Dighton Carlos Welch

Dighton Carlos Welch[1]

Male 1856 - 1935  (79 years)

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  • Name Dighton Carlos Welch 
    Born 22 Jun 1856  Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Census 1860  Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    1860 U. S. Federal Census 
    Age: Abt. 4 
    Bold Dighton Welch household, 1860 U. S. Federal Census, Wakeman Township, Huron County Ohio.   [BDW 04.]
    Bold Dighton Welch household, 1860 U. S. Federal Census, Wakeman Township, Huron County Ohio. [BDW 04.]
    Bold Dighton Welch; his wife, Anna Bates Welch, their children: Delos, Carlos, Harvey, and Lewis Welch.
    Census 1900  Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    1900 U. S. Federal Census 
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa.       [DCW 04.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa. [DCW 04.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch; his wife, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan Brewer Welch; their melded children: Maude, Della, Jessie, and Earl Welch.
    Census 1910  Washington Township, Story County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    1910 U. S. Federal Census 
    Dighton C. Welch household, 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Washington Township, Story County, Iowa.   [DCW 05.]
    Dighton C. Welch household, 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Washington Township, Story County, Iowa. [DCW 05.]
    Dighton C. Welch, a widower; his children:Maude, Jessie, and Earl George Welch.
    Census 1920  Boone City, 5th Ward, Des Moines Township, Boone County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    1920 U. S. Federal Census 
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Boone, Ward 5, Des Moines Township, Boone County, Iowa.    [DCW 06.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Boone, Ward 5, Des Moines Township, Boone County, Iowa. [DCW 06.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch; his wife, Columbia Anna Hain Welch.
    Census 1930  Ames, Story County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    1930 U. S. Federal Census 
    Age: Abt. 73 
    Dighton C. Welch household, 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Story County, Ames, Iowa. [DCW 11.]
    Dighton C. Welch household, 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Story County, Ames, Iowa. [DCW 11.]
    Dighton C. Welch; his daughter, Jessie Louise Welch; and, his granddaughter, Carmen Rushia.
    Died 30 Dec 1935  Jewell, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Buried 2 Jan 1936  Graceland Cemetery, Hamilton County, Webster City, Iowa, Memorial ID: 158173959. Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10, 11
    Evaline E. KcKowan Brewer Welch [EM 04] and Dighton Carlos Welch [DCW 08.]
    Evaline E. KcKowan Brewer Welch [EM 04] and Dighton Carlos Welch [DCW 08.]
    Person ID I579  Lange Pierce
    Last Modified 7 May 2020 

