US 212 and built a store on the front of the house. After Mildred's father, Frank Pierce died in 1951, Max was offered the opportunity to buy the farm near Breckenridge, Minnesota. But, he knew that he was probably too old to take on such responsibility. In the mid-1970s, Max and Mildred sold the house and the store and retired.
       Death: Max died in the early hours of July 19, 1990, about 36 hours after Mildred; she died on July 17, 1990. He made arrangements for her funeral with Mary Lange (Merle's wife], talked with neighbors, and had dinner with his friends, the Able's. He died in his sleep most likely in the early morning. The death certificate indicates death at 7:30 a.m., but he probably died before that.
       Probate:The probate of the wills of Max and Mildred were handled extremely efficiently by Mary Lou (Nyberg) Lange, Merle's wife. Those papers are included in ML 14.
       Places of Residence: Max and Mildred lived on Prentice Street in the Oscar Anderson home on the second floor. They also lived in a duplex on Prentice, the Dolan Family living next door. And, they lived on a duplex Ninth St. as well. They purchased a home near the intersection of Granite Street and Highway 212, Lot Nine (9) of Block Forty-One (41) of Pillsbury's Second addition to the City of Granite Falls. [See Contract for Deed of ML 15.] A neighborhood grocery store was built on the front of the house. That lot has been purchased by a cooperative gas station, Cenex, and has gasoline pumps on it. The house was torn down. After they sold the store, they purchased a house on Eighth Ave., the house of Dale's high school English teacher, Anna Feley. That house was at 270 Eighth Avenue, Lot Fourteen (14) of Block Thirty-one (31) of the Original Plat of the City of Granite Falls. [See Quit Claim Deed of ML 16.] After the death of Max and Mildred, the house was rented out for a while and then sold. It is no longer in the hands of the Lange Family.
       There are no real records of the time that Max left home and where he lived and worked prior to his marriage to Mildred R. Pierce. However, in working through his papers, Dale found two insurance policies that give an indication that he lived in Minneapolis in 1924 and had moved on to Granite Falls by 1930. [See ML 17.] The Equitable Life Insurance Policy original application (beneficiary, Robert Lange) indicated that he lived at 18 Grove Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota. [See ML 18 for map; located on Hennepin Island.]

Max wrote one poem in his life:

I believe that hope, faith and prayer is the
Spirit of love.
That's why you all love to read, write and
sing about love.
You can't change the sun, moon or the stars,
and you can't change love.
Your heart might break, times might change or
we might change
but love will still prevail.

Joseph loved Mary,
Dad loves Mom
and mom loves little Sue,
That's why love is so divine.
Love lasts from the cradle to eternity.
Love is like a beautiful dream come true
so let's not let our love grow cold.
To be sure life would get dull;
now let's all join in with the Spirit of
love and sing
"Love is wonderful, love is beautiful, love is
heavenly."
Yes, love leadeth us to that beautiful home in
heaven.
Isn't love just wonderful? [See ML 22.] 
Lange, Max (I2)
 
1764        Nellie Mae (Pierce) Cole was named after the daughter of William H. Pierce and Maria Burton that died at an early age and is buried in the South Windham Cemetery. See PW 01, p. 04.
       Birth Certificate spells Nellie's middle name as May [NMP 01]; Nellie spells it Mae [NMP 02]. In this document, the middle name is spelled according to Nellie's wishes.
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, Nellie Mae Pierce is a two year old, white, single female. She was born in Minnesota of parents who were born in Iowa (father) and Illinois (mother). She lives with her parents, Ernest and Clara, and one sister, Audrey, in Nordick Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota. She has lived in Minnesota and this township for two years and one month. [ErnstP 06.]
       In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Nellie Mae Pierce is living with her parents, Clara and Ernest Pierce in Breckenridge, Wilkin County, Minnesota with two other siblings: Audrey and Harry Pierce. Nellie is female, white, single, and six years old. She was born in Minnesota of parents who were born in Iowa (father) and Illinois (mother) respectively. [ErnstP 04.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Nellie Mae Pierce is a 26 year old, white, married female. She is married to Albert R. Cole. She was married when she was 18 years of age. She reads, writes, and speaks English. She was born in Minnesota of parents who were born in Iowa (father) and Illinois (mother). She has no employ outside the home. She lives with her husband, Alfred, and two sons, Robert R. and Albert W., in Sterling City, Ward 2, Logan County, Colorado. [ARC 04.]
       Nellie was Worthy Matron of the Garden City Chapter #3 of the Order of Eastern Star at the same time that Albert was Worthy Patron. Nellie also sang in her church choir for many years and served on many church boards of the Fist Presbyterian Church of LaSalle, Colorado. [NMP 02.]
       After locating Nellie through genealogical research, Estella and I went to visit with her in LaSalle, CO. This visit was prior to the 100th birthday in 2003; we might have visited in 2001or 2002 or both, I simply do not remember any longer. I recollect it was more than one prior time. We also attended the 100th birthday celebration. It was truly a celebration of Nellie's life with her living children (a son, Robert, had died earlier), grandchildren, and great grandchildren. And, what a joy to be in her presence! Nellie was an exceptionally welcoming person with open arms and open heart. She had books to discuss, stories to tell, wisdom to give, and love to share. She always looked forward to the next visit or phone call. For me, she was the link to William Henry Pierce, whose daughter Nellie H. Pierce died when she was five years old, nearing six. Nellie Mae was named after Nellie H. at the request of William Henry. Thus, Nellie Mae Pierce Cole's life reached beyond the 104+ years of her life into the1860s - to a great grandfather for me, and his daughter that he obviously adored, who had died before her time. Nellie Mae's gifts to me were obviously her long life, but also her friendship, her love, her acceptance, and her zest for life. What a wonderful woman!!!! [DLL.] 
Pierce, Nellie Mae (I722)
 
1765        No state in the union can boast of a more heroic band of pioneers than Iowa. In their intelligence, capability and genius they have been far above the pioneers of the eastern states and in their daring and heroism have equaled the Missouri and California argonauts. Their privations, hardships and earnest labors have resulted in establishing one of the foremost commonwealths in America, the possibilites of which are as great as those possessed by any of her sister states. The material advancement of Iowa has been largely secured through the efforts of such men as Spencer Wiltsey, who came to Iowa forty-five years ago. The history of her frontier life is indeed familiar to him and no man has borne more of the hardships and trials than he.
       Mr. Wiltsey was born in Otsego County, New York , on the 9th of April 1834. Spencer Wiltsey, the third member of the family, pursued his education in the schools of the east. In 1857 he came to Iowa, living with his elder brother. He purchased land and has since remained in Hamilton county, being widely known as a reliable and representative citizen. He has held a number of offices, has been elected constable and in all positions of public trust has enjoyed the confidence and respect of all those who know of his career. He votes with the Republican Party.
       The history of Spencer Wiltsey, whose name introduces this record, is closely associated with the annals of Hamilton County. When he arrived in Iowa, in 1857, there were only two log houses where Webster City now stands, and a few indeed were the settlers within a radius of twenty miles. These little cabins had been built by Wilson Brewer and by Tolman Wiltsey. The settlers came to those houses, meeting with reference to the Indian massacres at Spirit Lake and may of the great men of the county offered their services to aid in protecting the settlers upon the frontier. Trading was done at Iowa City, a distance of one hundred and sixty miles, and an entire week was consumed in making the trip. the Wiltsey family have indeed been very prominent in promoting public progress and improvement here, as well as in reclaiming the wild land for the purpose of civilization. [SpW 01.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Spencer Wiltsey is a 47 year old, white, single male. He is a farmer by occupation. He was born in New York of parents who were born in New York (father) and Connecticut (mother). He lives with his brother, Tolman, a cousin, Delevan, his father, Isaac, another cousin, Eugene, and his son, Frank. Also living with the family is Ann Fritcher, a servant. They all live in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [TW 06.] 
Wiltsey, Spencer (I2575)
 
1766        Norma lived with Alvin in Cornell for 24 years, Menomonie for three years, and Elmwood for two years before her death. She was married to Alvin for 48 years. Her hobbies included taking care of her family, baking, and gardening. [NLH 01.]
       An obituary was printed in an undated, unknown newspaper in April 2000. It reads as follows:
       Norma Lou (Helland) Lange
       Norma Lou (Helland) Lange, age 65 of Elmwood, Wis., died Wednesday, April 5, 2000, in her home.
       Norma was born in Colburn township, Wisconsin, on June 25, 1934, the daughter of Henry and Beulah (Downer) Helland. She grew up in Anson township.
On March 29, 1952, she married Alvin Lange at the Trinity Lutheran Church in Cornell. They lived in Cornell for 24 years, Menomonie for three years, and Elmwood for the past two years.
Norma's hobbies included taking care of her family, baking and gardening.
       Preceding her in death were her parents and her brother, Melvin.
       Survivors include her husband of 48 years, Alvin of Elmwood; four children, Robert (Karen) Lange of Sun Prairie, Rodney (Joanne) Lange of Elmwood, Roger (Marie) of Friesland, and Ruth (Charles) Javener of Nes Auburn; four sisters, Mary (Alvin) Pahl of Cornell, Lila Pahl of Jim Falls, Sylvia (Robert) Fasbender of Cadou, and Gladys (George) Barnett of Jim Falls; three brothers, Vernon (Beverly) Helland of Cornell, Carrel (Myrna) Helland of Cadou, and Delbert (Donna) Helland of Cornell; a sister-in-law, Delores Helland of Cornell; 14 grandchildren, Justin, Jon, Holly, Larry, Leonard, Nathan, Angel, Melody, Dale, Joshua, Megan, Brandie, Jacquelyn, Matthew; numerous nieces and nephews; three aunts; other relatives and friends; and her dog Speckles "Specks."
       A memorial service was held at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 9, 2000 at Keehr Funeral Home in Spring Valley, Wis., with the Rev. Keith Holste officiating. Cremation was at Eau Claire Memorial Crematory in Eau Claire, Wis.
       Keehr Funeral Home, Spring Valley, handled arrangements [NLH 01.]. 
Helland, Norma Lou (I189)
 
1767        Novella Tennis is the wife of Alanson M. Curryer, Jr. She lives at 955 N. Virgil in Los Angeles, California with her husband and her father-in-law, Alanson M. Curryer, Sr. She is listed by the register as a housewife and also a registered democrat. [AMC 10.]
       In the 1938 California Index to Register of Voters, "Flossy" Novella Tennis, the wife of Alanson M. Curryer, Jr., lives with her husband and her father-in-law, Alanson M. Curryer, Sr., at 955 N. Virgil in Los Angeles, California. She is listed as a housewife. All three Curryers in this household are listed as registered democrats. [AMC 11.] 
Tennis, Novella (I2544)
 
1768        On September 12, 1918, John Edward Reyburn registered for the World War I Draft. He offered the following information on the registration:
Name: John Edward Reyburn
Address: RFD 1, Burdett, Washington County, Colo.
Age: 32
Date of Birth: September 14, 1885
Race: White
Citizenship: Native Born
Present Occupation: Farming
Place of Occupation: RFD 1, Burdett, Washington County, Colo.
Nearest Relative: Mrs. J.E. Reyburn, RFD 1, Burdett, Washington County, Colo.
Height: Medium
Build: Medium
Eye Color: Blue
Hair Color: Light
Disabilities: None [JER 03.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, John Edward Reyburn is a 35 year old white, married male. He is married to Hazel E. Pierce. He was born in Colorado of parents who were born in Missouri (father) and Indiana (mother). He reads, writes, and speaks English. He is occupied as a barber in a barbershop. He is classified as a worker. He rents his home. He lives with his wife, Hazel, and a daughter, Elleanore, at 526 Lincoln Street, Sterling, Logan County, Colorado. [JER 04.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, John E. Reyburn is a 44 year old, white, married male. He is married to Hazel E. Pierce and has been married to her since he was 31 years old. He owns his own home; the family lives on a farm; it also has a radio. John is a farmer, occupied with general farming. He is classified as an owner and was at work at the time of the census. He has not been a member of any U. S. military organization. He reads, writes, and speaks English, although the form doesn't confirm the latter. He lives with his wife, Hazel, and one daughter, Elleanore, in Rock Creek 7 Township, Washington County, Colorado. [JER 05.] 
Reyburn, John Edward (I711)
 
1769        On September 28, 1874, Karl and two brothers arrived in New York City on board the ship, Deutschland, from Bremen, Germany, origin Russia. They were without their parents and sisters. They arrived prior to the remainder of the family. There are questions that are raised about this situation.
What is the reasons for this early departure?
Why the family split up? Was it monetary?
When these three arrived, where did they go?
Who met them in New York?
Where did they go? Who gave them directions to the Dakotas? (Carl must have known something.)
There may be other questions as well.
       Some of these questions are answered in the pages of the autobiography or "history" that Karl has left behind that has been made accessible to me by Terry Wacker (Texas) from the University of North Dakota Library, but translated from the German by Hilda Feickert Sperle, a granddaughter, who was 15 years old at the time of the translation. I would urge the reader to examine these pages for the answers to the above questions. [KlW 03.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Karl Wacker is a 25 year old, white, married male. He was born in Russia of parents who were also born in Russia. All speak German. Karl is a farmer by profession. He lives with his wife, Barbara, and two children: Karl, Jr. and Amelia. The family lives in Hutchinson County, Township 98N and Range 57W, Dakota Territory, which is really South Dakota. [KlW 01.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Karl Wacker is a 45 year old, white, married male. He is married to Barbara Neuharth and has been married to her for 24 years. He was born in Russia of parents who were also both born in Russia. They all speak German. He immigrated to the United States in 1873 (1874) and has lived in the United States for 27 (26) years. He is a naturalized citizen. His occupation is that of farmer. He has not been unemployed in 1900. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He has mortgaged his farm. He lives with his wife, Barbara, and nine children: Karl, Jr., Barbara, Kate, Bertha, Henry, Christina Fred, Luisa, Imanuel. The family lives in Wachter Township, McPherson County, South Dakota. [KlW 02.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Karl Wacker is a 55 year old, white, married male. He is married to Barbara Neuharth and has been married to her for 39 years. He was born in Russia of parents who were also born in Russia. They all speak German. He immigrated to the United States in 1874. He is a naturalized citizen. It is not clear if he speaks English or if he reads and writes it. The census record indicates that he speaks German, and, indicates that he can read and write, but not what language. He is not in school. He owns his own farm free and clear. He has not been in the military, nor is he blind or deaf and dumb. He lives with his wife, Barbara, and four children: Fred, Louise, Emeal, and Marth. The family lives in Wacker Township, McPherson County, South Dakota. [KlW 04.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Karl Wacker is a 66 year old, white, married male. He is married to Barbara Neuharth Wacker. He owns his own home free and clear. He immigrated to the United States in 1874; he was naturalized in 1880. He reads, writes, and speaks English - thus, that issue is cleared up from the 1910 census. His native language is German. He was born in Russia of parents who were also born in Russia. All spoke German. He is a retired farmer. He lives with his wife, Barbara, in Wishek Village, McIntosh County, North Dakota. [KlW 06.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Karl Wacker is a 75 year old, white, married male. He is married to Barbara Neuharth Wacker. He was born in Russia of parents who were both born in Russia. All spoke German. Karl and Barbara own their own home; it is valued at $545; they live on a farm. Karl has not attended school since Sept. of 1929. He reads, writes, and speaks English. However, his native language is German. He immigrated to the United States in 1874 and is naturalized. He has no occupation and is retired. He also has not served in the United States military. He lives with his wife, Barbara, in Wacker Township, McPherson County, South Dakota. [KlW 07.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Karl Wacker is living with a granddaughter, Hilda Sperle and her husband, Gottlieb. Somehow his record was separated from theirs, but I was able to find and put the two together. In any case, Karl is a 85 year old, white, widowed, male. He has not attended school or college during 1929. He completed three grades of education. He was born in Russia. He lives on a farm in McPherson County, South Dakota. He is not working or seeking work because he is unable to work. In the 12 months ending in Dec. 31, 1939, he did receive income of $50 or more from sources other than money wages or salary. He lives with his granddaughter, Hilda, and her husband, Gottlieb, in Leola Township, McPherson County, South Dakota. [KlW 09.] 
Wacker, Karl (I2659)
 
