Evaline Elizabeth McKowan

Evaline Elizabeth McKowan[1]

Female 1855 - 1909  (54 years)

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  • Name Evaline Elizabeth McKowan 
    Born 9 Sep 1855  Lakin's Grove, Iowa, an unincorporated village that no longer exists Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Female 
    Census 1860  Clear Lake Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Age: 4 
    McKowan, Edward P. household, 1860 U. S. Federal Census; Post Office Lakins Grove, Clear Lake Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [EMP 04.]
    McKowan, Edward P. household, 1860 U. S. Federal Census; Post Office Lakins Grove, Clear Lake Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [EMP 04.]
    Edward P. McKowan and wife, Emeline (Whitney) McKowan; children from more than one marriage: George, Martha, Franklin (Morgan), Eveline, and Emeline McKowan; and, Gustavus S. Kendall, stepson of Edward from his marriage to Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan.
    Census 1870  Freemont Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Edward P. McKowan household, 1870 U. S. Federal Census, Fremont Township, Hamilton County, Iowa.      [EPM 05.]
    Edward P. McKowan household, 1870 U. S. Federal Census, Fremont Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [EPM 05.]
    Edward P. McKowan; his wife, Emaline Whitney McKowan; their children: Evaline Elizabeth, Emeline A., Josephine, Thomas, Mary, Joseph, and Rue Anna McKowan
    Census 1880  Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    1880 U. S. Federal Census 
    Age: Abt. 25 
    William Granville Brewer household, 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa.  [WGB 03.]
    William Granville Brewer household, 1880 U. S. Federal Census, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [WGB 03.]
    William Granville Brewer; his wife, Evaline McKowan Brewer; their children: Mabel and Edward Brewer.
    Census 1885  Cass Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    McKowan, Edward P. household, 1885 Iowa State Census, Cass Township, Iowa
    McKowan, Edward P. household, 1885 Iowa State Census, Cass Township, Iowa
    Edward P. McKowan, wife, Emaline, Sons Joseph, Lafayette, Asa, daughters, Rue Anna, and Leona McKowan; his daughter Evaline Elisabeth McKowan Brewer and her son, Edward Brewer.
    Census 1900  Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa.       [DCW 04.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa. [DCW 04.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch; his wife, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan Brewer Welch; their melded children: Maude, Della, Jessie, and Earl Welch.
    Died 11 Sep 1909  Methodist Hospital, Des Moines, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Buried 14 Sep 1909  Graceland Cemetery, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa; Memorial ID: 183841503. Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10
    Evaline E. KcKowan Brewer Welch [EM 04] and Dighton Carlos Welch [DCW 08.]
    Evaline E. KcKowan Brewer Welch [EM 04] and Dighton Carlos Welch [DCW 08.]
    Person ID I576  Lange Pierce
    Last Modified 25 May 2019 