    Father Bold Dighton Welch,   b. 17 Jul 1829, Buffalo, Erie County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jan 1901, Woolstock, Wright County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Anna Bates,   b. 1828, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jan 1870, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married 30 Oct 1847  Huron County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  [12, 13
    Family ID F251  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Nancy Louise Hunefeld,   b. 28 Jan 1862, Portland, Dodge County, Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Dec 1888, Carnavon, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 26 years) 
    Married 1 Aug 1880  Sac City, Sac County Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Children 
     1. Elsie Eliza Welch,   b. 12 May 1881, Delaware Township, Sac County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Maude May Welch,   b. 17 Aug 1883, Bell Prairie Township, Beadle County, Dakota Territory Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Della Hendricks Welch,   b. 10 Aug 1886, Bell Prairie Township, Beadle County, Dakota Territory Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Jessie Louise Welch,   b. 19 Oct 1887, Bell Prairie Township, Beadle County, Dakota Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Oct 1935, Martinsville, Morgan County, Indiana- Automobile Accident Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years)  [Birth]
    Last Modified 25 May 2019 
    Family ID F248  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Evaline Elizabeth McKowan,   b. 9 Sep 1855, Lakin's Grove, Iowa, an unincorporated village that no longer exists Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Sep 1909, Methodist Hospital, Des Moines, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years) 
    Married 2 Apr 1890  Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Notes 
    • DIGHTON CARLOS WELCH
      by
      Barbara Jean (Welch) Mize
      My first distinct memory of my grandfather is of being carried in his arms on the occasion of looking at an empty house which we were soon to move into. During my early childhood, the family moved twice, once when I was three (1924) and again when I was five (1927). I can't be sure which of these dates is the instance I remember, but am inclined toward the earlier one, as, at five years of age, I would have been rather a big girl to be carried around. Assuming it was in 1924, he would have been 68 years old, and apparently a fit and vigorous gentleman.
      Other memories of Grandpa Welch are harder to pin-point as to date. He came every so often to "stay with us" and these stays seem to have lasted several months at a time. On one occasion, during the Depression days of the early 30's, both he and Aunt Jessie were there for an extended stay. At this time, furniture was bought to furnish a room for Aunt Jessie. We then lived in a large frame house with two bedrooms downstairs which were given to the two of them. Aunt Jessie's room had been used only for storage, but Grandpa slept in the "back room" which had been a play room and junk room for us kids. It also had housed the family sewing machine and ironing board, so there had to have been some adjustment to make some adjustment to make room for them. I do not recall having had my things in that room afterward but kept them in my bedroom upstairs.
      Aunt Jessie evidently was out of work at that particular time, as I was aware of correspondence and conversations related to job hunting. She had a desk in her room (or a writing table of some kind) and spent a lot of time working there.
      During this sojourn, Grandpa painted the outside of the house. One day while he was painting, the eaves of what today would be the car port, the ladder slipped and fell and he was left hanging by his hands from the roof. His cries sent Aunt Jessie running to replace the ladder and let him get safely down. I was very impressed by the fact that she ran out the door and stepped or jumped off the porch without using the steps. This was perhaps as height of three feet as there were about four steps. I am sure it was a very dramatic and dangerous incident, but not much was made of it by the gown-ups, at least not in my hearing. I arrived on the scene in time to see Aunt Jessie leap off the porch and replace the ladder while Grandpa dangled about twelve or fourteen feet above the ground.
      Grandpa was a very devout Christian and was faithful in church attendance. On Sunday morning, he would be dressed and ready to leave the house before anyone else. He always had a suit, a heavy wool suit, with vest. It seems to me his trousers were always too long so they wrinkled badly at the bottom. In fact it seems as if his whole outfit was too large, as well as being quite old fashioned. On occasion he would wear spats to keep his feet warm. these were gray wool, and the only ones I ever saw worn by a "real" person. I think he wore a black derby hat. It certainly was not a fedora like Daddy wore. He had beautiful wavy white hair which was always rather long and would curl around his neck beneath the hat. He always carried a very large Bible to church. And, when we arrived would always walk clear to the front of the church and take a seat in the first or second row, although the rest of the family sat much farther back. He cupped a hand over his ear to hear the sermon better and would give a loud "Amen" from time to time. He was always a favorite of the minister, and sometimes would be asked to lead in prayer. Grandpa prayed long and emotionally, and I was fidgeting and embarrassed on such occasions as all the other kinds knew who he was.
      At home, he was an avid listener to religious programs on the radio and would sit with his Bible in his lap and his head right near the loudspeaker, following the scripture reading and joining in the singing. He also asked the Blessing before meals, whether asked to or not.