1770        On the Internet, I have found the names of parents of Edward P. McKowen as that of Thomas McKowan, b. ca. 1793, New Brunswick, Canada, d. ca. 1848 in Wisconsin. Supposedly, Thomas married Lydia Robbins Parlee, b. ca. Sussex Vale, Kings county, New Brunswick, Canada, May 21, 1818. To this marriage, supposedly six children were born: John R., b. ca. 1818; Sarah, b. 1819; Edward P., b. ca. 1822;, William McKowen, b. ca. 1824; Joseph, b. ca. 1826; and, Ann, b. ca. 1834, all in New Brunswick, Canada. I have not attempted to verify this information. I have written to the individual [pmcmanus@ix.netcom.com] with no response. Thus, I cannot document the information and will not place it formally in this compilation.
       This information also indicates that Edward P. McKowan married a Jane C. Smith, 15 October 1846 in Milwaukee, WI, who was born in Ireland, ca. 1829. I will place this information with that of Edward P. McKowen, but it is undocumented. [EPM 14.]
       It is not clear of the spelling of Edward P. McKowan's last name. It could be McKowan, McCowan or McGowan. For example, in Lee, J.W. (1912). History of Hamilton County, Iowa. Chicago, S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, it is spelled, McCowan [EPM 01; p. 45]. In other places, it is spelled McKowan. I have chosen arbitrarily to use the last name spelling of McKowan.
       According to Lee [EPM 01; p. 45], Edward McKowan arrived in the Hamilton County area in 1855 with the Lakins. On page 47 of Lee, it states: "In the Spring of 1855, Luther Lakin left home [Illinois], intending to get married and meet his father and other settlers on the Skunk [river], but he arrived about two weeks earlier than the rest and can therefore lay just claim to being the first settler in the east part of the county and in Lyon township. About two weeks after his arrival Elisha Lakin, b. A. Lakin, and E. P. McCowan came and all settled near each other. The men turned in and helped Mr. McCowan to build a cabin, which was the first house built in that part of the county. McCowan moved into his new house and shortly afterwards Evaline McCowan was born, being the first white child born in the east half of the county." [EPM 02; p. 47.]
       On October 1, 1855, Edward McCowen deposited in the General Land Office of the United States a Certificate of the Register of the Land Office of the State of Iowa, Fort Des Moines. This certificate recognized a cash purchase of public lands in Iowa with the following description: "The North East quarter of the South East quarter of Section Twenty Three, and the North West quarter of the South West quarter of Section Twenty Four, in Township Eighty Seven North, of Range Twenty Four West, in the District of Lands subject to sale at Fort Des Moines Iowa, containing Eighty Acres."
       In the 1856 Iowa State Census, Edward McKowan is a 34 year old, married male, born in New Brunswick, Canada. His profession is that of carpenter; according to the census (if it can be read and interpreted correctly), Edward is a "native voter" and a member of the "military." He lives with his wife, Lucinda, Lucinda's son, Gustavus S. Kendall, her daughter, Helen Kendall, Edward's children by Jane Smith, George McKowan and Martha McKowan, and two children from Lucinda's marriage to Delatus Morgan, Frank and L.A. Morgan (the latter being a female), in Clear Lake Township, Webster County, Iowa. [EPW 17.]
       In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, E. P. McGowan is a 37 year old, male, farmer with a value of real estate at $1,000 and personal property at $1,000. He was born in Canada. With him are his wife, Emaline, George, Martha (the latter two from an unknown wife), and Franklin, Lucinda McKowan's son by her marriage to Delatus Morgan. Also living with him are his daughter Evaline [my great grandmother) from his marriage to Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan. Emeline is his daughter with Emaline Whitney. And, finally, there is Gustavus Kendall, the son of Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan. [EPM 04.] Shortly, he will be off to the Civil War.
       In the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Edward P. McKowan is a 47 year old male, a farmer. He has real estate valued at $3,000 and personal property valued at $600. He was born in New Brunswick, NS, Canada. Both his father and mother were foreign born. He is a male citizen of the United States. He is living with his wife, Emerline, daughters Evaline (mother Lucinda Lakin McKowan), Emerline, Josephine, Mary, and Anna, as well as sons Thomas and Joseph. [EPM 05.]
       In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Edward P. McKowan and family are living in the town of Fredonia, Louisa County, Iowa. He lives with his wife, Emaline, and six children - two daughters (Raiana and Mary) and four sons (Thomas, Joseph, Asa, and Lafayette). He is a 58 year old, white, married male. He was born in New Brunswick, Canada. He is a hotel keeper. [EPM 12.]
       In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Edward P. McKowan is a 62 year old male who was born in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Canada. Both his mother and father are foreign born. He is married and is living with his wife and five children (18-4 years of age). He lives in Cass Township (89), range 25, Section 30, SW NE, Hamilton County, Iowa. He is entitled to vote.
       Between 1885 and his death in 1892, E. P. McKowan lived in both Kansas City, Missouri, and, Muscatine, Iowa. In Kansas City, Missouri, he was accompanied by, but did not live with, sons Asa, Thomas, and Joseph. There were two other McKowans listed: William and Nathan. However, I do not know who they are. As for who may have accompanied him in Muscatine, Iowa, I do not know. [DLL.]
       In 1888, Edward P. McKowan lived at N. 446 Washington, Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas with his wife, Emaline, and sons, Joseph and Asa. Why they left Iowa is not known. However, there was a recession in the United States at the time. They could simply have been looking for work. [EPM 20; DLL.]
       In 1889, Edward P. McKowan is living at 2603 East 18th Street in Kansas city, Missouri, working as a carpenter. Living also in Kansas City, but at different addresses are his sons, Thomas, Asa, and Joseph. [EPM 19.]
       A notice of the death of E. P. McKowan was published in the Webster City Tribune on July 22, 1892. [EPM 07.]
       Charles Aldrich of the Historical Department of Iowa in Des Moines and the founder of The Freeman, a newspaper in Webster City, Iowa, wrote in the Webster City Journal on 29 July 1892 about E. P. McKowan:
       "I have been requested to send to my tribute to the memory of the late E. P. McKowan. He was one of the very early settlers in Hamilton county, having located at Lakin's Grove, on the east bank of the Skunk river, in the year 1854. He was residing there when I came to Webster City in the spring of 1857, and remained there a number of years afterward. His was one of the very early names to be entered upon the subscription list of the Hamilton Freeman; I am sure he received the first number. My recollection of him in those early days is very distinct and vivid. Indeed, for some years after I stared The Freeman, I think I knew every man in the county. At that time there was a stretch of wild, unbroken prairie eastward from McKowan's farm for at least 25 miles--without a house, not even the remains of a preemption shanty. He finally sold that farm and purchase of me the one adjoining that of Henry M. Barstow, on the north, where he resided for many years. He met with sundry reverses of fortune, and in 1886 removed to Wichita, Kansas. He returned to Iowa in 1890, settling at Muscatine, where he resided until his death, which occurred on the 21st instant. I hear that his remains were taken back to Webster city, most appropriately, for interment in the vicinity of his old home. Mr. McKowan was born in Canada on the 1st of August, 1822. He was therefore within a few days of 70 years of age. All who knew him during the years he lived in Hamilton county, will agree with me that we never had a purer, better citizen. He was a kind and affectionate father, an always abiding, reliable friend. In his everyday life he was an example of truth, manliness and integrity. Without other data than that supplied by memory, I am of the opinion that he was a member of one of the Christian churches from the time I first knew him. I am informed that he died in the confident belief of a better life to come--a humble, trusting Christian.
       Mr. McKowan had been three times married. His funeral was attended by his twelve children, who came from homes far apart, to pay their last tribute of respect and affection to the blessed memory of one of the best of fathers. In their irreparable bereavement they will have the since sympathy of all the early settlers of Hamilton county." [EPM 06.]
       A second obituary was published in the Webster City Freeman on July 27, 1892. It reads:
       "E. P. McKown, one of the early settlers of Hamilton county, died at his home in Muscatine, Iowa, on the 21st inst, in the 70th year of his age, from dropsy of the heart. Mr. McKowan came to Hamilton county and settled at Lakin's Grove in the spring of '55 (1855), thirty-seven years ago.
       In the spring of '67, he purchased a farm of Cha's. Aldrich, just northwest of this city, where he resided until six years ago, when he removed to Kansas and settled in Wichita. About two years ago he located in Muscatine, where he resided until his death. Twelve children - five boys and seven girls - and a wife are left to mourn his loss. The funeral took place in this city, Saturday, July 23rd, from the residence of his son-in-law, H. S. Lee, with Rev. J. T. Blanchard as the officiating clergyman.
       At the time Mr. McKowan came to this country it was a vast expanse of prairie, unbroken by hut or palace, and the hardy pioneer had to wrest his subsistence from the soil and endure privations known only to those who have experienced the hardships and vicissitudes of frontier life. But the men who marched in the vanguard of civilization were of the best brain and brawn in the land, and were fully equipped by nature to combat successfully with the conditions of a new country. Mr. McKowan was endowed with many traits of the ideal pioneer. Possessing an iron will, a strong constitution and a kind heart, he overcame obstacles and reared a family of children who are a credit to their ancestor. All were at his bedside a few days prior to his death." [EPM 08.]
       There is some question about the burial of E. P. McKowan. The obituaries and a piece in the Muscatine, Iowa Daily Journal point toward a funeral in Webster City, Iowa. However, no grave stone has been found. The assumption is that he was buried in Graceland Cemetery, Webster City, Iowa, but there is no proof. [See EPM 09 and 10.]
       A Newspaper article about the Edward P. McKowan family reunion of 1903 is also placed here. It is not possible to know where this reunion took place - the Evening Gazette of 6 July 1903 is not identified. It could be in Muscatine, Webster City, Cedar Rapids, or Elsworth, Iowa. The latter is probably not likely since it is a very small town; Cedar Rapids is the most likely since it is the home of Fred and Mary (McKowan) Morgan where the reunion took place. [DLL.]
       HAPPY RE-UNION OF LARGE FAMILY
       Meeting of Relatives After a Separation of Eleven Years-Interesting Program
       A family reunion is being held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Morgan, 1004 Second Avenue west. The relatives from abroad are Mrs. McKowan and daughter Leona, Joe and Lafe McKowan, Mrs. and Mrs. E. C. Brimmer and sons from St. Paul, Asa P. McKowan and wife from Sioux City, Thomas McKowan from Bentonville, Ark, Mrs. and Mrs. Darl Welch of Jewell Junction, Iowa, Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Stirien and daughters of Muscatine, Iowa. A program of interest to the family was rendered last evening, consisting of the following:
Instrumental Music, Abbie Webster.
Song, "Home, Sweet Home."
Prayer, F. A. Morgan.
Roll call, consisting of reminiscences of childhood days.
Instrumental duet, Mildred and Josephine Stirien.
"Lessons Learned Around the Old Hearthstone," Mrs. Stirien
Recitation, Ernest Brimmer.
Quartet, "All Through the Night," Ina, Jessie, Mildred and Josephine Stirien.
Tribute to the departed, Asa McKowan:
       "It was eleven years ago I think, since we met at our last family reunion, and we all had a splendid time then, but little did we surmise at that time that we would gather together again eleven years hence. But time brings forth many changes, and we are all here. Yes, all but three, and to those three our departed loved ones I am requested to pay a tribute. But what can I say to the members of our family? Nothing but what you all know, and yet I know it will give us all pleasure to dwell for a few moments upon the memory of a husband and father, a daughter and sister, and a brother."
       "I am sure that during the past eleven years of fathers absence and through the years to come, we can never forget the memory of his companionship. He did more for us than we can ever realize. His task through life was not an easy one, as we know, but his labor was not in vain. His life's example is a good one for us to copy. His devotion to his family was supreme with him and he toiled with the thought that God was his only judge and to Him alone should he yield the record of life's troubled days."
       "To me the essence of such a though is exemplary of life's highest attainments: for after all earth's transitory things decay. Its pomp, its pleasures pass away, but the sweet memory of the good survives the vicissitude."
       "When we glance back over the short life of our Sister Rhue we cannot help being impressed with her loving and sunny disposition. Reared in the love and faith of her Lord, she continued true to the end. But with her as with few others, she had her sorrows and many they were, and how bravely she carried her burdens. There is great satisfaction in knowing that it is the long suffering that gain the richest inheritance in heaven, and she is now enjoying her reward. Her life was a blessing to us all and it behooves us to remember and cherish her example of patience and endurance and make the most out of this life for
       "Our few revolving years
How swift they glide away;
How short the time of life appears
When past--but as a day."
       "And to our Brother George we have nought but loving words and thoughts. He was a true friend to us all, and friendship is a priceless jewel that should be forever cherished; therefore, let us revere his memory and ever be grateful for the life of our brother George."
       "And again to the memory of Father and Rhue, I want to say that through all the years we prized their relationships. They were strong and true hearted, loving and lovable. I don't think there was a note in their lives that didn't ring true. Their friendship was an inspiration and a blessing. the sincerity of their lives endeared us to them, and I think that to us all the memory of every day we passed in their companionship is as a flower fragrant and fadeless. How blessed and sweet are their memories to us. I am sure that kindness of heart, consideration for the weak and helpless; loyalty to those we love and a courage to carry out our true convictions are a part of our heritage from them in whose absence we meet; therefor as a fitting tribute we can truthfully say:
"Servants of God well done,
They glorious warfares past;
The battle's fought, the race is won,
And thou are crowned at last."
Solo, Leona McKowan
Tribute to the living, Thos. McKowan:
"       Dear mother, sister and brothers and friends: I am thankful that I have been permitted to answer present this evening, and it does my heart good to look into these faces. May this meeting impress itself upon us in such a way that it will educate us to be better men and better women.
"Just a word about mother: Mother, that name has so twined itself around our hearts that they must cease to throb ere we forget it. Our infant arms were first uplifted to it; we cling to it in manhood, we will worship it in old age. Alas! how little I appreciated mother's tenderness and how heedless I was in youth of all her anxieties.
       "But when far away, when the cares and coldness of the world came to my heart, when I experiences for myself how few to love me, how few that would defend me in misfortune, then it was I thought of mother and I know you all join with me in saying--God bless our mother, and may we never forget her advice and influence.
       "A few words about that dear old father, sister and brothers. He should not be forgotten. His kind acts and pleasant words should be treasured up as priceless gems upon which our minds should love to dwell in the fondest and most sacred recollections. He fought the stern, hard battles of life bravely and like a true husband and father he never surrendered to any obstacle in the way of his duty and care for his loved ones, and may we all endeavor to so live that when we have been "raised to power" that we may all meet in that city not made by hands. What a grand reunion that will be."
Recitation--Abbie Webster.
Song--In the Sweet By and Bye
       At the conclusion of this interesting program refreshments were served and the remainder of the evening passed in the happy intercourse natural to meetings of this kind. [EPM 15.]

       I, Dale L. Lange have searched for the burial place of my 2nd great grandfather, Edward P. McKowan for some time. The assumption was that he was buried in Graceland Cemetery, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. However, I think that I have established his burial place with his third wife, Emaline Whitney McKowan in Roselawn Cemetery, Roseville, Ramsey County, Minnesota: Section 1, Block X, Lot 252 W1/2, Space 4. The grave is unmarked. It is my assumption that the third wife of Joseph W. McKowan, Jane E. McKowan had a hand is making this arrangement. She seems to be the owner of the lots for the burial of Emaline, Edward P., Louis L., and Joseph W. McKowan in this cemetery. I can almost find nothing about her. [DLL.] 
McKowan, Edward P. (I577)
 
1771        Otto was in the U.S. Army in WWI. but was not overseas during that period. According to Joshua Lange, a great grandson, "Otto was a veteran of World War I, enlisting in the army in 1918(though the search continues for his registration card). Like his brother Walter, he also worked in the medical corps, only he led teams of horses for ambulatory purposes and he was also a foot-soldier. [JosL 01.]
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Otto was living in Wentworth township, South Dakota, with his parents and five siblings: Ella, Art, Paul, Walter, and Max. He is a white, six year old, single male, born in South Dakota in 1894 in January. His parents were both born in Germany of German parents. [RL 07.]
       In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Otto Lange is an 11 year old, white, single male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were both born in Germany. He lives with his parents, Emilie and Robert, one sister, Ella, and five brothers (Arthur, Paul, Walter, Max, and Armin [Armie]). They all live in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 12.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Otto G. Lange is a 16 year old, white, single male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were both born in Germany. He speaks, reads, and writes English and is still in school. He is employed (most likely by his father) as a laborer on the home farm. He lives with his parents, Robert and Emelie, and six siblings (Ella, Arthur, Paul, Walter, Max, and Armin) in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 09.]
       In 1917, Otto Lange registered for the draft in World War I. The following is the information that he provided:
REGISTRATION CARD
Full Name: Otto Lange
Address: Howard, Montana
Date of Birth: January 16, 1894
Citizen Status: Natural Born
Occupation: Farming
Employer: Jack Katen
Address: Howard, Montana
Dependents: Mother and Father
Marital Status: Single
Race: Caicasoam
Prior Military Service: None
Draft Exemption: None
REGISTRAR'S REPORT:
Height: Medium
Build: Medium
Color of Eyes: Gray
Color of Hair: Light
Bald: No [OGL 09.]
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Otto was in Jackson County, Cleveland Township on a farm that he owned. He is 25, white, male, and single. He can read, write, and speak English. He was born in South Dakota of parents that were both born in West Prussia, Germany and whose native language was German. He was employed and working on his own account. [OGL 07.] Otto does have a roomer on his farm, whose name is Nicolas Boullion.
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Otto Gustav Lange is a 36 year old, white, married male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were both born in Germany (actually West Prussia). He was first married when he was 32 years of age. Otto owns his home which is actually on a farm. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He is a farmer, working in General Farming. As a class of worker, he is working on his own account. Otto is veteran of WWI. He lives with his wife, Hazel A. Frank Lange and three children: two daughters: Dorothy and Della; and one son: Alvin. The family lives in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [OGL 11.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Otto G. Lange is a 46 year old, white, married male. He is married to Hazel A. Frank Lange. He has not attending school or college any time since March 1, 1940. His highest grade in school is grade 8. He was born in South Dakota and has lived in the same place since april 1, 1935. He rents his home on a farm for $4 a month. His occupation is that of a farmer; his class of worker is that he works on his own account. The number of hours worked during the week of March 24-30, 1940 was 40. He worked for 52 weeks during the year 1939; and he did receive income from other sources during that time. Otto lives with his wife Hazel and five children: Daughters Dorothy, Della and Betty, as well as sons Alvin and Harvey. The family lives in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [OGL 18.]
       In the Chippewa Herald, Chippewa, Wisconsin, an obituary for Otto G. Lange was published on October 09, 1979. It reads as follows:
       "Otto Lange, 85, Route 2, Cornell, Town of Cleveland, died at the Hetzel Care Center, Bloomer, Monday morning, October 8, 1979.
       He was born January 16, 1894, in South Dakota, the son of Robert and Amelia Lange. Soon after they moved to Fairchild, where he grew up.
       He served in the Army during World War I and married Hazel Frank February 9, 1926 in Winona, Minnesota. They then returned to the Fairchild area. In 1941, the moved to the Town of Cleveland and have lived there since.
He was a member of St. John's Lutheran Church, Cornell and the World War I Barracks of Chippewa County.
       Survivors include his wife; two sons, Alvin, Jim Falls and Harvey Cornell; three daughters Mrs. Wallace (Dorothy) Oemig, Cornell, Mrs. Gerald (Della) Nazer, Jim Falls and Mrs. Robert (Betty) Krause, Berlin; a brother Max, Granite Falls, MN; 21 grandchildren; and 15 great grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his parents, four brothers and a sister.
       A funeral service was held at 2 p.m. Thursday, October 11, at St. John's Lutheran Church with the Rev. Loren Fritz officiating. Interment was made in the Cornell Cemetery. [OGL 02.] 
Lange, Otto Gustav (I26)
 
1772        Paul W. Lange was a farmer, a police officer, and a soldier in WWI. According to a response to a letter of Dale L. Lange (February 13, 2003) from Shirley and Erwin Lange, Paul Lange served in the Lightning Division of the U.S. Infantry in WWI in the Argonne Forest. He "went over the top" three times, i.e., went out of their trenches and charged the enemy trenches three times. [PWL 04.]
In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Paul is a five year old, white, single male. He lives with his parents in Wentworth township, Lake County, South Dakota, where he was born in 1895, and with five siblings: Ella, Art, Otto, Walter, and Max. His parents were born in Germany of Germany parents. [RL 07.]
       In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Paul Lange is a 10 year old, white, single male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were both born in Germany. He lives with his parents, Robert and Emilie, one sister, Ella, and five brothers (Arthur, Otto, Walter, Max, and Armin [armie]). They all live in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 12.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Paul William Lange is a 15 year old, white, single male. He was born in South Dakota of parents who were born in Germany. he reads, write, and speaks English and is still in school. He lives with his parents, Robert and Emelie, and six siblings (Ella, Arthur, Otto, Walter, Max, and Armie) in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 09.]
       On his World War I Draft Registration Card, Paul W. Lange provided the following information:
REGISTRATION CARD
Name: Paul William Lange
Age: 22
Home Address: Fairchild, Wis.
Date of Birth: April 28, 1895
Citizenship: Natural
Where Born: Wentworth, S. Dakota, USA
Citizen of What Nation: United States
Present Occupation: Farm Laborer
Employer: Wm Schroeder
Where: Augusta, Wis
Dependents: Father & Mother
Marital Status: Single
Race: Caucasian
Military Service: None
REGISTRAR'S REPORT
Height: Tall
Build: Medium
Color of Eyes: Blue
Color of Hair: Dark
Bald: No [PWL 08.]
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Paul has obviously returned from WWI. He is living with his parents. He is male, white, 24 years old, and single. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He was born in South Dakota. His parents were both born in West Prussia and speak German as well as English. He is a farmer whose profession or trade is general farming. He is working for himself. Paul lives with his parents, Robert and Emelie, and a brother, Max, in Cleveland township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 04.]
       In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, Paul Lange is 34 years old, a white, married male, owns his own home, owns a radio, lives on a farm, was born in North Dakota (actually South Dakota), whose parents were born in Germany, who can read, write, and speak English. Paul is a farmer who does general farm work, and was at work at the time of the census. He is also a military veteran or the Great War, WW I. [PWL 06.]
       In the Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, of July 18, 1974, the following obituary for Paul W. Lange was published. It reads:
       "Paul Lange, 79, died Tuesday at the Mt. Washington Home, Eau Claire, where he had been a resident since July 6.
       Mr. Lange was Third Ward Alderman in Augusta for many years, was a former member of the Augusta police force and a former member of the Grace Lutheran Church board.
       He was born April 28, 1895 in South Dakota and as a small boy moved to the Fairchild area with his parents. Mr. Lange served with the armed forces in France during World War 1. He married Magdalene Herzke Sept. 24, 1922. They farmed near Fairchild before moving to Augusta in 1941.
Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Robert Williams, Menomonee Falls; one son, Erwin Lange, Eau Claire; two brothers, Otto Lange, Cornell, Max Lange Granite Falls, Minn; and seven grandchildren.
       Services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at Grace Lutheran Church, August with the Rev. Arleigh Lutz officiating. Burial will be in East Lawn Cemetery (Augusta) with full military rites.
Friends may call Friday afternoon and evening and until 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the Anderson Funeral Home and at the church from noon until services." [PWL 02.] 
Lange, Paul William (I27)
 