    Father Edward P. McKowan,   b. 1 Aug 1822, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jul 1892, Muscatine, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Lucinda Lakin,   b. Abt 1821, Pennsylvania, according to the 1850 U.S. Federal Census Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1857, Lakin's Grove, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 36 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married 25 May 1854  Kane County, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Notes 
    • The date of issuance of the marriage license was 8 May 1854; the marriage took place 25 May 1854 by Charles F. White, Justice of the Peace; the license was returned on 17 June 1854.
      In addition to Evaline Elizabeth McKowan, an infant child was born to this marriage, name, birth date, death date, burial have not been recorded. [BALa 01.]
    Family ID F242  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 William Granville Brewer,   b. Abt Feb 1853, Webster City, Boone Township, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN, Unkown - disappeared (See Notes) Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 28 Jul 1873  Baptist Church, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [12, 13
    Notes 
    •        The date and place of the divorce between William and Evaline is as yet unknown, but William remarried in 1878.
    Children 
    +1. Mabel Clair Brewer,   b. 14 Jun 1876, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Apr 1958, St. Francis Hospital, Breckenridge, Wilkin County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
    +2. Edward Wilson Brewer,   b. 18 Nov 1877, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1936, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)  [Birth]
    Photos
    Brewer, Mabel C.
    Brewer, Mabel C.
    Wife of Frank O. Pierce
    Last Modified 31 Mar 2017 
    Family ID F9  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Dighton Carlos Welch,   b. 22 Jun 1856, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Dec 1935, Jewell, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 2 Apr 1890  Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Notes 
    • DIGHTON CARLOS WELCH
      by
      Barbara Jean (Welch) Mize
      My first distinct memory of my grandfather is of being carried in his arms on the occasion of looking at an empty house which we were soon to move into. During my early childhood, the family moved twice, once when I was three (1924) and again when I was five (1927). I can't be sure which of these dates is the instance I remember, but am inclined toward the earlier one, as, at five years of age, I would have been rather a big girl to be carried around. Assuming it was in 1924, he would have been 68 years old, and apparently a fit and vigorous gentleman.
      Other memories of Grandpa Welch are harder to pin-point as to date. He came every so often to "stay with us" and these stays seem to have lasted several months at a time. On one occasion, during the Depression days of the early 30's, both he and Aunt Jessie were there for an extended stay. At this time, furniture was bought to furnish a room for Aunt Jessie. We then lived in a large frame house with two bedrooms downstairs which were given to the two of them. Aunt Jessie's room had been used only for storage, but Grandpa slept in the "back room" which had been a play room and junk room for us kids. It also had housed the family sewing machine and ironing board, so there had to have been some adjustment to make some adjustment to make room for them. I do not recall having had my things in that room afterward but kept them in my bedroom upstairs.
      Aunt Jessie evidently was out of work at that particular time, as I was aware of correspondence and conversations related to job hunting. She had a desk in her room (or a writing table of some kind) and spent a lot of time working there.
      During this sojourn, Grandpa painted the outside of the house. One day while he was painting, the eaves of what today would be the car port, the ladder slipped and fell and he was left hanging by his hands from the roof. His cries sent Aunt Jessie running to replace the ladder and let him get safely down. I was very impressed by the fact that she ran out the door and stepped or jumped off the porch without using the steps. This was perhaps as height of three feet as there were about four steps. I am sure it was a very dramatic and dangerous incident, but not much was made of it by the gown-ups, at least not in my hearing. I arrived on the scene in time to see Aunt Jessie leap off the porch and replace the ladder while Grandpa dangled about twelve or fourteen feet above the ground.
      Grandpa was a very devout Christian and was faithful in church attendance. On Sunday morning, he would be dressed and ready to leave the house before anyone else. He always had a suit, a heavy wool suit, with vest. It seems to me his trousers were always too long so they wrinkled badly at the bottom. In fact it seems as if his whole outfit was too large, as well as being quite old fashioned. On occasion he would wear spats to keep his feet warm. these were gray wool, and the only ones I ever saw worn by a "real" person. I think he wore a black derby hat. It certainly was not a fedora like Daddy wore. He had beautiful wavy white hair which was always rather long and would curl around his neck beneath the hat. He always carried a very large Bible to church. And, when we arrived would always walk clear to the front of the church and take a seat in the first or second row, although the rest of the family sat much farther back. He cupped a hand over his ear to hear the sermon better and would give a loud "Amen" from time to time. He was always a favorite of the minister, and sometimes would be asked to lead in prayer. Grandpa prayed long and emotionally, and I was fidgeting and embarrassed on such occasions as all the other kinds knew who he was.
      At home, he was an avid listener to religious programs on the radio and would sit with his Bible in his lap and his head right near the loudspeaker, following the scripture reading and joining in the singing. He also asked the Blessing before meals, whether asked to or not.
      My mother was never exactly overjoyed to have him there, but she coped with it very patiently. Since Daddy was away from home frequently because of the type of work he did, most of the coping with Grandpa took place while she was there alone with him and three growing youngsters. Looking back today from a vantage point of "maturity," I can see that it must have been a trial for her. Daddy often left home on Monday morning to return only on Friday or Saturday. During weeks that he was "in the office," he would, of course, be away from the house all morning, home for lunch, then back to the office until 5:00. So my mother had to feed him, that is Grandpa, do his laundry, clean his room and keep him company day after day. I remember her battle with the tea cups. Grandpa like to drink hot tea, which she must have made special for him. It was not a customary drink in our house. When served his cup of tea, he put sugar in, then proceeded with as generous quantity of milk so that the cup would invariably run over. Then when he drank the tea it would drip on the tablecloth, his shirt front, etc. She once said that she had tried putting less tea in the cup to start with, but no matter how small the quantity of tea, he would add milk until his cup runneth over.
      Grandpa was very sociable, fond of people, and rather naive in his perceptions of mankind. He would leave the house for a walk, be gone for hours and return with stories of how he had walked to town, met a fellow in a store, or on a street corner, or in a park, and of what a fine friend he had made and what a good time he had had. He was oblivious to the fact that Mama had been almost frantic with fear he had met with an accident, became lost or some other dreadful happening. Since our house was on the very edge of Lexington, about three miles from down town, and he was for that day an old man, I can understand her concern. He, himself, never had any doubts that he could take care of himself adequately, and do everything still that he had always done. One time he met some people from a small church of rather an off-center denomination. They were friendly to him and invited him to attend their services so cordially that he wanted to do so. The church was located at quite a distance, clear across town. I think the people offered to come for him, but Daddy would not allow that, so he had to be driven all the way to that church and then picked up afterwards. I don't believe this lasted very long. My father was aware of the unfortunate results that can come from being overly trusting of strangers and Grandpa would have been a prime target if anything shady was in the offing. At least he had no money to be cheated out of, but he could easily have given the impression that he did, as he told stories of his various business enterprises, farms he had known, places he had been, etc. This was his idea of a good time, swapping stories with whomever he met.
      As far as his fourth marriage, to Walterina, I recall that my father and his sisters were very much opposed to it. There were long distance phone calls concerning the relationship, and in the 30's that was a sure signal of important business to discuss. After the wedding (I'm not sure how long after, but it was summertime), Grandpa, Walterina and at least one relative of Walterina's, I expect her daughter, stopped in Lexington for a few days on the way to Florida. At that time, I was a very shy child and not at all comfortable with strangers, so I didn't get to know any of them at all well. I remember Walterina as being a very short lady, probably less than five feet in height.
      At some time after they had continued on to Florida, and it may have been three months, six months or long, my recall on this is nil, there was a phone call from Grandpa asking to return to Kentucky. He arrived on the bus and again stayed with us for awhile. It seems that conditions in Florida were not as he had anticipated. He and Walterina were living with her daughter and the daughter was not at all pleased to have him there. He had been made to feel very uncomfortable, to say the least, and given "rules" to which he was expected to comply--so he left Florida. As far as I know, he never lived with Walterina again, which brings up some unanswered questions in my mind. Did they stay married? What became of her? Did he ever even see her again? My impression of this whole incident is that, despite the misgivings of the rest of the family, Aunt Jessie, with whom he was living, approved of the marriage. I suppose she had no other option, as legally he was an independent adult.
      When Grandpa's final illness came, I think he was with Elsie and Lew Rushia in Jewel, and I have always thought that's were he died, but I can't be sure of this. At any rate, his death followed Aunt Jessie's so either Elsie or Maud would have been caring for him. I think this was not too long after Uncle Al McGregor suffered a nervous breakdown due to the loss of his business, and it seems unlikely that Aunt Maud would have taken on the care of her father also. My father did not attend Grandpa's funeral in Iowa. He had made the trip from Kentucky up to Ames at the time of Aunt Jessie's death, and finances in the 30's did not permit another long trip so soon. [DCW 01.]
    Children 
    +1. Earl George Welch,   b. 6 Mar 1892, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Nov 1956, Fayette, Lexington County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)  [Birth]
    Last Modified 30 Jun 2006 
    Family ID F241  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    McKowan, Evaline E.
    McKowan, Evaline E.
    1st wife of William G. Brewer; 2nd wife of Dighton Carlos Welch; Great Grandmother of Dale L. Lange and others.
    Welch, Dighton Carlos
    Welch, Dighton Carlos
    2nd husband of Evaline E. McKowan