      My mother was never exactly overjoyed to have him there, but she coped with it very patiently. Since Daddy was away from home frequently because of the type of work he did, most of the coping with Grandpa took place while she was there alone with him and three growing youngsters. Looking back today from a vantage point of "maturity," I can see that it must have been a trial for her. Daddy often left home on Monday morning to return only on Friday or Saturday. During weeks that he was "in the office," he would, of course, be away from the house all morning, home for lunch, then back to the office until 5:00. So my mother had to feed him, that is Grandpa, do his laundry, clean his room and keep him company day after day. I remember her battle with the tea cups. Grandpa like to drink hot tea, which she must have made special for him. It was not a customary drink in our house. When served his cup of tea, he put sugar in, then proceeded with as generous quantity of milk so that the cup would invariably run over. Then when he drank the tea it would drip on the tablecloth, his shirt front, etc. She once said that she had tried putting less tea in the cup to start with, but no matter how small the quantity of tea, he would add milk until his cup runneth over.
      Grandpa was very sociable, fond of people, and rather naive in his perceptions of mankind. He would leave the house for a walk, be gone for hours and return with stories of how he had walked to town, met a fellow in a store, or on a street corner, or in a park, and of what a fine friend he had made and what a good time he had had. He was oblivious to the fact that Mama had been almost frantic with fear he had met with an accident, became lost or some other dreadful happening. Since our house was on the very edge of Lexington, about three miles from down town, and he was for that day an old man, I can understand her concern. He, himself, never had any doubts that he could take care of himself adequately, and do everything still that he had always done. One time he met some people from a small church of rather an off-center denomination. They were friendly to him and invited him to attend their services so cordially that he wanted to do so. The church was located at quite a distance, clear across town. I think the people offered to come for him, but Daddy would not allow that, so he had to be driven all the way to that church and then picked up afterwards. I don't believe this lasted very long. My father was aware of the unfortunate results that can come from being overly trusting of strangers and Grandpa would have been a prime target if anything shady was in the offing. At least he had no money to be cheated out of, but he could easily have given the impression that he did, as he told stories of his various business enterprises, farms he had known, places he had been, etc. This was his idea of a good time, swapping stories with whomever he met.
      As far as his fourth marriage, to Walterina, I recall that my father and his sisters were very much opposed to it. There were long distance phone calls concerning the relationship, and in the 30's that was a sure signal of important business to discuss. After the wedding (I'm not sure how long after, but it was summertime), Grandpa, Walterina and at least one relative of Walterina's, I expect her daughter, stopped in Lexington for a few days on the way to Florida. At that time, I was a very shy child and not at all comfortable with strangers, so I didn't get to know any of them at all well. I remember Walterina as being a very short lady, probably less than five feet in height.
      At some time after they had continued on to Florida, and it may have been three months, six months or long, my recall on this is nil, there was a phone call from Grandpa asking to return to Kentucky. He arrived on the bus and again stayed with us for awhile. It seems that conditions in Florida were not as he had anticipated. He and Walterina were living with her daughter and the daughter was not at all pleased to have him there. He had been made to feel very uncomfortable, to say the least, and given "rules" to which he was expected to comply--so he left Florida. As far as I know, he never lived with Walterina again, which brings up some unanswered questions in my mind. Did they stay married? What became of her? Did he ever even see her again? My impression of this whole incident is that, despite the misgivings of the rest of the family, Aunt Jessie, with whom he was living, approved of the marriage. I suppose she had no other option, as legally he was an independent adult.
      When Grandpa's final illness came, I think he was with Elsie and Lew Rushia in Jewel, and I have always thought that's were he died, but I can't be sure of this. At any rate, his death followed Aunt Jessie's so either Elsie or Maud would have been caring for him. I think this was not too long after Uncle Al McGregor suffered a nervous breakdown due to the loss of his business, and it seems unlikely that Aunt Maud would have taken on the care of her father also. My father did not attend Grandpa's funeral in Iowa. He had made the trip from Kentucky up to Ames at the time of Aunt Jessie's death, and finances in the 30's did not permit another long trip so soon. [DCW 01.]
    Children 
    +1. Earl George Welch,   b. 6 Mar 1892, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Nov 1956, Fayette, Lexington County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)  [Birth]
    Last Modified 30 Jun 2006 
    Family ID F241  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Columbia Anna Hain,   d. 1 Sep 1926 
    Married 20 May 1911  Des Moines, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    Family ID F249  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Walterena Cole 
    Married 1 Sep 1931  [17
    Family ID F250  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Welch, Dighton Carlos
    Welch, Dighton Carlos
    2nd husband of Evaline E. McKowan
    McKowan, Evaline E.
    McKowan, Evaline E.
    1st wife of William G. Brewer; 2nd wife of Dighton Carlos Welch; Great Grandmother of Dale L. Lange and others.