1773        Resident of the Month
       Otto S. Steele, Jr.
       Otto S. Steele, Jr. was born June 14, 1922 in the Methodist parsonage in New Concord, Ohio, where his father, Otto S. Steele, Sr. was the pastor. His mother was Rachel Steele.
       Otto spent his boyhood in several Ohio communities and then West Lafayette, Indiana where his father was the pastor. Otto graduated valedictorian from West Lafayette High School and then graduated Phi Beta Kappa from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana. While at DePauw he made his decision to become a minister and after graduation, he entered Boston University School of Theology, where his father had graduated from seminary years before.
       Otto was chosen one of the two Methodist student delegates from the U. S. A. to attend the World Student Christian Federation conference in Switzerland. There he met Mildred Romedahl from Iowa, the other of the two U.S. student delegates to the conference in Switzerland, and they became engaged several months later. Mildred had graduated from college and was a Wesley Foundation counselor at Iowa City. They were married September 4, 1947, and Otto's father performed the ceremony. Otto and Mildred made their home in the parsonage of St. Paul's Methodist Church in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where they lived until Otto received his doctorate in 1951.
       They moved to Iowa, where Otto spent 441/2 years in the full-time ministry. He was known for caring for the needs of his flock, his sermons, his part-time teaching at Drake Divinity School, his organizing abilities, and his social concerns. He was a tireless foe of gambling for some 40 years as an unpaid lobbyist. Otto received many awards for his work on social justice causes, particularly for his efforts against gambling in Iowa.
       He received an honorary doctorate from Morningside College in 1980. Otto retired in 1988.
       He is an avid fan of the Boston Red Sox.
       Otto and Mildred had four children, an infant who died soon after birth in 1949, Martha, born in 1950, John, born in 1957, and Timothy, born in 1958. After the children were in school, Mildred earned three graduate degrees and taught English at Des Moines Area Community College, Drake University, and Central College.) [OSS 01.]
       OBITUARY
       Rev. Otto Scott Steele, Jr.
       Pella, Iowa
       Otto Scott Steele, Jr., son of Dr. Otto Scott Steele, Sr., and Rachel Merrill Steele, was born on June 14, 1922, in New Concord, Ohio, and passed away in Pella, Iowa, on February 19, 2008, at the age of 85.
       Otto spent his boyhood in several Ohio communities where his father was a Methodist pastor. The family moved to West Lafayette, Indiana, in 1933. Otto graduated as valedictorian from West Lafayette High School in 1940. In 1944 he graduate Phi Beta Kappa from DePauw University, where he lettered in baseball and played violin in the university symphony. In 1951 he received a Doctor of Theology degree from Boston University School of Theology.
       Otto met Mildred Romedahl, of rural Madrid, Iowa, at the 1946 World Student Christian Federation Conference in Switzerland, where they served as the two U.S. delegates. They married September 4, 1947. Otto and Mildred had four children, a son who died in infancy, Martha (Marty) Steele Knepper, John Steele, and Timothy Steele.
       Otto entered the Methodist ministry and was ordained deacon in 1946 and elder in 1947. He spent 44 1/2 years in the ministry, servicing East Kingston, New Hampshire, and Lawrence, Massachusetts, as a student pastor and the following full-time Pastorates in Iowa: Stratford, Des Moines: Simpson, Des Moines: Windson, Adel, Wellman, Des Moines: Epworthl, Monroe, and Fayette. For eight years he taught part-time at the Drake University Divinity School. In 1986 he retired and settled in Pella, Iowa, where Mildred was teacher at Central College. They both became active members of the United Methodist church there.
       Dr. Otto Steele served the Iowa Conference of the United Methodist church in many ways. He was president of the conference Board of Education and Registrar of the Board of Ordained Ministry. He attended World Methodist Conferences in London and Denver. As a minister, he was known for caring for the needs of his congregations, his organizing abilities, his sermons, and his social concerns.
       Otto headed anti-gambling forces in Iowa for over 40 years. He wrote many letters to the editor, often published in the Des Moines Register, and he was an unpaid lobbyist at the Iowa Statehouse. IN 1963 and 1992 his tireless efforts as an anti-gambling activities were recognized by the Iowa United Methodist church and the Truth About Gambling Foundation. In 2004 he received the B. J. Clark Justice Award and in 2005 a Peace and Justice Award from the Iowa United Methodist Church social action groups.
       Otto was an avid baseball fan. A former pitcher in church softball leagues in his younger days, he later coached Little League baseball teams. He was a devoted fan of the Boston Red Sox. He enjoyed classical music and politics.
       In early 2005 Otto was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia, a degenerative illness. In 2006 Otto and Mildred Moved in Vriendschap Village assisted living facility in Pella. In late 22006 Otto moved to the Long Term Care Unit of Pell Regional Medical Center.
       Otto was preceded in death buy his parents, Otto and Rachel Steele, and his sister-in-law, Josephine Said. Surviving are his wife, Mildred; their children and spouses, Marty Steele Knepper of Sioux City, Iowa, and her husband, John Knepper; John Steele of Omaha Nebraska, and his wife, Deb; and Timothy Steele of Milton, Massachusetts, and his wife, Elizabeth Menne; and his sister Esther Hyde, of Indianapolis, Indiana, and her family. There are four grandchildren: Laura Steele and Sarah Steele, children of John and Deb; and Katherine Steele and Andrew Steele, children of Timothy and Elizabeth.
       A visitation, with family present, will be held at the Garden Chapel Funeral Home in Pella on Saturday, February 23, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. A memorial service followed by a light lunch will be held at the Pella United Methodist church, 1414 University Street at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday April 5. At a later date, the cremated remains will be interred in the family plot in Rose Hill Cemetery, east of Luther, Iowa.
       The family requests that memorials in remembrance of Otto Steele be sent to the United Methodist Church of Pella, 1414 University Street, Pella, Iowa 50219. [OSS 02.]
 
Steele, Reverend Otto S. , Jr. Th.D. (I1707)
 
1774 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I15)
 
1775        See Lloyd Lakin, no. 483-16-3154 Social Security Death Index. Social Security Administration. Provo, Utah: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2006. [LoyL 01.] An original birthdate was 1914, based on census records. The Social Security Death Index clarifies the birth date. [DLL.] Lakin, Lloyd (I2256)
 
1776        She probably died in childhood. One source, indicates that she died in 1646 (Danny Charles Pierce, dcp@psnw.com), but I have not had contact with him since 1997. In any case, it appears that no record can be found of her death. [DLL.] Pierce, Persis (I1980)
 
1777        Shortly after their marriage, Frank and Mabel bought property owned by William H. and Elida Bates Pierce, Frank's father and mother. That property is described as follows [FOP 03]:
"East one half, South East Quarter Section #9, and the West one
half of the South West Quarter of Section Ten (10) all in Township
number Eighty-Eight (88) Range number Twenty Five (25) West of the
5th(?) Principle Meridian Iowa containing 160 acres."
       In 1901, February 28 to be exact, after making a decision to move to Breckenridge, Minnesota, this same property was sold to Benjamin F. Frantz. [FOP 04.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Frank Pierce is an eight year old, white, single male. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Vermont (father) and Wisconsin (mother). He lives in Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa with his parents, William and Elida, three brothers (Frederick, Charles, Ernest), Maggie Kohler, and John Bussy (farm laborer). [WHP 08.]
       In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Frank Pierce is an 11 year old, white, single male. He was born in Hamilton County, Iowa of parents who were born in the United States. He lives with his parents William and Elida, a step brother, Fred, three brothers (Charles, William, Bert), and an unknown female, Jennie Yaus. This family lives in Independence Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [WHP 05.]
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Frank O. Pierce is head of household in Independence Township, Hamilton County, Iowa, near Webster City, Iowa. He is a white, 26 year old married male, born in August of 1873. He is married to Mabel. He was born in Iowa; his father was born in Vermont; his mother was born in Wisconsin. Mabel and Frank, married for four years, have two children at the time: Gladys and Ralph. Edward W. Brewer, the brother of Madel, is living with Frank and Mabel as a farm laborer. Elsie Welch, a stepsister of Mabel is also living with Frank and Mabel. She is a teacher. Frank is a farmer who owns his own farm through a mortgage. He reads, writes, and speaks English. [FOP 10.]
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, Frank O. Pierce is 31 year old, white, married male. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Vermont (father) and Wisconsin (mother). His regular occupation is that of farmer. He has been a resident of Minnesota and Connolly Township (and this farm) for four years and three months. His wife is Mabel Claire Pierce. With Frank and his wife are four children: Gladys, Ralph Roy, Glen E., and Leta (Fern?). [FOP 13.]
       In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Frank O. Pierce is head of household in Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota, near Breckenridge, Minnesota. He owns his farm by mortgage. He is a 36 year old, white, married male. His wife is Mabel. Frank and Mabel have been married for 14 years. Five children are living with them: Gladys, Ralph, Glen, Leta, and Mildred. Frank was born in Iowa of parents of whom the father was born in Vermont, the mother in Wisconsin. His profession is that of a farmer who does general farming; he is an employer. He speaks, reads, and writes English. [FOP 09.]
       In 1918, Frank O. Pierce registered with the Draft Board. The information gathered from the Draft Registration Card is as follows:
Name: Frank Orlando Pierce
Residence: Breckenridge, Wilkin County, Minnesota
Age: 45
Date of Birth: 29 Aug 1873
Race: White
U. S. Citizen: Yes
Present Occupation: Farmer
Employer: Himself
Place of Employment: At Home
Nearest Relative: Mable Pierce
Address: Breckenridge, Minn.
Signature: FO Pierce
Registrar's Report
Height: Medium
Build: Medium
Color of Eyes: Blue
Color of Hair: Grey
Date: 12 Sept. 1918 [FOP 15.]
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Frank O. Pierce is head of household in Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota, near Breckenridge, Minnesota. He owns his farm through a mortgage. He is male, white, married to Mabel, and 46 years old. The children present at the time are: Gladys, Ralph, Leta, Mildred, Lois, and Merle. Glen is absent, and Kenneth died in infancy. Frank reads, writes, and speaks English. He was born in Iowa; his father was born in Vermont, his mother in Wisconsin. He is a farmer who does general farming; and, he is an employer. [FOP 08.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Frank(lin) O. Pierce is a 55 year old, white, married male. He has been married to Mabel C. Brewer since he was 22 years old. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Vermont (father) and Wisconsin (mother). He reads, writes, and speaks English. He owns his own home, lives on a farm, and owns a radio. He is occupied as a farmer working in the area of general farming. He was working at the time of the census. He has not been an member of any U. S. Military organization. He lives with his wife, Mabel, a daughter, Lois, a son, Merle, and two farm laborers, Mike Stomberg and Joe Trostie, in Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota. [FOP 12.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Frank O. Pierce is a 66 year old, white, married male. He is married to Mabel C. Brewer Pierce. He was born in Iowa. He has lived in the same place, that is Minnesota and Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota since 1935. He owns the farm he lives on. The value of the house in which he and Mabel live in is worth $6,000. He has not attended and school during 1940. He did attend school through the 7th grade. He was at work during 1940 for his own profit. During the week of March 24-30, 1940, he worked 84 hours. He is a farmer, working on a farm. He worked 42 weeks in 1939. He did not earn income of $50 or more from sources other than money from wages or salary. He lives with his wife, Mabel in Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota. Working on the farm are three helpers: Elmer Berndt; Calmer Willemssen, and Frank Harvego. Marian Heifner serves the family. [FOP 16.]
       PNEUMONIA CLAIMS BRO. AND SISTER 3 MINUTES APART: Lois Josephine and Merle Frank, children of Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Pierce, Victims of Disease: Services Held Sunday From Baptist Church: Burial at Webster City, Iowa, Tuesday - Four in Family Die of Same Disease. [The part of the article that concerns Lois is reproduced here; that for Merle appears under Merle; for the whole family appears under Frank O. Pierce.]
       The entire community was shocked last Friday when the news flew from mouth to mouth, telling of the death of the son and daughter of Fr. and Mrs. F. O. Pierce who reside on a farm a short distance north of this city. The dreaded disease, pneumonia took from our midst two of our best loved young folks, Lois Josephine, twenty-one years old and Merle Frank, nineteen years old.
The brother and sister had been ill only a few days when upon the advice of their physician they were removed to the Wahpeton hospital.        Everything possible was done for them in the way of medical science, but to no avail. Death came to the young folks shortly after 3:00 a.m., January 23. They died within three minutes of one another.
       Pneumonia has brought many heartaches to Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Pierce, having lost four of their children from the disease. Seventeen years ago, Kenneth, twin brother of Merle passed away and six years ago, Leta also died of the disease.
Lois Josephine...
Merle Frank...
       They leave to mourn their passing, beside their parents, two brothers, Ralph and Glenn, both of Breckenridge and two sisters, Mrs. Karl Erdmann of Breckenridge and Miss Mildred who teaches near Chicago.
       The saddest funeral service held in years took place Sunday at 12;30 o'clock in the first Baptist Church. The fine esteem in which the departed were held was proven by the large crowd attending the service. The church with its auditorium and basement both filled to capacity were unable to take care of all who wished to pay their respects to so fine a couple.
       As the long line of friends passed the twin caskets and gazed for the last time upon the faces that lay stilled by death, their actions showed their sorrow.
       Reverend N. Nelson gave a service that will remain in the hearts of those present for years to come. He found himself with one of the hardest services he had ever been called upon to officiate at. In his usual kindly manner he gave one of the most beautiful services ever given at a funeral service.
       Edward Nelson say two beautiful hymns, "Oh Dry Those Tears," and "I Come to the Garden Alone." Miss Jessie Siewerdsen was his accompanist.
       The pallbearers were all friends of long standing. The following acted as pallbearers for Lois Josephine from the church to the depot: Alice Kerch, Mrs. John Bakken of Wahpeton; Edith Amundson of Kent; Helen Connelley, Helen Nordick and Dorothy Stumpf of Wahpeton.
       Harold Siewerdsen, Prentice Rice, Robert Wentworth, Dean Johnson, Chas. Bert and Wallace Eiter were the pallbearers for Merle Frank Pierce.
       The executive board of the Breckenridge Community Commercial club attended the service in a body. Mr. F. O. Pierce is a member of the board.
       The twin caskets were placed upon Great Northern train Number 4 to start their journey to Webster City, Iowa, their final resting place. The depot platform was crowded with friends who came to offer their sympathy to the bereaved parents as they started their heart-breaking trip. As the train faded from view on its journey to Webster City, many handkerchiefs came into view. All had tried to cheer the parents in the hope of making their journey easier, but now that they had left, the crowd of friends started for their home with heavy hearts.
       Monday morning two cars left early for Webster City, Iowa to attend the Baptist church of that city. They laid Lois and Merle beside their sister and brother who had preceded them in death.
       The Gazette-Telegram joins with the entire community in extending our sympathy to the members of the F. O. Pierce household. [LP 02.]
OBITUARIES for Frank O. Pierce were recorded in an unknown, but probably a Breckenridge, Minnesota newspaper and the Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa, on 5 Oct 1951.
       F. O. PIERCE PASSES AWAY: Services from Baptist church, Interment at Webster City, Iowa
       F. O. Pierce passed away Thursday, October 4. at St. Francis hospital, where he had been a patient for the past few weeks.
       Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Baptist Church with Rev. Ray Allen officiating. Interment was as Webster City, Iowa. Graveside services were held Monday, October 8 at the Graceland cemetery with Rev. Jonathan Nielsen of the Baptist church officiating. Mr. Pierce had been baptized in the Baptist faith when a young man at Webster City and had been a member of the Breckenridge Baptist church since 1901.
       Frank Orlando Pierce, the son of William and Elida Pierce, was born August 29, 1873 at Webster City, Iowa, where he grew to manhood. In 1896 he was united in marriage to Mabel Brewer of Webster City, their home there for about five years. Then they moved to a form home in Connoly township near Breckenridge which was their home until their retirement in 1940. Since then they have made their home in McAllen, Texas for the winter months and at their lake cottage on Ottertail lake for the summer.
       During Mr. Pierce's years on the farm he was very active in all progressive farming. He was president of the Livestock Shipping Association of Breckenridge, held Township offices, was a member of the School Board for several years, and served as president of the Farm Bureau. He was also director of the Wilkin County Farm Loan Association.
       Besides his wife he is survived by two sons, Ralph of Frazee and Glen of Twenty-nine Palms, California and by two daughters, Mrs. Karl Erdmann (Gladys) of Breckenridge and Mrs. Max Lang [sic] (Mildred) of Granite Fall. Three brothers, Bert Pierce of Webster City, Iowa; Guy of Mulliken, Michigan and Ernest of Los Angeles and 12 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren also survive.
       He was preceded in death by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Pierce, twin sons Kenneth in infancy and Merle when a young man, Lois at 21 and Letha [sic] age 23. [FOP 06.]
FROM the Daily Freeman Journal, 5 Oct 1951:
       Rites Here for F.O. Pierce, 78
       Frank O. Pierce, 78, former Webster City resident, died Thursday morning at the hospital in Breckenridge, Minn., following a five-week illness.
       Graveside services will be held here Monday at 1. p.m. at Graceland cemetery with the Rev. Jonathan Nielsen officiating. Foster's funeral Home will have charge of services. The body will lie in state at the funeral home from Sunday evening until Monday noon.
       Frank O. Pierce, son of William and Elida Pierce, was born August 28, 1873, on a farm near Webster City. He was reared and educated in this community.
       Mr. Pierce was united in marriage Jan. 1, 1896 to Miss Mable [sic] brewer. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce farmed near Webster City until the spring of 1901 when moved to Breckenridge, their home since. The couple celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Jan. 1 1951, at their home.
       He is survived by his wife, two sons and two daughters: Ralph of Freesia [sic], Minn., Glen of Twenty-nine Palms, Minn. (CA), Mrs. Carl [sic] Erdman [sic] of Breckenridge and Mrs. Max (Mildred) Lang [sic] of Granite Falls, Min.. Also surviving are 12 grandchildren; three brothers, Ernest of Ocean Park, Calif.; Guy of Mulliken, Mich, and Bert E. Pierce of Webster city; and several nieces and nephews including Floyd Pierce of Webster City.
       Mr. Pierce was preceded in death by two sons and two daughters, by his parents and two brothers.
       He was baptized in the Baptist faith and was a member of the Webster City church until he moved to Breckenridge when he transferred his membership there. [FOP 06.]
 