    Deighton Carlos Welch, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan Welch, and Earl George Welch, photo.
    Especially Eva Mckowan Brewer and Carl Dighton Welch; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Welch, but others as well, Prior to 1909, Photo.
    Especially Eva Mckowan Brewer and Carl Dighton Welch; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Welch, but others as well, Prior to 1909, Photo.

  • Notes 
    •        According to Lee, J. W. History of Hamilton County Iowa. Chicago: J. S. Clarke, 1912; p. 47, Evaline McKowan was born shortly after the arrival of the McKowan family in Hamilton County: "In the Spring of 1855, Luther Lakin left home, intending to get married and meet his father and other settlers on the Skunk (River), but he arrived about two weeks earlier than the rest and can therefore lay just claim to being the first settler in the east part of the county and in Lyon township. About two weeks after his arrival Elisha Lakin, B. A. Lakin, and E. P. McCowan came and all settled near each other. The men turned in and helped Mr. McCowan to build a cabin, which was the first house built in that part of the county. McCowan moved into his new house and shortly afterwards Evaline McCowan was born, being the first white child born in the east half of the county.
             In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline McKowan is a four year old female, who was born in Iowa of Edward P. McKowan and Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan. She is living in Clear Lake township with E. P. McKowan and Emaline McKowan. Her mother, Lucinda Lakin McKowan passed away in 1857. She is approximately four years old. EPM 04.]
             In the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan is a 14 year old, white, single female, living with Edward P. McKowan and Emaline Whitney McKowan. She is living in Fremont Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. She was born in Iowa of a foreign born parent (Edward P. - Canada) and Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan (Pennsylvania). She lives with her parents and six step bothers and sisters (Emerline, Josephine, Thomas, Mary, Joseph, and Anna). She is at school. [EPM 05.]
             In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan is married to William Granville Brewer. She is a 23 year old, white, married female who is keeping house. She lives with her husband in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. With Eva and William are two children - Mabel and Edward. Eva was born in Iowa of parents who were both born in Illinois (not true - the father, Edward P. McKowan was born in New Brunswick, Canada - DLL.] [WGB 03.]
             In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Evaline McKowan Brewer is living in dwelling 78, family 84, in Cass Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [She is probably divorced from William G. Brewer, although the census indicates that she is married.; She didn't marry D.C. Welch until 1890.] She is living alone with her son Edward next to the Edward P. McKowan family. She works as a seamstress. [EPM 11.]
             In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Evaline McKowan Brewer is married to Dighton Carlos Welch. She is living in Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa with her husband, three step daughters (Maude, Della, and Jessie) and a son (Earl G.). She has been married for ten years; she was born in September of 1853. According to this census, she has three living children. They would be Earl G. Welch, Mabel Brewer Pierce, and Edward Brewer. She was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Canada (Edward P. McKowan) and Illinois (Lucinda Lakin Kendall Morgan McKowan). She reads, writes and speaks English. [DCW 04.]