    Deighton Carlos Welch, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan Welch, and Earl George Welch, photo.
    Especially Eva Mckowan Brewer and Carl Dighton Welch; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Welch, but others as well, Prior to 1909, Photo.
    Especially Eva Mckowan Brewer and Carl Dighton Welch; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Welch, but others as well, Prior to 1909, Photo.
    Welch Families, photo
    Welch Families, photo
    DC Welch, photo
    DC Welch, photo

  • Notes 
    • In the Welch Family history, probably written by Barbara Jean Mize (DCW 01, p. 7], there is a description of D.C.'s pursuance of Evaline McKowan Brewer: "D.C. continues his wife search, eventually marrying Evaline (or Evalina) Elizabeth (McKowan) Brewer on April 2, 1890. For a time it was a race between himself and brother Harvey for the fair maid. Once when D.C. offered her a ride home from church, Eva rebuked him with a saucy, "If it had been Harvey, I'd have gone!" D.C. later told a friend, "That Eva McKowan's hair will be redder than it is now before I ask her to go any place!"
             Joe Dogget, a friend of D.C.'s from the Church of the Nazarene, played a guitar at the wedding. He tuned up with "Revive us Again!" The marriage proved a happy one, and the girls like their new stepmother. When one of the girls got a case of the giggles, Eva would tease, "Did you find a tee-hee bird's nest with a ha-ha's egg in it?" To this marriage was born George Earl Welch, Webster City, Iowa, March 6, 1892. By the time of the 1900 Census, they were living in Woodstock, Wright County, Iowa, together with their children: Maud, Della, Jessie, and Earl. Elsie had by then started her teaching career and boarded with the Frank O. Pierce family in Independence, Hamilton County, Iowa. Eva died September 9 [sic, 11], 1909." [Evaline was born on September 09.]
             In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Dighton Carlos Welch is a four year old, white male. He was born in Ohio. He lives with his parents, Dighton and Anna, and three brothers - Delos, Harvey, and Lewis Massac - in Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio. [BDW 04.]
             In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Dighton C. Welch is a 43 year old, white, married male. He has been married to Evaline Elizabeth McKowan Brewer for 10 years. He was born in June of 1856 in Illinois of parents who were born in Illinois (He was actually born in Ohio of parent who were born in New York (father) and Ohio (mother). He reads, writes, and speaks English. He owns his home free and clear. His occupation is that of harnessmaker. He has not been out of work. He lives with his wife and his children from another marriage - three daughters (Maude, Della, and Jessie) and one son - Earl G., a son with Evaline, in Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa. [DCW 04.]
             In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Dighton C. Welch is living in Washington Township, Story County, Iowa. He is a 54 year old, white, widowed male. Evaline died in 1909. He was born in Ohio of parents who were born in New York (father) and Ohio (mother). He reads, writes, and speaks English. He owns his home free and clear. He is not a veteran of the Civil War. He lives with two daughters (Maude and Jessie) and a son, Earl. He is a janitor at the Iowa State College in Ames. He is working on his own account. He was not out of work on April 15, 1909. [DCW 05.]
             In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Dighton C. Welch is a 63 year old, married, white, male. He can read, write, and speak English. He lives with his wife, Columbia, 906 West 1st Street in Boone City, Ward 5, Des Moines Township, Boone County, Iowa. He was born in Ohio of parents who were born in New York (father) and New York (mother - actually Ohio). He is a laborer in a round house, meaning he could be working for a railroad? He works on his own account. He owns his own home through mortgage. [DCW 06.]
             In the 1930 U. S Federal Census, D.C. Welch is a 73 year old, white, widowed, male. He was born in Ohio of parents who were both born in New York. He is not attending school, but he is about to read, write, and speak English. He does not live on a farm. He lives in a town, but does not own a radio set. He owns his own home, valued at $5,000. Dighton lives with his daughter, Jessie L. Welch and Carmen Rushia, a granddaughter,Carmen Rushia. The family lives at 1307 Kellogg Avenue in Ames, Story County, Iowa. [DCW 11.]
             In 1931, D. C. Welch attended the funerals of Merle and Lois Pierce in Webster City, Iowa. [DLL 06.]
      In the Welch Family history, written probably by Barbara Jane Mize, pp 3-8 are about Dighton Carlos Welch (June 22, 1856-December 30, 1935)
             "Much of what is known of D. C. Welch was written down by him during a stay with his son Earl Welch in Lexington, Kentucky. His "A Little History of My Life" consists of a scrambled narrative and anecdotes of his life covering the period from his childhood to his marriage to Nancy Louise Hunefeld.