Pierce, Frank Orlando (I5)
 
1778        SOME HIGHLIGHTS OF MY LIFE FOR MY CHILDREN - Written by Gladys R. Pierce (Erdmann) with minor editing by Dale L. Lange and and an addition by Elaine Erdmann, oldest daughter [GRP 02.]
       I was born at Webster City, Iowa on October 20, 1896 at a farm home near Webster City, Iowa. [I] lived there until in the early 1900s when we moved to a farm two miles north and two miles east of Breckenridge, Minnesota in Connelly Township.
       I attended rural schools in District #48 until I entered Breckenridge High School in 1913. I graduated in 1916. During my senior year, I took a course in practice teaching and when I graduated I was permitted to teach in rural schools. My practice teaching was at the Connelly School on Highway #75, just a few miles north of Breckenridge.
       I began regular teaching at District #48 in the fall of 1916. At that time, the school house was located about two miles north of Breckenridge. It was a little brown school. In fact, when I attended grade school, that same building was about a mile straight south of our farm on Highway 215. We often walked in good weather, but in the winter, the neighbors took turns hauling the pupils to school in sleds and if real cold we had heavy robes to keep us warm as we sat on straw in the sleds. Later, that building was moved to the location mentioned above. I often walked from our home to that school, but during real cold weather, my father would take me and help build the fire that had to be built every morning if it didn't hold over and that was quite often. Sometimes, it was so cold that the children had to sit on benches close to the stove. We all had to carry our noon lunch in dinner pails. Later on, a new building was built on the southeast corner of my parent's farm and I also taught there.
       In the fall of 1917, I joined the Student Nurses Training Program for the Army. Then, we were supposed to be sent over seas. I was sent to Camp Green at Charlotte, North Carolina. It was quite an experience for me as we had all black patients who came down with the flu at that time. So many died of the disease. We never knew if the patients we cared for one day would be there the next morning. While there, the Armistice was signed, but I still hope I might get to go over seas. I had a cousin, Floyd Pierce, who was over there and had been severely injured. He said he looked for me, but hoped I wouldn't have to come over seas. Not many months more, I was called home on account of the illness of all my family having the flu. After that I could have gone to Des Moines to Camp Grant, but decided to stay home and teach. It took some time to get my release so my record shows that I served from September 16,1917 to February 1919, but that is not correct.
       I did receive the Sixty Dollar Bonus from the State of Minnesota though. My name is on record in the World War I Book, edited in Wilkin County. I have one copy of that book.
       When I arrived home, I began teaching in the new school house just about one fourth mile east of our home. I taught there until I decided to run for County Superintendent of Schools in 1922, but was defeated. I was ahead in the primaries, but [was] defeated in the fall election. As I had no school, I applied for a position at a rural school near Glendive, Montana, a few miles from Linday, Montana. [I] was met at the depot at Glendive, and then had to ride in a horse drawn buggy to my destination where I was to live until spring.
       I drove a horse and buggy to school and the younger daughter, Katherine, of the Wise family where I boarded rode with me. This school was an old sod house. We had to build fires every morning in an old stove using lignite coal.
       I was a homesick girl, but had to stay until spring. [I] had many experiences during that year. When I boarded the train in May for Breckenridge, Minn., it was a happy day for me.
       When I arrived home I decided to attend Moorhead Teachers College at Moorhead, Minnesota for a year so that I could teach in city schools.
While at college, I was vice president of the YWCA, belonged to the Women's Athletic League, the Camp Fire Girls, and was president of the Country Life Club. Also, [I] was initiated into the Lamde Phi Sigma Educational Fraternity for both boys and girls, who attained a certain average in their marks.
       I graduated in 1924 and from 1924 to 1925, I taught at the Park School in Moorhead in the fourth grade. While there, I had students from Moorhead Teachers College doing practice teaching in my grade. The next year, I was offered the position at Mayville Teachers College teaching in the fourth grade as supervisor of student teachers. I had to do demonstration teaching at the college classes for students who were preparing for teaching and also had college classes come to my fourth grade room to observe certain classes. Also, several students had to come to my room to do practice teaching.
       Because of this position, I had to attend one summer session at the University of Minnesota and one at the University of Iowa.
       I taught at Mayville, North Dakota, until 1929 when on July 31, 1929, I was married to Karl William Erdmann.
       We lived on Island Park until we bought a home on 10 Street North in Breckenridge. We lived in that home until Karl retired from being Clerk of Court. He was elected in 1944 and retired June 1, 1962. So, [he] was Clerk of Court for 18 years.
       After Karl retired, we sold our home on 10th Street in Breckenridge and bought the lake home of our parents from the share of my sister, as we owned it together after my parents died. We spent our summer there and winters in McAllen Texas, until Karl became very ill and died, November 9, 1967. He was buried at Fort Snelling Cemetery in St. Paul, Minnesota on November 13, 1967. [Fort Snelling is in Hennepin County, south of Minneapolis, near the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. DLL]
       I lived at the lake home in the summer time and went to McAllen, Texas, to our model home. My children took turns driving my car down and going home by plane and vice-versa until 1972 when I decided to quit going away for the winter, so [I] sold my mobile home. I have home and sold the lake home in August of 1972 to an attorney in Wahpeton by the name of Bailey. I rented an apartment on 14th Street North in Breckenridge and moved there and have been there ever since until....
       [Elaine Erdmann: In 1980, Mom moved to the Bergee Apartments in Halstad to be near family. In the summer of 1986, she moved to the Sunrise Apartments, and [at] the end of September, she entered the Halstad Nursing Home where she resided until December 19, 1986, when she passed away. Burial was at Fort Snelling Cemetery, December 23, 1986. [She is buried with Karl W. Erdmann in Section O, Grave 01876.]
Other documents with information are found in Brewer-Bonebright, Sarah, and Harriet Bonebright-Closz. (1923). REMINISCENCES OF NEWCASTLE, IOWA 1848: A HISTORY OF THE FOUNDING OF WEBSTER CITY, IOWA, will not be included here, but can be found in the Pierce Family Documents notebooks. Those items are "Information Pertaining to the Book, Founding of Newcastle, GRP 03; "Notes Taken from Brewer History," GRP 04; and, "Some History of the Frank Orlando Pierce Family," GRP 05. [GRP 05 is especially useful as a guide to the William H. and F. O. Pierce families; information in GRP 03 and GRP 04 repeats information in the Brewer-Bonebright and Bonebright-Closz book. However, it is available in the Pierce Family Documents notebooks under Gladys Ruvera Pierce.]
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Gladys, the daughter of Frank O. and Mabel Pierce, is a three year old, white female, living in Iowa with her parents. Her birth month is October of 1896. She is obviously single. She was born in Iowa and her parents as well. She is too young to have control over many aspects of the English language. [FOP 10.]
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, Gladys is an eight year old, white, single female. She was born in Iowa of parents who were both born in Iowa as well. She has lived in Connelly Township, Wilkin County, Minnesota, for four years and three months. She lives with her parents, Frank and Mabel Pierce, and two brothers, Ralph Roy and Glen E., and one sister, Leta (Fern?). She has no designated occupation. [FOP 13.]
       In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Gladys, the daughter of Frank O. and Mabel Pierce, is a 13 year old, white, single female, who is going to school, and, who reads, writes, and speaks English. She was born in Iowa of parents who were born there as well. She is living in Minnesota. She has four other siblings: Ralph, Glen, Leta, and Mildred. [FOP 09.]
       In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Gladys, the daughter of Frank O. and Mabel Pierce, is a 23 year old, white, single female, who reads, writes, and speaks English. She was born in Iowa, as were her parents, but she is living in Minnesota. She is a public school teacher who works on her own account. [FOP 08.]
       In the 1930 United States Federal Census, Karl W. Erdmann was married to Gladys (Pierce). They were living in a rented home, the rent for which was $25 per month. They owned a radio. Karl was 40 years of age; Gladys was 34. They married when Karl was 39 and Gladys 33 years of age. Both were able to read, write, and speak English. Karl was born in Minnesota; his father was born in Germany; his mother in Wisconsin. Gladys parents were both born in Iowa. Karl was employed [I could not read the job title, nor the place of employment]. Gladys was not employed. On the day of the census, Karl was at work. Karl was a veteran of World War I. [KWE 07.]
       In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Gladys R. Pierce Erdmann is a 43 year old, white, married female. She is married to Karl W. Erdmann. She was born in Iowa, but lives in Minnesota and has lived in the same house for the past five years. She has not attended school or college at any time since 1 March 1940, but she has completed three years of college. She does not have employment outside the home for she is a homemaker. She lives with her husband,Karl, and four children (Elaine, Kenneth, Charlotte, Karl) at 220 10th Street in Breckenridge, Wilkin County, Minnesota. [KWE 12.]

On 22 Jan 2018, Elaine Erdmann Kolle wrote me [Dale L. Lange] an email message identifying a picture of Gladys R. Pierce in a nurses uniform that I have placed in Gladys' compilation. I place that email message here:

Dear Dale; Yes, that is my mother. She was in the Army Nurses training program in 1917 at Camp Green North Carolina She was scheduled to go overseas when the Armistice was signed. At this time she was called home because of illness in the family so she never went over seas. After this she could have gone to Des Moines - Camp Grant but decided to stay home and teach school. She went to Montana to teach
in a country school. Upon coming back home, entered Moorhead College to take college classes so would be able to teach ina high school. A big experience for a young girl at that time.

With Christ's Blessings, Elaine


 
Pierce, Gladys Ruvera (I264)
 
1779        The 1895 Minnesota State Census is very difficulty to read. Emma Preiss is an eight year old, white female born in Minnesota. Her parents are John Preiss and Christina Eggers Preiss both born in Minnesota. Emma lives with her parents and six siblings: Lizzie, Clara, John, Lena, Fredrich, William. Also with the family is Margaret Eichmuelin Preiss, the mother of John. The family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 02.]
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, which is difficult to read, Emma Preis is an 18 year old, white, single female. She was born in Minnesota of parents who were both born in Minnesota. She lives with her parents, John and Christina, and six siblings: John, Lena, Fred, Willie, Maggie, Walter. The family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota, RFD3. [JPr 06.]  
Preiss, Emma (I2623)
 
1780        The 1895 Minnesota State Census is very difficulty to read. Fredrick Preiss is a three year old, white male born in Minnesota. His parents are John Preiss and Christina Eggers Preiss both born in Minnesota. Fredrick lives with his parents and six siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Emma, Lena, John, William. Also with the family is Margaret Eichmuelin Preiss, the mother of John. The family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 02.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Fredrick Preiss is an eight year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were also born in Minnesota. He is at school and has attended school for 5 months this year. he reads, writes, and speaks English. He lives with his parents, John and Christina, and seven siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Johnny, Lena, Willie, Maggie, Walter. His Grandmother, Margaret, and a farm laborer, Christ Kritcian, also lives in the household. The entire family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 05.]
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, which is difficult to read, Fredrick Preiss is a 13 year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were also both born in Minnesota. He lives with his parents, John and Christina, and six siblings: Emma, John, Lena, Willie, Maggie, Walter. They live on a farm in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota, RFD3. [JPr 06.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Fredrick H. Preiss is a 17 year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were also both born in Minnesota. He has no occupation. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He lives with his parents, John and Christina, and four siblings: John Maggie, William, Walter. The family lives on a farm in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 07.]  
Preiss, Fredrick H. (I2626)
 
1781        The 1895 Minnesota State Census is very difficulty to read. John Preiss is a six year old, white male born in Minnesota. His parents are John Preiss and Christina Eggers Preiss both born in Minnesota. John lives with his parents and six siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Emma, Lena, Fredrich, William. Also with the family is Margaret Eichmuelin Preiss, the mother of John. The family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 02.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, John Preiss is a 12 year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were both born in Minnesota. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He lives with his parents, Christina and John, and seven siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Lena, Freddie, Willie, Maggie, Walter. His Grandmother, Margaret, and a farm laborer, Christ Kritcian, also live in the household. The entire family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 05.]
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, which is difficult to read, John Preiss is a 16 year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were both born in Minnesota. He lives with his parents, John and Christina, and six siblings: Emma, Lena, Fred, Willie, Maggie, Walter. The family lives on a farm in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota, RFD3. [JPr 06.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, John L. Preiss is a 21 year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents that were also both born in Minnesota. He speaks, reads, and writes English. He considers himself a farm laborer on the home farm. He is an employee who was employed on April 15, 1910. He lives with his parents, Christina and John, and with four siblings: Fred, Maggie, William, Walter. The family lives on a farm in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 07.]
REGISTRATION CARD
Name: John Preiss
Home Address: Chaska, Minnesota
Birth: July 22, 1888
Birthplace: Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota
Current Trade: Cement Contractor
Who is dependent on you>: Wife and two children
Married or Single: Married
Race: Caucasian
Military experience: None
Do you claim exemption: Yes
REGISTRAR'S REPORT
Height: tall
Slender, medium or stout: stout
Color of eyes: Blue
Color of hair: light
Bald: no
Disabled: no [JPrjr 03.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, John L. Preiss (Jr.) is a 31 year old, white, married male. He is married to Minnie M. Schulz. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were both born in Minnesota. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He owns his own home free and clear. He works as a laborer in a sugar company. He is classified as a worker. He lives with his wife, Minnie, and two children: Mildred and Earl. The family lives in the town of Chaska, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPrjr 01.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, John L. Preiss is a 41 year old, white, married male. He is married to Minnie Schulz. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were also born in Minnesota. he reads, writes, and speaks English. He owns his own home. And, his family lives on a farm. He has not been in school or college since Sept. 1, 1929. His occupation is that of general farming on his own farm. He is an employer; he is at work on his own farm. He is not a veteran of any war. He lives with his wife, Minnie, and five children: Mildred, Earl, Jannette, Wendell, John. The family lives in San Francisco Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPrjr 02.] 
Preiss, John L. (I2624)
 
1782        The 1895 Minnesota State Census is very difficulty to read. Lena Preiss is a five year old, white female born in Minnesota. Her parents are John Preiss and Christina Eggers Preiss both born in Minnesota. Lena lives with her parents and six siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Emma, John, Fredrich, William. Also with the family is Margaret Eichmuelin Preiss, the mother of John. The family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 02.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Lena Preiss is a 10 year old, white, single female. She was born in Minnesota of parents who were also born in Minnesota. She is at school and has attended school for 5 months this year. She reads, writes, and speaks English. She lives with her parents, John and Christina, and seven siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Johny, Freddie, Willie, Maggie, Walter. Her Grandmother, Margaret, and a farm laborer, Christ Kritcian, also live in the household. The entire family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 05.]
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, Lena Preiss is a 15 year old, white, single female. She was born in Minnesota of parents who were both born in Minnesota. She lives with her parents, John and Christina, and six siblings: Emma, John, Fred, Willie, Maggie, Willie. The family lives on a farm in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 06.]  
Preiss, Lena (I2625)
 
1783        The 1895 Minnesota State Census is very difficulty to read. William Preiss is a one month old, white male born in Minnesota. His parents are John Preiss and Christina Eggers Preiss both born in Minnesota. William lives with his parents and six siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Emma, Lena, John, Fredrick. Also with the family is Margaret Eichmuelin Preiss, the mother of John. The family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 02.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, William Preiss is a five year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who also were born in Minnesota. He lives with his parents, John and Christina, and seven siblings: Lizzie, Clara, Johnny, Lena, Freddie, Maggie, Walter. His Grandmother, Margaret, and a farm laborer, Christ Kritcian, also live in the household. The entire family lives in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 05.]
       In the 1905 Minnesota State Census, which is difficult to read, William Preiss is an 11 year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were also both born in Minnesota. He lives with his parents, John and Christina, and six siblings: Emma, John, Lena, Fred, Maggie, Walter. The family lives on a farm in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota, RFD3. [JPr 06.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, William Preiss is a 14 year old, white, single male. He was born in Minnesota of parents who were also both born in Minnesota. He speaks, reads, and writes English. He has no occupation. He lives with his parents, John and Christina, and four siblings: John, Fred, Maggie, Walter. The family lives on a farm in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. [JPr 07.]  
Preiss, William (I2627)
 
1784        The birth place of Christian Wacker is given in the Johnson Family Tree on Ancestry.com as Alt Freudental, Odessa, Russia. It has not been possible to verify or document that information as accurate. The date is also given as 16 December 1857, which I have not been able to verify. This information could be private information that the Johnson Family has. I provide it here as information that someone needs to check out if at all possible. I try as much as possible to document the information that I place into my website. While I cannot verify this information, it is information that is plausible, but it needs verification.
       On September 28, 1874, Christian and two brothers arrived in New York City on board the ship, Deutschland, from Bremen, Germany, origin Russia. They were without their parents and sisters. They arrived prior to the remainder of the family. There are questions that are raised about this situation.
What is the reason for this early departure?
Why the family split up? Was it monetary?
When these three arrived, where did they go?
Who met them in New York?
Where did they go? Who gave them directions to the Dakotas? (Carl must have known something.)
There may be other questions as well.
       Karl did know something and he wrote about it. See Karl Wacker and the document the wrote under Histories. This is important information. [KlW 03.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Christian Wacker is a 23 year old, white, single male. He was born in Russia of parents who were both born in Russia. He is at home. Nothing further is given in the census record. He lives with his parents, Henry and Catherine, and two sisters: Barbara and Magdalene. The family lives in Bon Homme County, Dakota Territory. [HW 01.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Christian Wacker (spelled Wakker) is a 43 year old, white, married male. He was born in Russia of parents who were both born in Russia. He is married to Elisabeth Kaiser and has been married to her for 18 years. He emigrated to the U. S. in 1874 and has lived in the United States for 26 years. He is a naturalized citizen. He is employed as a salesman of dry goods. He has not been unemployed. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He owns his own home free and clear. He lives with his wife, Elisabeth, and six children: Paulina, Helena, Hulda, Clara, Edmund, Minna. The family lives in Township 99, Range 56, Hutchinson County, South Dakota, in an unincorporated village, Freeman Town. [ChW 01.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Christian Wacker is a 56 (?) year old, white, married male. He is married to Elisabeth Kaiser Wacker and has been married to her for 27 years. According to this census taker and the information given him, Christian was born in Germany of parents who were both born in Germany, all of whom speak German. This fact is in doubt since other information suggests he was born in Russia. However, the reader will either have to make up his/her mind or do more research on the issue. Christian speaks, reads, and writes English. He is a retail Merchant, who runs a department store. He is an employer. He owns his own home, free and clear. He lives with his wife, Elisabeth, and seven children: Helen, Hulda, Clara, Edmund, Minna, Freda, Ruth. The family lives in the unincorporated village of Garrison, Township 141, range 14, McLean County, North Dakota. [ChW 02.]
       In the 1915 North Dakota Census, there is not much information provided. Christian Wacker is a foreign born male. He is living with his wife, Elizabeth, also foreign born, a daughter Helen, who is between 20 and 60, a son Edmund, between 5 and 20, and three daughters, between five years and 20, all white. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County, North Dakota. [ChW 07.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Christian Wacker is a 60 year old, white, married male. He was born in Russia of parents who were also born in Russia. Both he and his parents spoke German. He owns his own home free and clear. He immigrated in 1875 and is a naturalized citizen. He reads, writes, and speaks English. He has no employ at the present moment. He lives with his wife, Elizabeth, and two daughters, Elfrieda and Ruth. The family lives in the city of Garrison, McLean County, North Dakota. [ChW 05.]
       In the 1925 North Dakota State Census, Christian Wacker is a 68 year old, white foreign born male. He lives with his wife, Elizabeth, a white, 60 year old, foreign born female. Two children live with them: Helen, 20-60 year old female whose actual age is not give, Ruth, 17, in the 5-20 year old category. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County. [ChW 08.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Christian Wacker is a 71 year old, white, married male. He was born in Russia of parents who were also born in Russia. He spoke German before entering the United States. This census record indicates that immigration took place in 1883, eight year later that in the last census record. I would tend to believe the earlier record. It also indicates that he is a naturalized citizen. He owns his own home that is valued at about $4,000. He is married to Elizabeth Kayser. That marriage took place when he was about 23 years old or in about 1879. He is able to read, write, and speak English. Christian is not employed in any occupation at this time. He lives with his wife, Elizabeth, and two daughters, Helen and Ruth. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County, North Dakota. [ChW 06.] 
Wacker, Christian (I2408)
 
1785        The birth place of Elisabeth Kayser is given in the Johnson Family Tree on Ancestry.com as Johannesfeld, Odessa, Russia. It has not been possible to verify or document that information as accurate. The date is also given as 8 Jan 1865, which I have not been able to verify. This information could be private information that the Johnson Family has. I provide it here as information that someone needs to check out if at all possible. I try as much as possible to document the information that I place into my website. While I cannot verify this information, it is information that is plausible, but it needs verification. The death certificate from North Dakota, informed by Edmund Wacker, the son of Elizabeth Kayser, does verify the date correctly. However, another place is given - Alexanderhilf, Russia, as the place of birth.
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Elisabeth Kayser Wacker (spelled Wakker in the census) is a 35 year old, white, married female. She was born in Russia of parents who were both born in Russia. She has been married to Christian Wacker for 18 years and probably became a naturalized citizen of the U.S. at the time of marriage. She emigrated to the United States in 1878 and has lived in the U. S. for 22 years. She has given birth to seven children, six of whom are still living in 1900. She has no occupation outside the home. She reads, writes, and speaks English. She lives with her husband, Christian, and six children (Paulina, Helena, Hulda, Clara, Edmund, Minna). The family lives in Township 99, Range 56, Hutchinson County, South Dakota, in an unincorporated village, Freeman Town. [ChW 01.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Elisabeth Kayser Wacker is a 48 year old, white, married female. She is married to Christian Wacker and has been married to him for 27 years. She has given birth to nine children, eight of whom are still living at the time of the census. According to this census take and the information given him, Elisabeth was born in Germany of parents who were both born in Germany, all of whom speak German. This fact, that is the fact of birth, is in doubt since other information suggest she was born in Russia. however, the reader will either have to make up his/her mind or do more research on the issue. Elisabeth reads, writes, and speaks English. She has no employ outside the home. She lives with her husband, Christian, and seven children: Helen, Hulda, Clara, Edmund, Minna, Freda, Ruth. The family lives in the unincorporated village of Garrison, Township 141, range 14, McLean County, North Dakota. [ChW 02.]
       There is not a lot of information in the 1915 North Dakota Census. Elizabeth Kayser Wacker is a foreign white female. She lives with her husband, Christian Wacker, a white foreign male, and a daughter between 20 and 60, Helen, a son, Edmund, between 5 and 20, and three daughters between five years and 20. All of the children are native born. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County. [ChW 07.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Elizabeth Kayser Wacker is a 53 year old, white, married female. She was born in Russia of parents who were both also born in Russia; all three spoke German natively. Elizabeth immigrated to the U. S. in 1879 and became a naturalized citizen. She speaks, reads, and writes English. She has no occupation outside the home. She lives with her husband, Christian, and two daughters, Elfrieda and Ruth. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County, North Dakota. [ChW 05.]
       In the 1925 North Dakota State Census, Elizabeth Kayser Wacker is a 60 year old, foreign born female. She lives with her husband, Christian Wacker, a 68 year old, white, foreign born male. She also lives with with two children: Helen, whose specific age is not listed, but who is categorized as a 20-60 year old, white female. The other child is Ruth, 17, listed as between five and 20. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County. [ChW 08.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Elizabeth Kayser Wacker is a 65 year old, white, married female. She was born in Russia of parents who were also born in Russia. Prior to coming to the United States, she spoke German. Elizabeth is married to Christian Wacker. They married when she was 17 years old. She is not in school, but she reads, writes, and speaks English. According to this census record, immigration took place in 1888, nine years later than in the previous census record. I would tend to believe the earlier record. She is a naturalized citizen. She has no occupation outside the home. Elizabeth lives with her husband, Christian, and two daughters, Helen and Ruth. The family lives in Garrison, McLean County, North Dakota. [ChW 06.]
 