  • Sources 
    1. [S1733] Evaline McKowan (Brewer, Welch), death certificate no. 77 6299 September 11, 1909, Iowa State Board of Health, Des Moines, Iowa. [EM 01.].

    2. [S1734] See Lee, J. W. History of Hamilton County Iowa. Chicago: J. S. Clarke, 1912; p. 47. See also Evaline [Evelyn] McKowan (Brewer, Welch), Iowa State Board of Heath, state death certificate, No. 77 6299. [EM 01.].

    3. [S1737] Edward P. McCowan household, 1860 U.S. census, Hamilton County, Iowa, Clear Lake township, page 595, dwelling 275, family 242; National Archives micropublication M653, roll 323. [EPM 04.].

    4. [S1738] Edward P. McKowan household, 1870 U.S. census, Hamilton County, Iowa, Fremont township, page 281, dwelling 7, family 7; National Archives micropublication T593, roll, 394. [EPM 05.].

    5. [S1739] William Brewer household, 1880 U.S. census, Hamilton County, Iowa, town of Webster City, ED 102, page 187B, dwelling 14, family 19, National Archives micropublication T9, roll 342. [WGB 03.].

    6. [S1740] Edward P. McKowan household, 1885 Iowa State Census, Hamilton County, Iowa, Cass township, dwelling number 77, family number 83, page number 121, Family History Film 1021473, volume 193 in Quigg, Gary, comp. (2003). Iowa State Census, 1885 [database online], Provo, Ut: Ancestry.com. [EPM 11.].

    7. [S1741] Dighton C. Welch household, 1900 U.S. census, Wright County, Iowa, Woolstock township, ED 167, SD 3, sheet 9A, dwelling 152, family 152; National Archives micropublication T623, roll 468. [DCW 04.].

    8. [S1735] Evaline [Evelyn] McKowan (Brewer, Welch), Iowa State Board of Heath, state death certificate, No. 77 6299. [EM 01.] See also Evaline E. McKowan (Mrs. D.C. Welch) obituary, 16 September 1909, The Jewell Record. [EEM 04.].

    9. [S1736] Evaline [Evelyn] McKowan (Brewer, Welch), Iowa State Board of Heath, state death certificate, No. 77 6299. [EM 01.].

    10. [S9591] Evaline E. McKowan Brewer Welch. (2012). Ancestry.com. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database online]. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Memorial ID; 183841503. [EM 04.].

    11. [S7345] Nadine Dingman, Questions to Nadine Dingman with answers, genealogist, Webster City, IA [1623 Sparboe Court, Webster City, IA 50595-2733 May 14, 2003] to Dale L. Lange. [ND 01.] See also, McKowan-Morgan marriage, Kane County Court Records, Family History Film # 14801107. [September 27-June 27-1861, # 2142.] [EPM 16.] .

    12. [S7190] William G. Brewer and Evaline McKowan, 28 July 1973, marriage license 505, p. 176, Marriage Record, Book 2, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [WGB 02; EEM 02.].

    13. [S8732] Brewer, William G. and Eve E. McKowan Marriage, 28 Jul 1875, Wbster City, Hamilton County, Iowa, FHL Film No. 1404699, Reference ID: 2:3C0XRP1; [WGB 07.].

    14. [S7344] Welch-McKowan (Brewer) Marriage, 29 April 1890, Marriage Record Book 1A, p. 94, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [DCW 03 EEM 03.].


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