      His autobiography begins and is tinted with a strand of recurrent melancholy which pervades the whole of this brief manuscript. From the beginning, we are told, "I suppose that my birthday was in the unlucky time of the moon as father said I cried until I was four years old." But these words were written near the end of a lifetime of disappointments.
             Writing in October, 1932, he recalled that his father took him to one of the revival meetings held by the famous evangelist Charles Grandison Finney. They also attended a magic lantern show, and D. C. "never forgot the slides of a Chinese swallowing mice" which ran down a ladder and into his mouth.
             "I had a wandering nature, for father said I went to Grandfather's house with a veterinary book under my arm when I was four years old and knocked at the door and wanted to know if they wanted to buy a Horse Farrier book as my father was a veterinary and had these books for sale and often went out and solicited customers."
             D. C. remained in Ohio until October, 1873 before returning to Iowa. The train passed through Chicago sometime after the fire. "The elevators filled with grain were still smoldering and the train in which I rode was carrying me to work for there were shanties all over Chicago as the black ruins could be seen everywhere."
             "I arrived at Webster City one cold morning in November and our shoes could squeak so we could be heard for blocks as the snow crunched under out feet." He waited there until night, when his brother arrived and drove him the remaining nine miles on a lumber wagon to the farm. they arrived about nine, put the mustangs in the barn and then kindled a fire. "I can see the old dog, Colonel, welcoming me as we came in sight of him, the playmate of years before. O, what a memory of our boyhood days. Could we but go back there again, I would give all the rest of my life. But those days have passed and gone never to return."
             "I shall never forget how the winter days brought such a homesickness as I paced the floor and looked out of the frosty window for many days to come, but finally got a chance to go in the city (?)...and this was partial relief. But Spring finally came and I went to work on a farm at $20 a month as I can recall." Through a rainy April he "longed to get to work in the field, but I can still taste the Boston baked beans every Sunday as I worked for a man that chose for his wife a real nice girl, one of the old-fashioned cooks."
      "I earned $160 that summer but gave my father one-half, but I have never been sorry that I stayed by my father until I was twenty-one years of age. Children, obey your parents for the hope of a long life."
             "After I became of age, I managed to get a team, harness and wagon but not a great deal of value...I rented 40 acres and summer-fallowed it by plowing on the fall planting it to spring wheat in the spring. There was a large growth of straw, but I only got about three bushels of poor wheat to the acre, and I took a load to Fort Dodge in hopes to get a little money to pay some debts, but what did I get? I had to stay overnight and got one sack of wheat flour and had no money left as I only got about 35 cents per bushel and only about 4th grade."
             "The same year, about 1878, I bought on contract 40 acres of raw land about half mile south of the Grout school house in Wright County at $6 per acre. Broke 20 acres, then after crop failure and after my first financial bust, I let it go back, loosing about $60, becoming quite discouraged. I let my new harness that I had bought go back to the harness maker in Webster City and loaded into the lumber wagon some hay, a few bushels of corn and started west no knowing where I was going, only that I was on the way."
             "Knowing that I had some relatives at Sac City, Sac County [Iowa}, I decided to go there and make them a visit. So after traveling through mud and crossing what was then Hell Slough in Pocohontas County, I finally arrived at uncle Washington Allen's one and a half miles east of Sac City, but my aunt would not let me go any further, so stayed there the rest of the winter attending school in the country [and]having a good time with the young folks. The next spring I was offered a school to teach in the country at $35 per month. I think three months. But my uncle offered me $25 per monthly for eight months with board for me and my team, so of course I took the farm work and never taught school. The next summer I would rig me out with a breaking team, so bought another horse and a pair of mules. Started to break prairie in April, but about the second week took the shaking ague and never quit shaking until sometime in June. I hired a man so had but very little left and traded mules for a half interest in a restaurant in Sac City. But the partner could not tell my money from his, so sold out to him at a great loss. So I was busted again. So you see I had been busted twice before I was married."