Kayser, Elizabeth (I2409)
 
1786        The birthdate for John is calculated from the death record. 1731-81=1650.
       The death record reads:
              Holbrook, John, May 3, 1731 [h. Abigael] a. 81, G.R.2 
Holbrook, John (I2340)
 
1787        The name Robert Lange with the middle initial, M., is found in the 1910 U. S. Federal Census. It could be assumed that the M. stands for Michael, the middle name of his father, Johann Michael Lange. [DLL]
       There seems to be relatively little known about Robert Lange, probably because he died relatively early in the lives of those who are still alive [cousins in 2002]. If the Family Tree Maker Family Archives CD# 356 refers to this Robert Lange, he arrived in the US in 1883, probably New York City, aboard the SS Hammonia in steerage. [This date seems correct since Robert's birth date is 1865 and the Robert Lange of the record was 18 years of age.]
       The SS Hammonia III was built for the Hamburg America Line by J. G. Thompson of Glasgow. It was launched on 13 September 1882, weighing 3, 969 tons, 373 feet X 34 feet, with a straight bow, two funnels, three masts. It was made of steel; its propulsion was by screw with a service speed of 15 knots. It accommodated 150 people in first class, 100 in second class and 700 in third class. Its maiden voyage was February 28, 1883 and its last voyage was on November 10, 1889. [JosL 02.]
       U.S. National Archives & Records Administration searches found Robert Lange arriving on April 25, 1883 on the SS Hammonia in New York; the ship departed from Hamburg, then Le Havre prior to arrival in New York. The ship's manifest identification number was 80349.
       The record for Robert Lange reads as follows:
Last Name: Lange
First Name: Robert
Age: 18
Sex: Male
Occupation: Laborer
Literacy: Unknown
Country of Origin: Saxony Altenburg
City/Town of Last Residence: Unknown
Destination City/Country: USA
Transit and/or Travel Compartment: Staying in the USA [Transit] Steerage [travel]
Manifest Identification Number: 80349 [RL 13.]
       An actual copy of the page of the SS Hammonia manifest with Robert Lange's information on it is included in the notebook under Robert Lange. [RL 08.]
       According to the undocumented obituary, after coming to the United States in 1881 [1883], he lived for a year in Ripon, Wisconsin. He was a farmer who had six sons and a daughter. He lived for almost ten years in South Dakota. There is conflicting information in his undocumented obituary and that of his wife, Emilie. His obituary indicates that he lived in South Dakota from 1881 to 1891; her obituary indicates that they moved to South Dakota after they were married and lived there for ten years before returning to Fairchild, Wisconsin, probably early in the period 1900-1910. I tend to believe the latter since Dale Lange's father, Max, was born in South Dakota in 1899; he was the next to youngest in the family. Ella, Arthur, Paul, Walter, and Otto were also born in South Dakota. Only Armin was born in Wisconsin. However, the former could also be true, since the marriage certificate indicates that when they were married, he was a farmer in Madison, South Dakota.
       The gravestone for Robert Lange reads Robert Lange, Sr. The "Senior" distinguishes this Robert Lange from a nephew, Robert H. Lange, son of Herman Lange.
       Judith Anne Schlegelmilch (Macke) [JAS 01] ways: "My mother (Loris) remembers her grandfather, Robert, as being strict and didn't play with the children, but would always give them a piece of chocolate when they left. They always looked forward to the candy."
       In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Robert Lange, a white, 35 year old, married male, lives with his wife, Ameila [sic] and six children: Ella, "Archie," Otto, Paul, Walter, and Max, the latter being just a baby in Lake County, Wentworth Township, South Dakota. His birthday is in July; he was born in 1865; has been married for nine years. Robert was born in Germany of parents who were both born in Germany. He immigrated to the United States in 1880; he has been in the U.S. for 20 years; and, he is a naturalized citizen. He is a farmer, has not been unemployed in past months. He speaks, reads, and writes English. He owns his farm. [RL 07.]
       Robert Lange became a naturalized citizen on December 26, 1905 in Black River Falls, Jackson County, Wisconsin [RL 10]. Emelie became a naturalized citizen at the same time, according to Emily Peters of the Murphy Library-Special Collections, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, letter dated 01/30/2006: "Until 1922 women automatically achieved citizenship when her husband naturalized, or when they married a citizen. Also, since women could not vote until after 1919, many single women probably didn't bother to naturalize, as there was no practical reason to do so." [RL 11.]
       In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Robert Lange is a 40 year old, white, married male. He is married to Emilie Zech. He was born in Germany of parents also born in Germany. His occupation is that of farmer. He owns his own farm. He lives with his wife, Emilie, and seven children: one daughter, Ella, and six sons - Arthur, Otto, Paul, Walter, Max, and Armin [Armie]. They live in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 12.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Robert M. Lange is a 45 year old, white, married male. He has been married to Emilie Zech for 19 years. He was born in Germany (Posen) of parents who were also born in Germany (Posen). He entered the United State in 1882 and is a naturalized citizen. He reads, writes, and speaks English although his native language was German. His occupation is that of farmer working in the area of general farming. He owns his own farm, free and clear. He lives with is wife, Emilie, and seven children (Ella, Arthur, Otto, Paul, Walter, Max, Armin) in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin. [RL 09.]
       Robert Lange and Amelia [Emilie] Lange are found in the 1920 U. S. Federal Census [RL 04]. As head of the family, Robert owns his property freely; is male, white, 54 years old, and married. If I read the record correctly because it is blurry, the record states that he arrived in the United States in 1884; he became a naturalized citizen as of 1904; he reads, writes, and speaks English, but not as his first language; his first language is German. He was born in West Prussia, as were both his mother and father, who both spoke German; he has no particular trade. [RL 04.] Only two children reside with them, Paul W. Lange and Max Lange, my father. Robert, Amelia, Paul, and Max live in Cleveland Township, Jackson County, Wisconsin.
       In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, Robert Lange is head of household with only himself and his wife. No children are present at this time. It is two years prior to the death of Robert and nine years prior the death of Emilie [Amelia]. They live in the town of Fairchild, no longer on a farm. Robert is a married, white, 65 year old male. According to the record, he married at age 25. He speaks, reads, and writes English although his first language was German. He owns his home, has a home worth $1,400 and he owns a radio. He was born in Germany of parents who were also born in Germany. The record indicates that he immigrated to the U.S. in 1881 (1883?) and that he is a naturalized citizen. Since there is not an occupation listed, in fact the slot states "none," it is assumed that he is retired from farming. [RL 06.]
        
Lange, Robert M. (I4)
 
1788        The note in the Hingham records, indicating when Michael Pierce arrived in the New World, reads: "1647 Michael Pearse (slain by the Indians in 1676)." [MJP 01.] This note is so far the most precise indication of when Michael Pierce arrived in the New World. However, Hobart could have recorded the date as 1647 when M. Pierce actually arrived earlier. I make this statement because the daughter of Michael, Persis was born January 07, 1646. If this birth is accurately recorded, then Michael would have had to arrive at the latest by 1645 with marriage in 1645. The question of M. Pierce's arrival in 1647 is severely questioned by the birth of his daughter, which is January 07, 1646/47. I have not found a marriage date for M. Pierce and Persis Eames. - DLL
       However in Lincoln, George. (1893). History of the Town of Hingham, Massachusetts. Vol. III. Hingham, MA: Published by the Town, pp 108-09. [Reprint: Higginson Book Company, Salem, MA.], there is an indication that Michael may have lived in HIngham as early as 1645 [see below]:
       PEIRCE (Pierce; Pearce; Perse).
       Michael, appears to have been a resident of Hing. between 1645 and 1666. In 1647 he purchased lands in the Conihasset. His first w., whose name I have not ascertained, d. in Hing. 31 Dec. 1662. A few yrs. after he removed to Scit., and took a sec. w., whose dhiris. name was Ann. "He was a captain of great bravery, and in Philip's War commanded a company of fifty Englishmen, and twenty friendly Indians fromn Cape Cod at the Pawtucket fight in Rehoboth, where on the 27th of March, 1676, he and most of his command were killed." (Dean's "History of Scituate.")
       Ch., mentioned in his will, and prob. b. in Hing., were --
       i. Persis, bt. in Hing. Jan. 7, 1645-46; prob. m. 1695, Richard Garrett of Scit. [This is NOT correct as the last child of Michael and Persis Eames was born Dec. 26, 1662, a second Persis. She married Richard Garrett. --DLL]
       ii. Benjamin, ---. Not in Hing.rec's. "Captain;" d. at Scit., 1730, aet. ab. 73 yrs.
       iii. John, ---. Inherited land in Hing. by will.
       iv. Ephriam, birth not recorde in Hing.
       v. Elizabeth, birth not recorded in Hing.
       vi. Deborah, birth not recorded in Hing.
       vii. Anna, bt. in Hing. May 9, 1665
       viii. Abigail, bt. in Hing. May 9, 1665. m. Samuel Holbrook.
       ix. Abiah, ---.
       x. Ruth, ---
       Note. --- One dau, was b. in Hing. Dec. 26, 1662. [MJP 16.]
       (Mary Pierce Holbrook, not mentioned here, is mentioned in a typed version of Michael's original will [MJP 09, p. 129] and her name is visible in a photocopy of the original [MJP 15]. Deborah Pierce is not mentioned in Michael's will.)
       Below is one of several biographical sketches for Michael Pierce.
       Deane, Samuel. (1831). History of Scituate, Massachusetts, From Its First Settlement to 1831. Boston: James Loring; pp. 406, with Index. [Reprinted Bicentennial Edition by Scituate Historical Society, 1975.] Here, the Michael Pierce story is told in the following manner:
       Capt. MICHAEL PIERCE
had been a resident at Hingham or Weymouth, before he came into Scituate. He purchased lands in the Conihassett, 1647. His house was on the Cohasset road, one mile from the present north Meeting house, at the well known place where Elijah Pierce now resides, of the sixth generation that has possessed it.
       There is no record of Capt. Pierce's family here. Hobart's journal records, "Persis, daughter of Michael Pierce, baptized 1646," also "Michael Pierce's daughter born 1662 and Michael Pierce's wife died 1662." His first child may have been born at Hingham. Persis married Richard Garrett, 3d. 1695. Abigail married Samuel Holbrook 1682. He had a son Ephraim, who died early or removed.
       Benjamin married Martha, daughter of James Adams, 1678, (error - John Adams, the brother of James and Jane James were her parents) and succeeded to his father's residence. His children, Martha, Jerusha, Benjamin, Ebenezer, Persis, Caleb, Thomas, Adams, Jeremiah, Elisha, born from 1679-1699.
       John (also son of Capt. Michael) settled north of the Conihassett burying ground. He married Patience, daughter of Anthony Dodson, 1683; his children, Michael, John, Jonathan, Ruth, Jael, David, Clothier, born from 1684 to 1698.
       Hayward Pierce, Esq. late of Scituate, descended from Capt. Michael, through Benjamin (who married Martha Adams), Benjamin, who married Charity Howard and Jane Howard of Bridgewater, 1742 and 1750, daughters of Thomas. The sons of Hayward, Esq. are Hayward of New Orleans, Waldo and Bailey of Frankfor, (Maine), Elijah of Sciuate, (on the parternal residence), Silas of Boston, --and his daughters, the wives of Mr. Lincoln of Cohasset, Mr. Nathaniel Cusing, and Mr. Walter Foster of Scituate. Benjamin and Johathan, brothers of Hayward, Esq. removed to Chesterfield.
       Capt. Michael has left evidence on record in the Town, of his usefulness in publick affairs. But his memory is to be forever honored for the brave manner in which he fell in defence of his country. (See Military affairs).
       He was in the Narragansett fight in December 1675, and escaped with his life, but to fall in a more terrible conflict in March following. His will is dated 1675; and the preamble is in these impressive words: "Being, by the appointment of God, going out to war against the Indians, I do ordain this my last will and Testament: and first I commit my was to the Eternal God, &c." He then gives "to wife Ann [she was a second wife] the house which I last buildt, &c. To son Benjamin my present dwelling house -- To son John all my lands in Hingham -- to son Ephraim 5£ --to daughter Abigail Holbrook 5£ -- to daughters Elizabeth, Deborah, Ann, Abiah, Ruth, Persis, 50£ each." [MJP 14.]
       In a biographical sketch of Harvey Hunter Pratt (The Early Planters of Scituate: a History of the Town of Scituate, Massachusetts from Its Establishment to the End of the Revolutionary War. Scituate, MA: The Scituate Historical Society, 1929; pp. 325-29; MJP 02), the sketch describes Michael Pierce's life from 1647 through his death, but focuses on his life span in the New World, leaving his death as soldier to another part of the book. It reads as follows:
       "Capt. Michael Peirce the ancestor of this old Scituate family is generally credited with being here in 1647 when he bought land on the "Country Road" from the Conihasset partners.
       He was originally of Little Hingham (Cohassset) and certainly did not erect the home on his Scituate farm until after 1663 as is evidenced by the following receipt recorded by him (PCR [Plymouth Colony Records] IV, p. 89) in 1665:
"November 5th 1663.
Received by us Cornett Robert Stetson
and James Torrey of Scituate
of Micail Peirse of Hingham
the full and just sume of twenty
pounds for the use of Josiah Leich--
field of Scituate aforesaid;
which twenty pounds the said
Micaell Peirse was apoointed
to pay unto us for the use of
Josiah Leichfield afaoresaid by
the Court hold at N. Plymouth
in New England in the month
of June last past. In witness
wee have hereunto sett our
hands this day and yeare
first above written.
The marks of X Cornet Robert Stetson
James Torrey"
       "If there remains any doubt of the correctness of the assumption that Peirce did not come to Scituate to dwell until this time, it would seem to be set at rest by the entry which the "Bench" at Plymouth caused to be entered upon the records on June 5, 1666 (PCR, IV, p. 127) when it cashiered Captain Cudworth and the latter suggested "Mr. Peirse" for the place at the head of the Scituate train band from which he had been deposed. The Court replied--
       "and alsoe concerning Mr. Peirse we have not to object to him but that hee is a stranger to us."
Such a state of ignorance on the part of the Court to which Cornet Stetson and Isaac Chittenden were deputies could not have existed had Peirce been then of Scituate. It is readily understood however if he was a resident of Hingham in the colony of Massachusetts Bay.
       All of his nine children were born in Hingham. His wife died (1662) in bearing him the youngest Elizabeth and between this date and 1666 he had erected his home on the Egypt farm purchased from the Conihasset partners. Nine generations of his descendants have dwelt upon and tilled these same acres. Silas, the third of that name, occupying it at this writing. there is an element of devotion in this, frequently found in Pilgrim and Puritan families, but seldome in so marked a degree as the Peirce family. It began with Benjamin Peirce, son of Michael, who by the will of his father, made just before the latter started for Rhode Island in Phillip's War where he was soon to meet his death, came into possession of the homestead.
       In that will, of which Benjamin was made Executor, very generous legacies were given so that the Court "not knowing whether there will remain so much cleare estate, when debts and the widdowes mainenance are discharged out of the same, as will amount to salve the executor's portion intended by his father," made an appropriate order with the consent of the rest of the children by which the homestead was "salved" to the eldest son and to his descendants for two hundred and forty years.
       Before coming to Scituate Michael Peirce had upland assigned to him at White Head at Cohasset and a corresponding appropriate acreage of meadow in the first division. He also bought from William James Conihasset marshlands which had originally been allotted to John Woodfield. Beside the homestead at Egypt he build a second house which was given in his will to his widow, a second wife whom he had married but a few years before.
       His first public office was that of constable to which he was elected in 1667. By 1669 he had apparently become sufficiently well known to the colony court to be approved as captain of the Scituate military company. It was in this kind of public service that his abilities were especially conspicuous. His courage and constancy were brilliant in a company of brave and religious men. No greater tribute to his memory can be paid than the simple story of his death already told in these pages. He had demonstrated his willingness to surrender his individual interests to those of the public long before he sacrificed his life at Rehoboth for the safety of his colony. The occasion first arose in a contemplated expedition against the Dutch in 1673 when Peirce having married a second time was living comfortably on his farm surrounded by a family of growing children.
       In August, a fleet of vessels which had been set fourth by the United Netherlands and "his Serene Highness the Lord Prince of Orange to do all manner of damages unto their enemies both by water and land," appeared in the Hudson River and threatened the eastern end of Long Island which was then English populated. The Governor and Council of Connecticut relying upon the assistance of the Confederation (although the Commissioners from the other colonies were not at the time consulted) sent two of their number to the "commander-in-chief" bearing a letter in which they sought to know "your further actions." The communication states:--
       "And we must let you know that we and our confederates the United Colonies of New England are by our Royal Sovereign Charles the 2nd, made keepers of his subject's liberties in these parts, and do hope to acquit ourselves in that trust through the assistance of Almighty God, for the preservation of his Colonies in New England."
       This was on August seventh. As soon as the Commissioners could be called together they met at Hartford and ratified the action of the Connecticut authorities. It took until December to obtain action by the other colonies. Plymouth responded with one hundred men (PCR V, p. 135 et seq.). Captain Cudworth was placed at the head of the expedition but declined. Peirce was next in command as ensign at four shillings a day.
Although the commander of the fleet responded to the note of the Connecticut governor confirming his beliefs and fears as to his intentions, and stated:--
       "We do well believe that those that are set for keepers of his Majesty's of England's subjects will quite themselves as they ought to do for the preservation of the Colonies in New England; however we shall not for that depart from our further resolutions."
       The Plymouth men never left on the expedition. Despite elaborate preparations had made for it. Events had demonstrated that there was no occasion for Peirce services or for the departure of his command. The recital of the incident is of value as showing the readiness of this primitive militiaman to answer with his services when the call came, whether from his neighbors or the King's liege subjects in a distant colony, in the common defense. His prompt disposition on this occasion stands out the more attractively when compared with the refusal of Cudworth "to serve his country with the inevitable ruin and destruction of his own family." (The words are from Cudworth's letter to Governor Winslow, declining the command of the expedition.)
       Captain Peirce was not enrolled as a freeman until 1670. His civil activities were confined to servicing on the grand and coroner's inquests, as surveyor of highways and as selectman in the years 1672 and 1673.
       Like so many of the contemporaries of Capt. John Williams he did not escape embroilment with that ready litigant. In 1672 he with John Cushing and Jeremiah Hatch were sued by the former because as selectmen they had entertained an action brought by Captain Cudworth against him. Again when William Rogers and the owner of the Cedar Point farm were litigating over damages alleged to have been done to Williams property by his servant, William's brother-in-law Anthony Dodson, had appeared as a witness. Capt. Peirce was present at the trial and heard Dodson's testimony. He said that the latter had "either lyed horribly or notoriously or forsworne himself." Thereupon he himself was promptly sued; but an amicable adjustment was reached without a trial. It may have been that this settlement was effective in another respect. for when John, the second son of Captain Peirce became of age, he married Patience, the amiable daughter of Anthony Dodson." [MJP 02.]
       On page 175, Pratt describes the part in which Michael Pierce played in King Philip's War:
       "In March 1676 Captain Peirce marched to Patuxet where, he was given to understand, the Indians were gathered in a large force. Hubbard (Hubbard's Indian Wars (Drake's ED. 1865) Vol I Page 173) says of him:--"he being a Man of Resolute Courage, was willing to engage them, though upon never so great Disadvantage." It was this very resolute, not to say reckless, courage which was his undoing. Being apprehensive of the danger he confronted he dispatched a messenger to Providence to Capt. Edmunds for reinforcements. Aid from this quarter was not forthcoming however (See Hubbard, same volume, p. 175) and with his own meagre command he found the enemy and gave them battle. No sooner was the engagement commenced than he discovered that they largely out-numbered his own force. The Indians dissembled by crossing the river and Peirce followed in hot pursuit. This was as the enemy had planned; they led him into ambush. Once on the opposite bank, he was assailed from all around and all were slain." [MJP 06.]
       This is Pratt's account, which provides a general view of what happened. There are other details to include, which some of the other accounts give.
       For more modern accounts,see Schultz, E. B., & M. J. Tougias, King Philip's War: The History and Legacy of America's Forgotten Conflict. Woodstock, VT: The Countryman Press, pp. 276-81. Another account that I would recommend is Philbrick, Nathaniel. (2006). Mayflower. New York: Viking. 462 pp. An 18th century account, revised and printed in 1851, based on the accounts of Benjamin Church, is Church, Thomas, with notes and appendix by Samuel G. Drake. (1851). The History of the Great Indian War of 1675 to 1676, Commonly Called Philip's War. Also The Old French and Indian Wars, From 1689-1701. Hartford, Connecticut: Clearfield. 360 pp.
       Although I have requested permission to quote from the Schultz and Tougias book for this website, I was denied permission. Therefore, the reader will have to pursue the story of Michael Pierce in Schultz and Tougias for him/herself.
       There is much more to this story to be found in many sources. Shultz and Tougias suggest that at the beginning of King Philip's war, there were certain tensions between and among the settlements if not colonies and the British Crown. This war brought the English in the New World together for the next 100 years, until the Revolutionary War, before they sought independence from England.
       Pictures of Pierces Park, Nine Men's Misery Monument, and a 1992 plaque can be found here for Michael Pierce. They were taken by Tim Pierce, a very distant cousin, through one of Michael's children other than through my line, Benjamin. [DLL.]

THE WILL OF MICHAEL PIERCE OF SCITUATE

       Scittuate in the Government of New Plymouth 1675 January the 15. I, Michael Peirse, of Scittuate in the Government of New Plymouth in American, being now by the appointment of God goeing out to warr against the Indians, doe make this my Last Will and Testament. First I doe comitt my selffe and wayes unto the eternall God; nextly concerning that estate which God has blessed mee with, I thus depose:
       First, I give unto my beloved wife, Annah Peirse, dureing her life the westward of my now dwelling house in Scittuate aforsaid which I last built to dwell in and the bed in it with what appertaines to it, to use and dispose of as shee shall see cause; and the one halfe of my other houshold stuffe for her use dureing her life; and then to be desposed offe to my children as shee shall see cause. Alsoe my will is that for my wife's yeerly maintainence that my son, Benjamine Peirse, shall pay unto here twelve pounds per year, one halfe in money and the other halfe in provisions, and alsoe sufficient fierwood for her use in the house during her life.
       And I give unto my son, Benjamine aforsaid, my now dwelling house and barne in Scittuate aforsaid and all the land which I have in Scittuate exceptin that I bought of Benjamine Bates of Hingham and that which I bought of William James of Scittuate and except in the abovesaid westerly end of my abovesaid house during my wife's life as abovesaid; out of which abovesaid estate in house and lands given unto my son Benjamine, hee shall pay unto my aforsaid wife for her maintainance twelve pounds a yeer as abovesaid dureing her life and sufficient fierwood alsoe as abovesaid.
       And I give unto my son, John Peirse, all my lands in Hingham in the Massachusetts and my land in Scittuate which I bought of William James of Scittuate, paying out of it to my son Ephraim's two children, Azrikam Peirse and Ephraime Peirse, to each of them fifteen pounds att the age of twenty and opne yeers, provided that neither my son Ephraim aforsaid, nor either of his after him or by or under him shall goe about to molest my said son John, of or upon the accompt of the three or four acrees of meddow land in Hingham aforsaid which my father, James gave unto my said son Ephraim, which is not yett soe fully confeirmed to mee as by my son Ephraim's promise it should have bine.
       Alsoe I give unto my aforsaid son, Benjamine, all my moveable estate in cattle and boates and houshold goods and such like excepting that which I have desposed of to my wife as abovesaid; out of which said moveable estate my said son, Benjamine, shall pay these legacyes which I give to my children as followeth:
       First: I give unto my son Ephraime Peirse, five pounds. I give unto my daughter Abigaill Holbrook, five pounds. I give unto my daughter, Elizabeth Peirse, thirty pounds. I give unto my daughter, Sarah Peirse, thirty pounds. I give unto my daughter, Annah Peirse, fifty pounds. I give unto my daughter, Mary Holbrook, twenty pounds. I give unto my daughter, Abiah Peirse, thirty pounds. I give unto my daughter, Peirsis Peirse, fifty pounds. Alsoe, I give unto my grandchild, Elizabeth Holbrook, five pounds to be payde her by my son, Benjamine aforsaid, att her day of marriage or 21 yeers old. Alsoe I give to my grand child, Abigaill Holbrook, five pounds to be paidd her by my son John Peirse afrsaid, att her day of marriage or twenty one yeers of age.
       Also my will is that if it should please God that my beloved wife aforsaid should be visited with lamenes or sickness soe that the abovesaid 12 pounds per yeare be not sufficient to maintaine her in comfortable manor, that then what shalbe [thought] meet by my Overseers to be added for her comfortable maintainance [to be] equally payed her yeerly by my son, Benjamine Peirse, and my son, John Peirse, out of that estate which I have given them as aforsaid. Alsoe I make my [wife] abovesaid my Executrix and my son, Benjamine Peirse abovesaid, my Executor to thyis my last Will and Testament. And alsoe I, the abovesaid Michaell Peirse [do request] my trusty and welbeloved frinds, Cornet Robert Studson and Isacke [manuscript torn] and my Brother, Marke James, and my Brother, Charles Stockbridge, to be Overseers to this my abovesaid Last Will and Testament, to be Overseers to this my abovesaid Last Will and Testament. In witnes wherof [I have] sett my hand and seal this fifteenth of January 1675.
       Michael Peirse

Witnesses
       Benjamine Woodworth
       Charles Stockbridge

By reason of the dangerousness of the times and [manuscript torn] there wilbe a Court in July next; and the parties [state] that delayes may be prejudiciall to the estate [torn] Benjamine Woodward gave oath before mee [manuscript torn] unto Michaell Peirse signing, sealing and [torn] this was testified upon oath the fift of [torn]. [MJP 09.]

INVENTORY OF MICHAEL PIERCE'S ESTATE

An Inventory of the estate of goods and chattles of Michael Peirse, deceased, taken by us whose names are underwritten the 20th of Aprill 1676.

By his wearing clothesm house (stockings), purse, besides[som] are said to be left att Seconke
A bed, bolster & green rugg and 2 blanketts
A new bed, a new bolster and cotton rugg and a
blankett and coverlidd
Four pillowes
Seven paire of sheets, one with the other
One fine table cloth, 7s and 5 course table cloths
Six course towells
Two dosen of new napkins
Six pillow bears
Two new napkins
Four pillowes
Three paire of fine sheets
Five pillow bears and 1 towell
A coverlidd
Pewter of severall sorts
Eight napkins
A cubberd
Tin ware and an iron candlestick
Three brasse skilletts & 2 skillets & a warming pan
A brasse morter and iron pestell
Two iron potts and 2 iron kettles
A paire of brandirons and 2 tramells
Two fier shoells and three paire of tonggs and a gridiron
A spitt & driping pan and smoothing iron
Two flock bedds & a feather bolster and sheats and blanketts
One other bed and bolster
One woole bed, bolster and blanketts
A fann
A pannell & pillion and 3 sickls
Cotton yeare
A paire of iron stilliyards
Sheeps wolle and cotten wolle,
A pierce of sole lether
Two frying pans
A hatchell
Three guns and 2 swords
A table and forme and 3 chests
Tubbs, barrells, cheirs, meale sackes, spining wheels and other lumber
Cart & wheels, plowes, plow irons, yoakes, chaines
Six oxen
11 cowes
Three 2-year olds
Three yeer olds
31 sheep and 16 lambs
Swine
A marre and a year-old colt
Two boates
Debts upon bill
Sume totle 291₤ 01s. 06d.

       [Isaac] Chettenden
       [Charles] Stockbridge

       [Annah, the relict of Michaell Peirse, gave her oath] [MJP 10]

ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATE

Plymouth Court Orders V, p. 208, 22. July 1676

Wheras the Last Will and Testament of Captaine Michaell Peirse, of Scittuate, lately slayne on the countrye's service, bearing date the 15th of January, 1675, was presented under oath to this Court, wherin Benjamine Peirse is made Exicutor, this Court, considering the large legacyes in the said Will given, and not knowing whether there will remaine soe much cleare estate, when debts and the widdowe's maintainance are discharged out of the same, as will amount to salve the said Executor's portion, intended by his father, as by the said Will is declared, doe therefore order, that the said Benjamine Peirse, Executor, shall detaine and keep in his owne hand the land mensioned in the said Will, bought of William James, being the one halfe of a six acree lott of meddow, and also one quarter parte of each legacye by the said Will given, untill the Court shall see cause otherwise to order it, on theire being satisfyed concerning the clearnes of the said estate, the Executor being appointed to pay the resedue of the said legacyes and bequest, according to the Will, in the mean time. [MJP 11.]

ADDITION TO THE INVENTORY

An addition to the inventory of the estate of Captaine Micaell Peirse, deceased, presented to the Court held att Plymouth the first of November 1676 and ordered by them heer to be recorded as followeth:

According to the advice of the Court and by the request of Benjamine Peirse and his mother, Anna Peirse, wee whose names are underwritten have valued the lands and housing that did appertaine to Captain Micaill Peirse, deceased, to be aded to the Inventory of his estate in Court.

His lands in Scittuate given to his sone, Benjamine Peirse, being by estimation about sixty acres of upland and thriteen acrees of meddow land with the hous and barne wee value att two hundred fifty pound.
And his lands in Scittuate given to his son, John Peirse, values att 50£
And his lands and rights att Hingham given to his son, John, att one hundred thiry two pounds

       The totall sume: 432£

Scituate, October the 18th 1676 by us

       John Jacob
       Charles Stockbridge



 
Pierce, Michael (I992)
 
1789 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2254)
 
1790        There is much to know about the Wilson Brewer Family, his birth date and place, his marriage to Rhoda Stanley and Margaret Moore, the mother of some of his children (whether Rhoda or Margaret), exactly when he left Kokomo, IN, for Iowa, his real estate holdings, his personality, and his humor. The facts and the notes that are included and the questions that they raise have developed some speculation, which is also included. Some of that speculation has taken place between Dale L. Lange and Ted Crayne. Some is solely from Dale L. Lange. Some of the speculation has been cleared up and some has not. Birth dates of Wilson Brewer and Margaret Moore's children are estimates only since records in Indiana have not been sought. Other problems remain, but much more is known than in the beginning of recording information about this family. [DLL.]
       The following notes are in no particular order.
In the Warren H. Brewer book, History of Brewer Family of North Carolina, etc., the following paragraph is about Wilson Brewer [WB 29]:
       "Wilson Brewer was married on July 25th 1830 to Rhoda Stanley by Miles Marshall, J. P. in Wayne County. He later lived in or near Blountsville in Henry Co., Indiana, from which place he moved during 1850-1860 possibly to a point near Webster City, Iowa. Rhoda Stanley may have been a relative of Wm. Stanley who married Nancy Brewer."
Benjamin Roland ("Roll") Brewer's death certificate indicates that the birthplace of Wilson Brewer was Maryland. Other suggested birthplaces are Virginia and North Carolina. No one knows at this point. [DLL June 21, 2004.] Wilson Brewer's birth dates range from 1801 to 1814.
       Sarah Brewer, in her biography of Wilson Brewer in Appendix I of her book, p. 255, states that "Wilson Brewer was born in 1804, at Highcastle homestead on the James River in Virginia."
       It is possible that in the U.S. Federal Census of 1840 that the Wilson Brewer found in Jamestown Township, Wells County, Indiana is the same Wilson Brewer. I say that because the ages of the children and of his wife are approximately correct. There is another Wilson Brewer who is in Chatham County, North Carolina at the same time. I do not believe that the Wilson Brewer of this genealogy is that Wilson Brewer. Of course there is always the possibility of the third Wilson Brewer. However, the number of males and females of WB 28 matches those of the Wilson Brewer under consideration, and the ages also match quite well. Further, the correct number of children also matches. Two males 5 or under: Benjamin and John; 1 male 10 or under: Andrew J.; and, one female 5 or under: Sarah. The only thing disturbing is the age of the oldest male; it is underestimated at 30 or under. The age for Margaret Jane Moore is estimated correctly. However, I have also learned that census takers make mistakes and that people do not know when they were born. So, I am going to hypothesize that WB 28 is the Wilson Brewer here under consideration. [WB 28.]
       The U.S. Federal Census of 1850 of Howard Township, Howard County, Indiana taken on September 29, 1850 lists Wilson as 39 years of age, Jane (probably Margaret Jane), 38 years old, Andrew J., 18, Bolen or Benjamin Roland., 15, Sarah, 10, John T., 11, Julia, 5, and an unknown (?female?)child, 2. If, in fact, Wilson Brewer is 39 at this point, he would then have been born in 1811. [WB 06.] Yet, not even the birth year is clear.
       In the 1852 Iowa State Census, Wilson Brewer is listed in Cass Township of Polk County with four males and three females, one of which is a voter, assuming that is the head of family, Wilson himself. The total for the family is seven people. In this same census, there are other relatives: Nancy Stanley, probably the sister of Wilson, Nancy Brewer, whose husband has died in 1851, and a brother-in-law, Nathan Stanley. There is also a William O. Brewer that could be a brother to Wilson. I have other information about a William Brewer that will have to be processed before I can be sure. However, I believe this William later moved to Illinois. [WB 31 and DLL.]
       However, in the 1856 Iowa State Census for Boone Township, Hamilton (Webster) County, the record indicates that Wilson was 50 years old. While the record looks like 51, Nadine Dingman of Webster City, IA, a knowledgeable genealogist, tells me that what could look like a 1 is actually an unclosed 0 or u that census takers used to indicate a zero. If that is the case, then Wilson was 50 years old in 1856 and could have been born 1805-06. I have left the date of his birth between 1804-1806 in honor of Sarah Jane Brewers book, as well as the date on the Burial Mound in Brewer Park, but I think the date is probably closer to 1806. [DLL]
       If this is the Wilson Brewer family in the 1850 census, and I believe that it is, then Sarah Brewer-Bonebright's date of 1848 for the arrival of the Wilson Brewer family in Iowa may not necessarily be correct. On pp. one and two of their book, Sarah and Harriet indicate that the family left Kokomo, IN on September 15, 1848 and that it took six weeks to make the trip to what is now Hamilton County. In the preface to the book, Sarah herself says, p. xiv: "I make no claim for absolute accuracy in dates. Periods marking life epochs such as moving, building, births, weddings or deaths always were vividly impressed, and other incidents arrange themselves approximately in order." Thus, it is necessary to take the dates that Sarah gives with some flexibility. Actually, we can probably say that any record, even those that demonstrate great precision, need to be questioned, but some more than others.
In the Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Hamilton and Wright Counties, Iowa, Chicago: Lewis Biographical Publishing Co, 1889, an article about Wilson Brewer says: "Willson [sic] Brewer, one of the first settlers of Hamilton County, was a native of Virginia, but when four years old his parents moved to Henry County, Indiana, where he was reared and was there married to Margaret Moore, a native of Henry County. In 1850 they came to Iowa and settled in Hamilton County, Mr. Brewer entering Government land ten miles south of the present town of Webster City. He died in 1857, leaving a widow and eleven (?) children, five of whom are living--Benjamin R., Sarah Jane, William, Walter and Margaret. Jackson, John Thomas, Julia and Nancy are deceased. Mrs. Brewer is still a resident of Webster City, where she has made her home for so many years." [WB 01.]
       In Lee's History of Hamilton County, Iowa, p. 31, the following is stated:
       SETTLERS IN 1950
       "...In the fall of 1850 Wilson Brewer and family, and a nephew, William Brewer, and William Stanley and family arrived and settled near Bone's mill, with ox teams in covered wagons. They had a large tent which they set up. Game was so plentiful that Wilson Brewer was able to bring in a fin yearling deer and the party partook of a bountiful supper of venison.
       Wilson Brewer staked out a claim just south of the mill site, and built a cabin, but soon sold to his nephew, and coming up the river, staked out a new claim within the present boundaries of Webster City. Mr. Brewer was therefore the first settler within the present limits of Webster City." [WB 02.]
       In Lee's History of Hamilton County, Iowa, p. 53, New Castle is founded:
       NEW CASTLE
       "In the fall of 1854 Wilson Brewer and Wm. Frakes laid out the town of New Castle, now part of Webster City, and began selling lots. It was located on the west side of Boone river and consisted of eight blocks, lying between Division Street and the Illinois Central R. R. and east of Superior street as now seen on the maps of Webster City. The plat was two blocks wide and four blocks long and was the second town laid out in the county.
The laying out of this town and giving the place a name tended to bring this place into more notoriety, and homeseekers heard of it as they journeyed westward, and mad it a point to pass through on their way. Many arriving in that way being pleased with the location and surroundings concluded to stay and became permanent settlers." [WB 03.]
       In Nedra Brewer Adams' article on Edwin Wilson Brewer, she tells about the trip of Wilson Brewer and his family to Iowa: "...Wilson Brewer, together with four other families moved from Kokomo, Indiana by oxen and covered wagon. Wilson Brewer acted as leader and guide, and walked every step of the way to find the best paths around the swamps and endless sloughs. They left Indiana on September fifteenth 1848 (probably 1950) and arrived in Fort Des Moines, Iowa late in October of that same year. One of the party stayed in Fort Des Moines, lured by the cheap lots, $7.50 each, with payment a dollar a year until pair for. However, Wilson Brewer and the rest of the party continued north until they found an attractive spot on the Boone River at a site known as Bones Mill. There they built four log cabins and spent the winter.
       During the next two years the men explored the area north along the river, and in 1950, the Brewer family moved to an area near what is now the Brewer Museum. There they built a permanent log house, the first in the new town of Newcastle. Wilson chose this name because it reminded him of his boyhood home in Highcastle, Virginia.
[NB: I have not been able to find a Highcastle, Virginia. I have found a New Castle, IN which is in Perry County. It could be that Newcastle, IA was named after New Castle, IN.]
       In the summer of 1853, Wilson Brewer sent East for his nephew Amos to come and survey the area and plot the town of Newcastle. [EWB 05.]
       There were stories about Wilson Brewer that show his character, tenacity, and humor. In Lee, (1912),The History of Hamilton County, pp. 56-57, a couple of these stories are told:
       (a)Timber Stealing
       "We must not forget to mention a matter than had been going on ever since the settlement of the county but which began to be noticed about this time and that was what would now be called stealing timber off non-residents' lands. The fact was that much of the valuable timber lands had been entered by speculators who were holding it for a high price, to buy it and as the work of improving their farms could not be carried on without timber, they helped themselves to any timber not guarded by a settler...
       A story is told of Wilson Brewer that will illustrate how this thing was carried on. An eastern speculator came out to look after his property and stopped with Mr. Brewer. The next day Mr. B. took the man out to show him his land, which was timber land.
       On the way Mr. B. pointed out a piece of timber land here that he said belonged to Mr. So and So and said Mr. A. stole the timber of that; another piece belonged to another and Mr. B. stole the timber of that; finally coming to a strip of land that had evidently been well covered with timber said: This is your land and I stole the timber off of it and if you don't like it, I'll lick the h--lout of you." The fellow said he like it and returned east disgusted and let his land go to tax deed, never again paying any more attention to it. But if one settler was found taking timber belonging to another settler, it was made exceedingly torrid for him. In relation to taking speculators' timber the settlers reasoned like this: "The improvement of our land will necessarily increase the price of the speculator's land without his doing anything; therefore it is only fair that enough of his property be put into the improvements to make him pay in part at least for the cause of the advance of the price of his land," which seemed to be good logic, if it was not law... " [WB 18.]
       (b) Another "Wilse Brewer" story:
       "There had been a shooting match and "Wilse" had won a quarter of beef. That evening, before starting home, somebody stole the beef. One Beemas Hayden was accused of taking it, and Brewer having satisfied himself that he was the culprit went to his house next morning before Hayden was up and hauled him out of bed and gave him a sound thrashing. Nothing was done with Brewer for this, but Brewer went to the office of Esquire Russell and plead guilty to assault and battery and paid a fine of $5.00 on his own motion. When the grand jury sat next, they were proceeding to indict Hayden for stealing the beef. Brewer heard of it and went before the body and said that he had chastised the man sufficiently and asked that the case be dropped and the jury dropped it." [WB 18.]
       In 1855, probably because Wilson Brewer was successful as an entrepreneur, bringing people to the area, Newcastle saw considerable growth. While there was one regular hotel, the Brewers and the Beaches (?) also kept lodgers. [WB 19.]
       The death of Wilson Brewer is detailed in Brewer-Bonebright and Bonebright-Closz, pp. 257-58, as follows:
       "The immediate cause of the death of Wilson Brewer -- Founder and promoter of Newcastle -- was the effect of a knife wound inflicted by a boastful character named Prendegast.
       A presidential election bet had been made by the two men. Father wagered a twenty dollar gold coin against an overcoat of that price. After the election of James Buchanan, my father having won the bet, called upon Prendegast, in the store of Barton and Robinson on Bank and Seneca streets to fulfill the agreement, but he refused to comply with the request.
       A dispute rose. Prendegast, who was a young man, clinched my father and bent him over the counter. With a knife, which he evidently had in readiness, the assailant stabbed his victim several times in the back at the left shoulder. The clothing was cut into shreds, but only two thrusts penetrated the flesh. The wounds were not thought to be serious; and father requested that his assailant, who had been drinking, should not be taken into custody.
       A few days elapsed. When it was found that the victim's injuries would prove fatal, Prendegast eluded the officers and fled the country.
Wilson Brewer died in December 1856."
       Wilson Brewer did die in December 1856. While no death certificate has been located, the recommendation for the appointment of Andrew J. Brewer, his oldest son, by Margaret Brewer, as administrator of the estate took place on 26 December 1856. Wilson had to have died before this moment. [WB 24.] Andrew J. Brewer did formally accept the role of administrator on 29 December 1856. However, before much could have been done, Andrew J. himself died on March 07, 1857. The next oldest brother, Benjamin R. Brewer accepted the role of administrator, March 12, 1857. On January 09, 1857, a list of the personal effects of Wilson Brewer listed guns, cattle, horses, and pigs as personal effects.
       On March 06, 1866, Thomas B. Bonebright brought charges against B. R. Brewer of "waste and mal administration." B.R.'s response was submitted the next day, arguing that he was not guilty of either. He also resigned from being administrator of the estate of Wilson Brewer on the same day. [BRB 11.]
       The processing of Wilson Brewer's estate was complicated. In fact, it went on for years. As Sarah Brewer-Bonebright writes in REMINISCENCES OF NEWCASTLE, IOWA, p. 257:
       "My mother knew absolutely nothing of business methods. All legal papers -- land patents, deeds, mortgages and notes -- were delivered to the attorney, W. G. Berkley, and the administrator, A. J. Brewer, who died within two months. Much misunderstanding, interminable delays and technical tangles ensued and extended throughout the Civil war. The papers were carelessly looked after and father's holdings of land and personal property were dissipated in the adjustment and settlement of the estate." [WB 15.]
One example of claims on the estate is found in WB 16. And the group of papers that I (Dale L. Lange) have copied from the records of Hamilton County Probate indicate that the process did go on for years, even to 1875. [WB 17.] The records presented here are incomplete, but demonstrate the complexity of the estate and claims against it, as well as guardianships for the minor children of Wilson Brewer.
       Another issue was the mistaken deeding of land. The Legal Notice of 1861 [WB 23] indicates that some land that Wilson Brewer sold to Johnson and Rosanna Griffith land that had been misnumbered. This misnumbered land had then been sold to a Mr. Snodgrass who in turn had sold it to A. J. Brewer. In other words, a mess had occurred that had to be straightened out. [WB 23.]
       Forty years after the death of Wilson Brewer, his remains and remains of some of his children who died shortly after him were removed to the city cemetery. Below are three newspaper articles that relate the event:
       STANHOPE MAIL, Stanhope, IA (05 June 1897):
       Recalls an Early Tragedy
       "The remains of Wilson Brewer, one of the first white men to die in this city, after a lapse of more than forty years, were removed from the original place of interment on the hillside across the Brewer's creek bridge, at the foot of South Superior street, in the city cemetery, last Saturday. the little white-fenced enclosure had become a familiar land mark, and yet few aside from the earliest settlers were aware that that lone grave contained one of the pioneers and original owners of the beautiful site upon which this city is built -- and fewer still have knowledge of the tragic story of his death. In the Fall of 1856, Wilson Brewer, then a prosperous and hardy pioneer -- a reckless, free-hearted young man, whose word was as good as his bond -- became involved in a quarrel with a blacksmith at homer and was stabbed to death. He left a widow and a large family of children, one of whom is said to have been the first white child born in Hamilton county. History and the records of the primitive courts of justice of those early days are somewhat at variance as to the punishment of his murderer, but that he was never again seen alive in this part of the country is considered ample evidence that he was speedily and summarily punished. The remains of three children, one son and two daughters, who for many years shared this lonely resting place with their father, were also taken up and re-buried in our city cemetery on Saturday." [WB 12.]
       THE FREEMAN, Webster City, IA (02 June 1897):
"Saturday four bodies that have been buried over forty years were removed from the roadside in front of Wm. Greenwood's house to the Webster City cemetery. They were the bodies of Wilson Brewer and his three children, Nancy, Julia and John. Some pieces of the coffins were found and most of the bones were recovered and moved to the new resting place." [Julia was probably not one of these children since she appears in an 1860 U.S. Census, MJM 03.] [WB 13.]
       HAMILTON COUNTY JOURNAL, Webster City, IA (05 June 1897):
"Saturday last the bodies of Wilson Brewer and his three children, were removed from their resting place at the south end of Superior Street and re buried in this city cemetery. Brewer was one of the first white men buried in Hamilton county and was killed in a fight at homer. History does not record the fate of his slayer, but some of the oldest inhabitants have an idea what became of him." [WB 14.]