             "I lived at that time with my uncle; that is, I made that my home. One of the hired men became attached to me, and I was invited to his home and then introduced to his sister...The general outcome was [that I was] married the next spring [and moved] onto a farm of my father-in-law's, Louis Hunefeld. Lived there one year, but in the fall, I got the South Dakota fever, and a young man by the name of Zack Hess drove out, and I took a homestead. [I] had six months to make a residence. So I moved out in April, shoveled back the snow and built a shanty in one day. After the summer passed, built it into a sod house. For two years, never burnt anything to heat or cook with but Prairie Slough grass. After the fourth year, built a frame house. [I] had 120 acres Broke, 5 acres of trees planted, then came the hail storm after the worst winter known in South Dakota and took all but the 20 acres of wheat that was out."
             D. C. married Nancy Louise Hunefeld on August 01, 1880 in Sac City. She was the granddaughter of Phoebe Anne Lauton Hunefeld. Louise was born January 28, 1862 in Portland (Dodge County), Wisconsin and Died at Carnavon, Iowa on December 26, 1888. To them were born four daughters:
             Elsie Eliza, Delaware Township, Sac County, Iowa, May 12, 1881.
             Maud May, Bell Prairie township, Beadle County, Dakota Territory, August 17, 1883.
             Della Hendricks, Bell Prairie Township, Beadle County, Dakota Territory, August 10, 1885.
             Jessie Louise, Bell Prairie Township, Beadle County, Dakota Territory, October 19, 1887.
             We should not forget that their homesteading experience was quite typical. The homestead act (1862) provided 160 acres of land to anyone willing to live on it and improve it over a period of five years. the land was usually of poor quality, difficult to irrigate for farming and too small for grazing. A standard joke of the time went that "the government was willing to bet you 160 acres that you couldn't live on it for five years." Between 1862 and 1890, over two-thirds of the would-be homesteaders had failed.
             As described above, sod houses were the rule. Huge slabs of sod were cut from the prairie and piled upon each other. sometimes, families lived in shelters carved from hills. Walls were covered with newspaper. Whenever it rained, mud streamed through and dripped upon everything. Elsie Welch used the newspapers to teach Maud the alphabet. The elder sister also listened to Maud's prayers each evening. She cried one night when little sister fell asleep reciting, "Now I lay me down to sleep."
             About 1887, the family returned to Sac City, Iowa. That first winter, the girls stayed with their grandpa Hunefeld. there was a terrible snow storm. To keep warm, they burned some of the furniture. Ice was melted for water. In order to pass safely between house and barn, a rope was strung between them. Eventually they moved to Carnovan, Iowa, where Louise died the day after Christmas, 1888. On Christmas day, Louis had given Elsie a china doll and a dress for it.
      Little is known of Louise Welch apart from one anecdote. When Elsie and her sisters picked up some pins that had been swept out of someone's house, their mother lectured them sternly for taking what did not belong to them. Elsie must have been a high-spirited girl at that time. She led her sisters to someone's vineyard and helped herself to the wine. they were caught, and the farmer literally herded them back to their home with a buggy whip. Although the younger girls ran away, Elsie withstood the beating. When she reached her father's house, the man remarked upon Elsie's courage, not to mention endurance: "The others ran away, but Elsie walked straight as an Indian!"
      Following the death of Louise, D. C. felt that he could not care for the girls alone. He sought a second wife, often leaving Elsie to mind her sisters while he paid court. She would later recall her terror at being left in the house with the responsibility while wild storms shook the house. Eventually, D. C. decided to split up the girls for awhile. Despite Elsie's and Maud's tearful pleading not to separate them, Elsie was sent to stay with the Will Nail family and Jessie to stay with Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Heineman.
      While living with the Nail family, Elsie walked two miles to school each day. On one snowy day, she recalled walking slower and slower while singing, "I'm a poor little orphan. I'm a poor little orphan." It was extremely cold and the drifts were deep. She became caught in one of the drifts. Nell, her teacher, heard her cries and rescued her. Elsie was placed near the stove and greatly embarrassed when Nell pulled off the wet shoes which had concealed her holey socks. Her feet eventually got too warm, and she "howled." Nell told Nails not to send Elsie to school when it was so cold. Thereafter, she was told to run twice around the house to see if it were too cold to go to school.