       Two articles describe the moving of the remains of the Wilson Brewer family to what is now Brewer Park in Webster City: One article is from the Daily Freeman Journal, 23 November 1934, p. 01, columns 6 & 7, continued on p. 8, column 1 & 2, "Bodies of Brewer Family, Founders of City, Moved to Site of Old Homestead." The second, the source of which I have not been able to trace, "Remains of Eight Moved to New Spot," was probably published November 23, 1934, most likely in Webster City. They are both reproduced here.
       "Bodies of Brewer Family, Founders of City, Moved to Site of Old Homestead"
       A work of much historical import in this community has just been accomplished with the removal of the bodies of Wilson Brewer and family from Graceland cemetery and their burial on a part of the old Brewer homestead where the first log cabin was erected in what is now Webster city. The Brewer family were the first white settlers in this community and Mr. Brewer was the founder of the city.
       It was 86 years ago this month - in 1848 - that the Wilson Brewer family came from Indiana to what is now Hamilton county. The party made the trip in covered wagons drawn by ox teams and were six weeks on the road. The weather was mild, however, so the family was favored on the journey. Wilson Brewer died in December, 78 years ago in 1856.
       Found Pioneer Museum
       Four years ago Frank A. Bonebright and his sister, Mrs. Harriet Carmichael, grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Brewer, conceived the idea of founding a pioneer museum to commemorate the methods and means of living followed by the early settlers of this community. Accordingly the hewn log cabin that had been erected by Wilson Brewer in 1850 - the second log cabin he built here - and part of another hewed cabin south of Webster City built in 1854 by the Groves family were re-erected and now house many of the pioneer belongings of early settlers.
       Two years ago this grandson and granddaughter of their pioneer ancestors tendered to the city of Webster City an eight acre tract of land - a part of the original Brewer homestead - as a park in which this pioneer museum is to be perpetuated by the city forever.
       Permission to Bury There
       Along with the acceptance of the gift by the city council, permission was given for the burial of members of the Wilson Brewer family on a site overlooking Brewer's creek where the first family cabin was built. And so this week the bodies of Wilson Brewer, his wife, Margaret, three young children, and Sarah Brewer Bonebright, her husband, Thomas, and their son, Frank Bonebright, the latter of whom died last spring, have found their final resting place in the soil they all loved and revered.
       In the short time devoted to collecting materials for the cabin museum, a varied assortment of material has been gathered. Much of it is education to the younger generation. Tales of hardships and the privations of pioneers are unknown to present day young people, but they are greatly interested in hearing about them and appreciate being permitted to the implements and utensils which were in common every day use in the homes of their ancestors.
       Keep Museum Open
       After the death of Frank A. Bonebright last spring many people thought this valuable museum might be closed, but Mrs. Carmichael has assumed charge of the historical cabin and conducts all visitors about the premises any time of the day. She wishes everyone to feel as much at home there now as visitors were at the Brewer home in pioneer days.
       School children are especially interested in the fireplace and its equipment, the spinning wheel, the old stairway, a cord bed, home made tools, iron pot tripod, mill wheel of 1859, side saddle, buffalo skulls, elk antlers, mounted goose and eagle, old books, documents, flint lock rifles, pistols, grandfather's clock and so many Indian knives, axes and ornaments that they cannot be specified.
       Children visit the museum a few times and then bring their chums to whom they explain the exhibits as they would recite a lesson. So it is to be inferred that they are interested in absorbing the historical data, which is unusually interesting for it has to do with the early history of this immediate vicinity. [The remainder of the article is a verbatim quote of the death of Wilson Brewer, reproduced above.] [WB 21.]

       "Remains of Eight Moved to New Spot"
       Transferred To Sight Of Original Homestead in Memorial Park Here
       On November 13th, 1934, Mrs. Harriet Bonebright Carmichael exercised the wishes of members of her pioneer family and removed the bodies of Wilson Brewer and wife and three children; Thomas Bonebright and Sara Brewer Bonebright, his wife and Frank A. Bonebright from Graceland Cemetery to a spot on the old homestead which was formerly the site of the original Brewer cabin. This spot was prepared by a large burial mound constructed of earth which will be seeded down and further beautified by shrubbery and two hard maple trees planted - one at each side of this mound. the large nigger-head boulder which Frank A. Bonebright; in his lifetime, secured from the Bridge Mason Farm east of town, will be placed on this mound upon which will be placed a bronze tablet indicating the historical data of this family.
       Historical Data Concerning This Pioneer Family
       Wilson Brewer, Mrs. Carmichael's grandfather, came to what is now Hamilton County, in 1848 and a few years later founded the town of New Castle, now the town of Webster City. The first permanent cabin was located on the exact spot where the burial mound "The Trail's End" and the family now finds a resting place after more than eighty-five years.
       The Pioneer Museum had long been an ambition of Frank A. Bonebright in order that the methods of living by early settlers might be retained in the minds of coming generations.
       Right in 1929, Frank and his sister Harriet Bonebright Carmichael, began a more or less active effort to collect pioneer material for the purpose above mentioned.
       The pretentious hewn log cabin (1850) which originally stood at the foot of Superior street next to Brewer's Creek, but which had been removed to a farm north of town, was generously donated by the Frohling family who owned it. It was returned to the former homestead, and together with the Groves cabin (1854) brought from south of town, these cabins were re-erected for the Pioneer Museum.
       Frank and Harriet, grandson and granddaughter of the first settler in Webster City have worked hand in hand to perpetuate pioneer ideals. The growth and popularity of the gathering of relics of olden times made it necessary to provide a means of its perpetuation; so having come into possession of the homestead, they jointly offered the acreage as a park, the cabins and contents, to the city of Webster City. The fit was graciously accepted, and in recognition of the historical significance of the location and pioneer material gathered, the City Council gave permission for the family of Wilson Brewer and the donors of the park and cabins, to be buried on the premises.
       On the site of the first permanent cabin on the bank of Brewer's Creek, facing the sun, the burial mound is located, -- there are interred the remains of Wilson Brewer, his wife, three children, Sarah Brewer Bonebright and her husband and their son, F. A. Bonebright. So here in truth is "TRAIL'S END."
       The Museum Well, you should visit it. The genial Frank, who died March 5th, 1934, will not be there to welcome you, but the doors are never closed to visitors. Mrs. Carmichael is anxious to dispense the pioneer hospitality at any time; whether convenient for her or not. The register records names of visitors from all over the United States yet there are many persons from our own town who have never seen the relics housed there.
       Fireplace, cooking utensils, spinning wheels (flax and wool), side saddles, buffalo robe, collection of 50 guns, case with a mammoth tusk, twenty-thousand or many times twenty thousand years old, according to the Iowa Historical department, which was found in the Chase gravel pit.
Indian knives, skinners, etc., found at Bone's Mill and declared to be the finest collection in Iowa that was all found in one place.
Spear heads, arrow point, game balls, Indian ceremonial pieces, fine case of tomahawks, Indian pipes, grinders, grand-father's clock 150 years old, candle molds, candle lantern, hand-made tools, broad axes, grain cradle, flail, ox-yokes, home-made boots, wooden shoes, cord bed, ash bark bottom chair and relics and mementos of pioneer days.
       Now that active collection of pioneer relics has ceased with the passing of Frank Bonebright. Any contributions to the museum will have to be made by the owners as funds as not available for purchase of mementoes or heirlooms; still Mrs. Carmichael would be glad "to receive such and will do her best to care for them."
       It is the hope and desire of many of the citizens of this community that the Wilson Brewer Memorial Park will be completed and beautified in honor of the work and efforts of this pioneer family in giving to this community this magnificent memorial, the museum and all that this part entails. [WB 22.]
       WILSON BREWER
       The Biographical Record of Hamilton County, Iowa. New York: S. J. Clarke, 1902, pp. 619-23. [WB 27.]
       As long as Webster City stands, the name of Wilson Brewer will be known to its citizens, for he was the founder of the town and was so closely associated with its beginning and with the work of development and improvement that he well deserves to be honored, and with pleasure we present the record of his life to our readers. His history, if written in detail, would largely be an account of the pioneer experiences of this portion of the state. He was born in Virginia, in 1814 [probably not Virginia; definitely not 1814 - DLL]. His parents were of English lineage and were natives of Maryland. When he was but four years of age he accompanied the family on their removal to Indiana, and there he acquired a limited education and became familiar with all the hardships sustained in life upon the frontier. When he was old enough to begin work upon his own account, he turned his attention to farming, having become familiar with the duties of field and meadow during his early youth. He married Margaret Moore, a native of Henry county, Indiana, [possibly Preble County, Ohio - DLL] and in 1850 [this date is correct -DLL] they left their home in the Hoosier state and started for Iowa, taking up their abode in Hamilton county. The journal was made in a prairie schooner drawn by ox teams. A paper read before the Old Settler's Society, in Webster City in 1891, and dictated by Mrs. Wilson Brewer, who was then seventy-three years of age, has largely furnished us with the account of the trip and the pioneer experiences. Six families, numbering forty people, had left Indiana on the 15th of September, and on the 1st of November Mr. Brewer and his family arrived in Hamilton county. They had crossed the Mississippi River at Burlington, and during the entire trip had not crossed a single railroad. Their first stop was made at Hooks' Point, now Stratford. there Mr. Brewer took his ax, dogs and gun and footed it to what is known as the Tom Williams farm. He was pleased with the site, for it afforded opportunity for the establishment of a mill there, and when he had erected a little log cabin he brought his family to the pioneer home that he had prepared. On the way to the home he cut down a tree and caught eight coons. The following year he secured a claim and removed to what is know known as the Eyer place. He afterward removed to a claim in what was called the Creek Bottom, securing land near the present site of Webster City. Later he removed to a place now called Lawn Hill, or the old steam mill site. There he cleared a portion of land and put in a crop of corn, making his home there for one year. On the expiration of that period he returned to the Eyer place, where he remained for two years, and then took up his abode at the present old home site. He lived there until 1857, when he was called to his final rest. All kinds of wild game, including deer, elk and many representatives of the feathered tribe, were to be had in abundance. In a two days' hunt on the outskirts of what is now Webster City Mr. Brewer killed twenty-seven deer.
       On one occasion the dogs caught a deer passing the house and Mrs. Brewer took his gun and shot it. It gave one bound and fell in the doorway. On the site of the present grist mill the family also kept a fish trap in the river, which was about six feet square, and every morning they found it full of fish. All supplies had to be obtained at Fort Des Moines. Trips were made in a covered wagon to that place, Mr. Brewer usually managing to take a lot of furs and venison with him to exchange, and by this means supplied his family with the necessaries of life. On one trip he was gone thirteen days, during which time his wife and her children, the eldest a boy of fifteen years, were alone. A quilt hung at the door was the only protection against the cold and against wild animals. The latter were numerous and were often fierce. Many nights Mrs. Brewer says that she retired while the wolves were howling not ten feet from the cabin. On one occasion two of her sons started on a hunting trip and a terrific storm came on, continuing for three days. The family were greatly alarmed for the safety of the boys, but afterward it was found that they had reached camp before the storm broke. While the snow fell and the winds raged they brought their calves, pigs and chickens into the cellar in order to prevent them from freezing to death. In the winter time they wished the warm weather would come, but found that it too had its drawbacks, for the mosquitoes were so numerous that the air was almost back with them, and the men working in the fields in hot weather took mushrooms, set fire to them and wore them in their hats in order to smoke away the insects. When Mr. Brewer sought a claim they found a place which he deemed suitable for the farm, and at once felled some trees and began the erection of a log cabin. They would place a few logs in position, then would build a fire in the middle so that by the time they had the logs placed the fire would have thawed out the ground and they used the mud so obtained for the plaster of the cabin. The chimney was built of sticks and mud and the cooking was entirely done from the fireplace. When a turkey or anything of that description was roasted it was hung by a twisted string from the mantle, so that it constantly whirled round as it roasted. Coffee mills were used in grinding corn for making "Johnny cake" and wheat for bread. The first table owned by the family was made of a dry goods box, and the chairs were but rude stools, blocks being fastened into three legs. Beds were made by boring a hole in the logs of the wall in which were placed poles, there were sustained at the outer side by wooden pins. The cabins were lighted by tallow candles, or some other primitive method. The candles were made by dipping a string into the grease and when it had cooled they would dip again and again until it had become of sufficient size.
       Unto Mr. and Mrs. Brewer were born eleven children: Andrew J., the eldest, married Harriet Frakes, and after his death she became the wife of John W. Lee, who is also now deceased, while the widow resides in Webster City. She had two children by her first marriage, Albert Wilson, and Andrew J., and three sons by the second union.
Benjamin R., the second member of the family, married Jane Frakes, and after he death he wedded her sister, Betsey, who is also now deceased. For his third wife he chose Julia Stone, who died, and later he married Nellie O'Roark. By his first marriage he had one child, Jane, the wife of George Carmichael, a resident of Woolstock, Iowa. To the second marriage came one daughter, Maggie, who married Frank Ellis. Four children were born of the third marriage, and one by the fourth.
       Sara Jane, the third member of the family of Wilson Brewer, was born in Indiana, August 27, 1839, and was married May 2, 1858 to Thomas Bonebright, who was born November 29, 1836, and their marriage was celebrated in Webster City, where they resided for a time and them removed to a farm in Wright county, Iowa, near Woolstock. There was built a log house and a poem has been written about this old log cabin by their daughter, Harriet M. Closz. There Mr. and Mrs. Bonebright lived until 1864, when they returned to Webster City, taking up their abode upon a part of the old Brewer homestead, which has since been their place of residence, where Mrs. Bonebright has been engaged in the raising of fine poultry, the place being known as the Riverside Poultry Yard, from which she has sold some very fine fowls. Mrs. Bonebright has been with the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company for the past twenty years in the construction and water supply department. Unto him and his wife have been born six children, of whom five are living: George W. Bonebright, born August 8, 1859, who was by trade a carpenter. He married Lenor Jane Meeks on the 1st of March, 1883. She died June 5, 1885, and he married Miss Katherine L. Johnson on the 24th of July, 1890. There was one child by the first marriage, Bernice Mildred, now the wife of Roy Ruilliard. By the second marriage there are found children -- Gladys, Kenneth, Myrtle I., and Arthur K.
       Harriet M. Bonebright, born February 26, 1861, in Wright county, was married May 8, 1879, to Theobald Closz, who was born April 18, 1856. They reside in Webster City, where Mr. Closz is engaged in the live stock commission business. They had one child, Inez R., born November 16, 1880, but died at the age of seven months. Mrs. Closz engaged in teaching school from the age of seventeen years until her marriage and has been a correspondent for various newspapers, being an active member of the American Press Writers' Association, also a member and the third vice president of the National Liberal Party. Mrs. Closz was a telegraph operator on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway for seven years and his wife acted as his assistant, when they removed to Chicago she learned stenography and typewriting. They resided in that city for ten years and are now living in Webster City. Mrs. Closz now devotes her entire time to literary pursuits. Wallace W., the third member of the Bonebright family was born January 25, 1863, and was married October 15, 1885, to Nettie Bolton, of Illinois, their home being now near Freeport Illinois, where they are engaged in farming. They have four children: Clarence, Roy, Harrison and William. Frank A. Bonebright, born April 16, 1868, is the only member of the family now living at the old home. He has been a member of the Iowa National Guards for over ten years, and enlisted in the Spanish-American war and during the summer of 1898 shared vicissitudes of camp life in Chickamauga park with the Fifty-second Iowa Regiment of Volunteers as corporal. After his return he was elected second lieutenant of Company C, of Webster City, which position he now holds. In 1900 he won the Iowa championship at two hundred yards on the state rifle range at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He has held for seven years the diamond company medal as well as several others for good marksmanship. He is now employed by the city in the electrical plant. Ella B. Bonebright was born February 2, 1876. She was graduated from the schools of Webster City, with the class of 1893, and taught school for three years, then went to Chicago, where she learned stenography and typewriting, returned home and entered an office, but afterward went to Des Moines, where she took a course as a professional nurse in the Drake Sanitarium. After devoting some time to this work, she was married to Myron L. Sheets, who is engaged in the real estate, loan and insurance business in Yale, Iowa.
William Brewer, the fourth child of Wilson Brewer, married Eva McCowan, and subsequently wedded Estella Comley. By his first marriage he had two children: Mabel, the wife of Frank Pearce [sic], of Webster City, Iowa, and Edward, who married Annie Smithy, resides upon a farm in Hamilton county. Three children were born to the second union, Lulu, Myrtle, and Elva.
Walter Wilson Brewer married Lillie Owen, and after he death he wedded Nora Johnson. The name of his present wife was Mary Burke and their home is in Hot Springs, Arkansas. By the second marriage there is one child.
       Margaret M., Born June 20, 1857, is the wife of F. L. Meeks, who is now a bridge builder and resident of Marshalltown, Iowa, and their children are Myrtle M., an expert stenographer; Carrol C., a bookkeeper, and Leroy L. Until recently Mrs. Meeks has resided on the old Brewer homestead, which still belongs to her. The children are unmarried.
       The deceased members of the Brewer family are: Jackson, John, Julia, and Nancy.
One of the most important works which Mr. Brewer accomplished and one which will last for all time, was the establishment of Webster City. He laid out the town, calling it Newcastle, but afterward the name was changed to that by which the place is now known. It stands as a lasting monument to his memory. In politics Mr. Brewer was a Democrat, but refused to hold office, content to do his duties of citizenship without the rewards of official preferment. His wife long survived him, passing away in 1896, he remains being interred in Webster City. She was then seventy-eight years of age. She was one of the brave pioneer women who, with husbands and fathers deserve great credit for what has been accomplished in Hamilton county. After the death of her husband she was left with the care of her large family of children. Under these circumstances she did everything possible for her to do for them. Mr. Brewer had made judicious investments and at his death was the owner of considerable real estate. Mrs. Brewer lived through the period of pioneer life here, witnessed the great changes which have occurred, and saw the county take its place in the front rank among the counties of the great state. Her mind was filled with many reminiscences of frontier days and she could relate many interesting and amusing incidents concerning the methods of living at that time. Everybody was Mrs. Brewer's friend, and he worth was acknowledged throughout the county. 
Brewer, Wilson (I974)
 
1791        There is some confusion over the birth date of Barbara. The census records seem to be consistent in suggesting that she was born in 1849. However, there is a specific birth date given in Some Descendants of Jesse Adams, 1789-1844. I will leave the birth date as 1849 unless I am provided with other information. [DLL]
       In the 1850 U. S. Census, Barbara is listed as a one year old female. She was born in Illinois of parents who were born in Kentucky (father) and Illinois) mother. She lives with her parents (James W. and Lucinda), two siblings (George T., Jesse), and Isaac M. Henry, an 11 year old, who was born in Ohio, in Old town (South Side), McLean County, Illinois. [JasWA 01.]
       In the 1860 U. S. Federal Census, Barbara Elizabeth is an 11 year old female. She was born in Illinois of parents who were born in Kentucky (father) and Illinois (mother). She lives with her parents (James, Lucinda), two sisters (Mary, Martha) and three brothers (George, Jesse, James) in Hamilton Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. She has been in school and probably speaks, reads, and writes English. [JasWA 02.]
       In the 1870 U. S. Federal Census, Barbara Elizabeth Adams Root is a 20 year old female. She is married to Martin Luther Root. Her role is that of keeping house and being a mother for she has two children, Frank, a son, who is two years of age, and Sara, a daughter, who is 7 months. Both were born in Iowa. Her husband was born in New York; Barbara was born in Illinois. The family lives in Boone Township, Hamilton County, probably near Webster City, Iowa. [MLR 01.]
       In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Barbara Elizabeth Adams Root is a 31 year old white, married female. She is married to Martin Luther Root. She was born in Illinois of parents who were born in Kentucky (father) and Illinois (mother). She is keeping house. She lives with her husband, Martin, a son Frank, and three daughters: Butie, Olive, and Cleo. The family lives in Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [MLR 02.] 
Adams, Barbara Elizabeth (I1808)
 
1792        There seems to be a year difference in the birth of Mary C. Brown. Her death certificate indicates 1858; the 1900 U. S. Federal Census indicates the birth year is 1857. [DLL.]
       In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Mary Catherine Brown Kendall is a 29 year old, white, married female. She is married to Gustavus S. Kendall; his second wife. She was born in Indiana. Her parents were not foreign born. She lives with her husband, Gustavus, two of his children by a marriage to Isabelle C. Bonner (Minnie, John), and two of her children by the marriage to Gustavus (Franklin, Agnes), and a James Brown, who could be her brother, in the town of Alta, Buena Vista County, Iowa. [GSK 11.]
       In the 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Mary C. (Brown) Kendall is a 43 year old, white, married female. She has been married to Gustavus S. Kendall for 24 years. She was born in Indiana of parents born in Wisconsin (father) and Indiana (mother). She has no occupation outside the home. She reads, writes, and speaks English. She lives with her husband, Gustavus, five children ( Franklin, Agnes Little, Blanche, Eva, Ida), Waye Little, the husband of Agnes, and Edward Kesterson, a servant, on Market Street in Aberdeen, Chehalis, Washington. [GSK 13.]
       In the 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Mary Kendall is 53 year old, white, married female. She is married to Gustavus S. Kendall and has been married to him for 35 years. She has given birth to six children, five of whom are living. She was born in Indiana of parents who were born in Wisconsin (father) and Indiana (mother). She reads, writes, and speaks English. Her occupation is that of keeper of furnished rooms. She is employed on her own account. She was not out of work on 15 April 1910 and she was not out of work any weeks in 1910. She rents her home. She lives at 218 Heron Street, 4th Ward, 2nd precinct, Aberdeen, Chehalis County, Washington with a daughter, Ida. Her husband, Gustavus, but listed as George, shows up on another sheet of the 1910 Census, but at the same address. [MCatB 02.]
       In the 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Mary C. (Brown) Kendall is a 59 year old, white, widowed female. She was born in Indiana of parents who were both born in Ohio (?). She reads, writes, and speaks English. She has no occupation outside the home. She rents her house. She lives with her daughter, Ida Taylor and a grandson, Kendall Taylor, at 311 West Wishkah St., Ward 5, Precinct 1, Spokane, Greys Harbor County, Washington. [MCatB 03.]
       In Gustavus S. Kendall's 1919 Hospital Record at the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Mary C. (Brown) Kendall is given two addresses:
              1. 310 N. Heron St., Aberdeen, Washington
              2. 313 Wishka St., Aberdeen, Washington
       Mary Catherine Brown Kendall died on 24 October 1922 at 408 1st Street in Montesano, Grays Harbor County, Washington. She was 64 years, 7 months, and 4 days old. A son-in-law, Philip Charette, the husband of Eva Kendall, paid for the funeral. She is probably buried alongside her husband, Gustavus S. Kendall. That fact has yet to be determined. [MCatB 04.]
       On April 13, 2009, Dale L. Lange called the Montesano, Washington, City Hall to connect with Deanne (1 360 249-3021, Ext. 106) to find the grave of Mary Catherine Brown Kendall upon advice from the Whiteside Family Mortuaries in Montesano. I learned that shel is buried in Wynooche Cemetery, First Edition, Block 8, Grave 5. Gustavus S. Kendall purchased five graves at this site on September 10, 1891. [GSK 15.]
 
Brown, Mary Catherine (I2365)
 
1793        To understand the division of cattle fact, it is necessary bring more of the text of the Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England to bear on the item. On May 22, 1627, a meeting was held by the whole "companie." It is assumed that all of the members of the Colony were involved (including James Adams, who could only have been a small child, establishing the fact that he was born prior to May 22, 1627). The cows and sheep were divided among groups, 13 individuals in a group. As the text reads (Pulsifer, David, ed. (1861). Records of the Colony of New Plymouth of New England, Vol. 12. Boston: William White Press, pp. 9 and 11. [JAe 03.]):
       "At a publique court held the 22th of May it was concluded by the whole Companie, that the cattell wch were the Companies, to wit, the Cowes and the Goates should be equally deuided to all the psonts of the same company and soe kept vntill the expiration of ten yeares after the date aboue written. And that euery one should well and sufficiently puid for there owne pt vnder penalty of forfeiting the same .
       That the old stock with halfe th increase should remaine for comon use to be deuided at thend of the said terme or otherwise as oction falleth out, and the other halfe to be their owne for euer.
       Vppon wch agreement they were equally deuided by lotts soe as the burthen of the keeping the males then beeing should be borne for common vse by those to whose lot the best Cowes should fall and so the lotts fell as followeth/thirteene psonts being pportioned to one lot."
       John Adams, Eliner (Ellen)Adams, and James Adams were in the sixth lot.
       "To this lot fell the lesser of the black Cowes Came at first in the "Ann wth which they must keep the bigest of the 2 steers. Also to this lott was two shee goats."
       After John Adams died between July 01 and 24 October, 1633, and inventory of his "goods & chattel" were brought to Plymouth Court. That inventory is produced below. It was valued at 71 pounds, 14 shillings:
       "An Inventory of the goods & Chattels of John Adams late of Plymouth as they were prised by John Wynslow & John Jenny the 24 of Oct & presented in court upon Oath the 11th of Novbr Anno 9 Regni Dom. nri Carol. &c.
Inpr. 3/4 of a Cow one heyfer & a cow calfe 37 10 00
It 6 Swine 07 16 00
It 28 bushels of Corne 07 00 00
It 1ffether bed & bolster 03 00 00
It 1green Rug 2 blanckets 02 10 00
It 4 pr sheets 02 10 00
It 2 Table cloathes 00 04 00
It 6 Table napkins 00 04 00
It 6 pillowbeers 00 12 00
It 2 pillowes 00 04 00
It 2 Chests & a trunck 00 16 00
It 2 Cushens 00 03 00
It A Chaire 00 03 00
It A Smale wool bed 00 06 00
It 2 Iron pots 00 14 00
It 3 kettles 01 03 00
It 2 ffrying pannes 00 04 00
It pewter vessell 01 10 00
It 1 peece 01 10 00
It debts due for goods sold 03 10 00
It wooden vessell 00 05 00
       71 14 00
       The above menconed Joh. Adams dyed wthout will. ffor the disposing of this estate see the order of Court Novbr 11. Ao Regni Dom. nri Caroli nono &c. Book of Crt Ordrs from 1632 p. 39 (This line is in another hand.) [JAe 06.]  
Adams, John (I2366)
 
1794        When examining both the H.C. and F.C. Pierce Pierce Genealogies, as well as Family Trees on Ancestry.com or Genealogy.com, certain assumptions about the parentage of Martha Adams have been made and stated as fact, namely that James Adams is her father and Frances Vassall, daughter of William Vassall of Scituate, is her mother. Even Dean makes the same error (Dean, Samuel. (1831). History of Scituate, Massachusetts, from Its First Settlement to 1831. Boston: James Loring, p. 325) [MA 05]. I have found that not to be the case. In two sources (Wakefield, Robert S. (1979) "Men of the Fortune: John Adams." The American Genealogist 55:212-14; and, (1879) [MA 06]. "Family of John Adams of Plymouth." New England Historical Genealogical Record 33:410-13) [MA07], Martha Adams has been designated as the daughter of John Adams, a brother to James Adams, and Jane James. Thus, for the purpose of this genealogy, Martha Adams is the daughter of John Adams and Jane James and the wife of Benjamin Pierce of Scituate. This relationship will be established in further text below.
       On page 214 of American Genealogist 55 (1979):212-14, at the bottom of the page, the text reads:
       "Children of John Adams, first three by Jane James
       i. Mary, bapt. 14. Dec. 1656, Scituate, as 'd. John of Marshfield, great grandchild of widdow [sic] James' (Scituate VR). Living unm. 8 Aug. 1672 when mentioned in Kenelm Winslow's will.
       ii. Daughter, b. 17 Feb. 1657 (Marshfield VR 4); bur. 19 Feb. 1657 (ibid. 3).
       iii. Martha, b. 6 March 1658 (Marshfield VR., 5); m. 5 Feb. 1678 Benjamin Pearce (Scituate VR). Martha, wfe of Capt. Benjamin Peirce [note pearce, peirce same name - DLL] d. 3 may 1730 in 73rd Y. (Scituate VR) Benjamin m. (2) 23 July 1718 Mrs. Elizabeth Perry (Scituate VR). He was son of Capt. Michael Peirce (History of Scituate 325). Benjamin and Martha had ten children (Scituate VR)."
       From (1879). "Family of John Adams of Plymouth." New England Historical Genealogical Record 33:410-13. [MA 06.], the following text is quoted from this article:
       James and John Adams are brothers, the sons of Ellen Newton and John Adams.
       "2. James Adams (John) "resided on a farm on the Marshfield side of North River, nearly opposite Mrs. Vassall's , the father of Mrs. Adams...His widow Frances had 150 acres of land laid out to her by the Massachusetts General Court, May 7, 1673...His [James] children were:
       i. William, b. May 16, 1647;
       ii. Anna, b. April 18, 1649;
       iii. Richard, b. April 19, 1651;
       iv. Mary, b. Jan. 27, 1653
       v. Margaret (no record of birth, bapt. March 18, 1654
       3. John Adams (John) settled first in Marshfield, admitted freeman in Plymouth Colony, June 1 1658; appointed constable in Marshfield, June 5, 1660. He subsequently removed to Flushing, Long Island; Children of John and Joane Adams 1st wife, and Elizabeth 2nd wife, Flushing, are many, in fact 15 in all. Only the first three are listed here:
       i. Mary, b. 3.5.1656; d. 19 Feb 1657 Marshfield
       ii. Martha b. 4.1.1658 [Note: Perhaps the Martha Adams, who by Scituate town records married Benjamin Pearce, Feb. 5, 1678. They had ten children, the first names Martha, and the last Adams Pearce - Letter of C. E. Bailey.]
       iii. Rebecca, b. 13.12.1661; m. Henry Clifford of Flushing, 29,3,1686.
       John Adams' first wife appears to have died after the birth of Rebecca.
       In a sketch of John Adams, the father of James and John in Anderson Robert C. (1995, 2000). The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vols. I-III. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, p. 98, the wife of John Adams is Jane James (Mar VR 1) and Elizabeth ____ {TAG 55:214.)[MA 09.] The Marshfield Vital Records establish the marriage of John Adams and Jane James.
       In the examination of these published records, it is almost certain that:
       1. James Adams and Frances Vassall are not the parents of Martha Adams, the wife of Capt. Benjamin Pierce. Although one can never be completely certain, their progeny did not include Martha Adams.
       2. It appears that John Adams and Jane James were husband and wife; they are the parents of Martha Adams. While one cannot be completely certain, it is the evidence of these three articles that leads me to conclude that the Martha Adams, daughter of John Adams and Jane James is probably the wife of Capt. Benjamin Pierce, m. February 05, 1678.


 
Adams, Martha (I903)
 
1795        While there is very little information in the 1925 North Dakota State Census, this is the first time that Alvin Wacker, a male has appeared in the Karl K. Wacker family. He is five years old. He lives with his parents, Kare (48) and Lisabeth (45), three brothers: Arthur (20), Aron (18), Friedrich (14) and a sister, Lora (10). The family lives in Wishek, McIntosh County, North Dakota. [KKW 02.]
       In the 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Alvin Wacker is a nine year old, white, single male. He was born in North Dakota of parents who were born in South Dakota (father) and Russia (mother). He is in school currently; he reads, writes, and speaks English. He has no occupation outside the home. He lives with his parents, Karl and Elisabeth, and four siblings: Arthur, Aron, Lora, Herold. The family lives on McIntosh Street, Ward 2, Wishek, McIntosh County, North Dakota. [KKW 05.] 
Wacker, Alvin (I2751)
 
1796               Shirley Jensen, 65, Webster City
       Shirley Jensen, 65, of Webster City, IA, died Friday at Southfield Wellness Community in Webster City. A Visitation will be held at the New Testament Church in Webster City on Monday from 5-7 PM. The funeral will be on Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the church with Rev. Richard Laird officiating. Burial will be in the Graceland Cemetery in Webster City.
       She was born to Leland LeRoy Riley and Phyllis Gayle Weedman on May 24, 1943 in Webster City. Shirley graduated from Lincoln High School. She married Darrel Roger Jensen on November 3, 1961. Her last place of employment was at Custom Meats.
       She was a member of New Testament Church of Christ where she was involved with women's fellowship and Bible study. She loved spending time with her family and participating in all the activities at Southfield Wellness Community.
       Survivors include her mother: Phyllis Fister; daughter: Julie (Murray) Coleman; and son: Bryan Jensen all of Webster City; two sisters: Sandy Hetland & Debbie Consier of Missouri; brother: Danny Riley; two grandchildren: Whitney Coleman and Eric Coleman; great grandchild Makenzie Coleman; and former husband and friend Darrel Jensen; as well as stepsister and brothers, nieces and nephews.
       She was preceded in death by her father, stepfather Hank Fister and sister Cindy Helton.
       Boman Funeral Home in Webster City is handling the arrangements. [SR 01.]
 
Riley, Shirley (I2554)
 

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