      [The next two paragraphs were produced at the beginning and will not be reproduced here again.]

      Some time around 1900 D. C. became the proprietor of The Kamrar House in Kamrar, Iowa. Guests could stay there for $1.50 per day. The hotel letterhead gave the spelling of his name as "Welsh" rather than Welch.
             D. C. later married Columbia Anna Hain on May 20, 1911 at Des Moines. She died September 01, 1926. On September 09, 1931 he married Walterena Cole. D. C.'s family were greatly underwhelmed by his marriage record and later choices. "Annie" was quite unpopular with his family. Carmen Rushia described her as an old witch with a huge goiter whose nose and chin nearly touched. Walterena, happily, proved quite helpful to Jessie Welch in taking care of D. C. and the house in Ames.
             In his later years (1920s), D. C. Welch lived with his daughter Jessie in Ames. For glimpses of his later life, we once again turn to the Jane Blinn diary. She stayed there during the winter of 1927-1928. Through her eyes, we see him as a demanding and embittered old man who made Jessie's life far more difficult than it should have been. Jane prayed incessantly for D.C. and Jessie. Occasionally, they would all go to a church service together, and D. C. would proclaim his agreement with the pastor by uttering a loud "amen," thoroughly embarrassing his children and grandchildren if they were present.
      Edwin Rushia recalls that after D. C. had his last teeth pulled, the old gentleman tried to sooth the pain with creosol (similar to Lysol), therby greatly intensifying the pain. Jessie put in a call to sister Elsie to come to his aid.
             In his last years, he made an occasional visit to see his son Earl George Welch and family in Lexington, Kentucky. During one such visit, he wrote the story of his life (quoted earlier) in a small composition notebook. Barbara Jean Welch Mize, Earl's youngest child and only daughter, typed out a transcript of it. She remembers her grandfather as, "Rather idealistic and subject to daydreaming about what he would like to do, or thought he should do."
             Apparently, one of the things he thought he should do was provide some of his own support. Barbara Jean recalls, "he got the idea he could make hominy and sell it at a profit. A neighbor of ours had a nice warm basement they were willing for him to use, so he somehow set up his little operation there. He had to soak the shelled corn in lye to remove the hulls, then cook it and package it in mason jars. I remember eating hominy from those jars, but it is doubtful if he sold much of it. I think my father looked at this project as 'busy work' for him during a winter." Additional memories are recalled in the delightful and revealing memoir that follows. [The remembrance of Dighton Carlos Welch of Barbara Jean Welch Mize is placed under the marriage notes for D. C. and Evaline Lakin Brewer because there is not enough space here.]
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      In DCW 02, there are two obituaries. For the first one, there is no attribution:
      "In the year 1880 Mr. Welch was married to Louisa Hunefeld. In 1890, he married Eva Brewer, at Webster City, Iowa. And, in 1921, he was married at Ames Iowa, to Walterine Cole, who survives him, her home being at Miami, Florida. Five children were born to Mr. Welch, one son and four daughters, four of whom survive. They are Mrs. Elsie Rushia of Jewell, Mrs. Maude McGregor of Norway, Iowa, Mrs. Della Seamonds of Newton, Mass, and Earl G. Welch of Lexington, KY. He is also survived by 4 grandsons and 2 granddaughters; also one brother, Harvey B. Welch of Blairsburg, Iowa.
      At the time of his death, Mr. Welch was a member of Grange Glade Baptist church at Miami, Florida. He had always been known to his family and friends as a devout Christian man, always active in cooperating in the work of his church, frequently filling offices places in the church in various capacities, and always keenly and actively interested in the work of the church.
      The funeral service will be held Thursday afternoon at one-thirty at the Federated church in Jewell, Rev. C. L. Duxbury officiating. Interment will be at Webster City.
      The second obituary is from The Jewell Record, Thursday, 02 January 1936:
      D. C. Welch Died Monday Morning
      Mr. D. C. Welch, a former well-known Jewell resident, died at 4:30 o'clock Monday morning of this week at the home of his daughter, Mrs. L. O. Rushia, where he had been visiting for several weeks past. His death came from a complication of ailments incident to his old age, his health having gradually failed for some time.
      Dighton Carlos Welch was the son of Dighton and Anna Welch. He was born at Wakeman, Ohio, June 22, 1856, and died at Jewell, Iowa, December 30, 1935, at the age of 79 years, 6 months, and 8 days.
      He lived for many years in central Iowa, a few years at Huron, So. Dak., and in later years in Florida. In the past few years he spent some time at the home of his son at Lexington, Kentucky; his home recently has been at Miami, Florida. Mr. Welch and family lived for a number of years here in Jewell, his residence here being in married in Sac County, Iowa to the years 1901-1909."

  • Sources 
    1. [S1765] Welch Family Genealogy, unpublished, in files of Dale L. Lange (2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503). [DCW 01.].

    2. [S1766] D. C. Welch, obituary, The Jewell Record, January 2, 1936. [DCW 02.].

    3. [S5495] Bold Dighton Welch household, 1860 U.S. census, Huron County, Ohio, Wakeman township, Wakeman post office, page 273, dwelling 1335, family 1316; National Archives micropublication M650, roll 991. [BDW 04.].

    4. [S1769] Dighton C. Welch household, 1900 U.S. census, Wright County, Iowa, Woolstock township, ED 167, SD 3, sheet 9A, dwelling 152, family 152; National Archives micropublication T623, roll 468. [DCW 04.].

    5. [S1770] Dighton C. Welch household, 1910 U.S. census, Story County, Iowa, Washington Township, ED 201, SD 7, sheet 9A, dwelling 58, family 58; National Archives micropublication T624, roll 424. [DCW 05.].

    6. [S1771] Dighton C. Welch household, 1920 U.S. Census, Boone County, Iowa, Boone City, 5th Ward, Des Moines Township, ED 15, SD 10, sheet 5B, dwelling 108, family 114; National Archives micropublication, T625, roll, 479. [DCW 06.].

    7. [S9896] Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1930 U.S. Census, Story County, Iowa, Ames, ED 85-3, SD 9, sheet 1, dwelling 2, family 2; National Archives micropublication T626, roll, not given; FHL microfilm 2340418. [DCW 11.].

    8. [S1767] D. C. Welch, obituary, The Jewell Record, January 2, 1936. [DCW 02.].

    9. [S1768] D. C. Welch, obituary, The Jewell Record, January 2, 1936. [DCW 02.].

    10. [S9592] Dighton Carlos Welch, burial. (2012). Ancestry.com. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database online]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Memorial ID: 158173959. [DCW 08.].

    11. [S9593] Dighton Carlos Welch, death certificate. Standard Certificate of Death, State Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, State of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa. Other Information unreadable. [DCW 09.] .

    12. [S7352] Welch Family Genealogy, unpublished, in files of Dale L. Lange (2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503), p. 1. [DCW 01.].

    13. [S9539] Bold Dighton Welch-Anna Bates marriage. (2016). Ancestry.com. Ohio County Marriage Records, 1774-1993 [database online]. Lehi, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Film No.: 410259. [BDW 06.].

    14. [S9594] D.C. Welch-Louisa Hunefeld marriage.(2014). Ancestry.com Iowa, Select marriages Index, 1758-1996 [database online]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. [DCW 10.].

    15. [S7344] Welch-McKowan (Brewer) Marriage, 29 April 1890, Marriage Record Book 1A, p. 94, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [DCW 03 EEM 03.].

    16. [S7350] Welch Family Genealogy, unpublished, in files of Dale L. Lange (2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503), p. 9. [DCW 01.].

    17. [S7351] Welch Family Genealogy, unpublished, in files of Dale L. Lange (2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503), p. 9. [DCW 01.].


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