Earl George Welch

Earl George Welch[1]

Male 1892 - 1956  (64 years)

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  • Name Earl George Welch 
    Born 6 Mar 1892  Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Census 1900  Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    1900 U. S. Federal Census 
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa.       [DCW 04.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch household, 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa. [DCW 04.]
    Dighton Carlos Welch; his wife, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan Brewer Welch; their melded children: Maude, Della, Jessie, and Earl Welch.
    Census 1910  Washington Township, Story County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    1910 U. S. Federal Census 
    Dighton C. Welch household, 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Washington Township, Story County, Iowa.   [DCW 05.]
    Dighton C. Welch household, 1910 U. S. Federal Census, Washington Township, Story County, Iowa. [DCW 05.]
    Dighton C. Welch, a widower; his children:Maude, Jessie, and Earl George Welch.
    Marriage Record 24 Sep 1915  Greene, Iowa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Marriage of Earl George Welch and Harriet McCrory 
    Marriage of Earl George Welch and Harriet McCrory, 24 September 1915, Greene, Iowa County, Iowa.    [EGW 09.]
    Marriage of Earl George Welch and Harriet McCrory, 24 September 1915, Greene, Iowa County, Iowa. [EGW 09.]
    Census 1920  Athens, Ward 2, Clarke County, Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    1920 U. S. Federal Census 
    Earl George Welch household, 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Athens Ward 3, Clarke County, Georgia.   [EGW 01.]
    Earl George Welch household, 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Athens Ward 3, Clarke County, Georgia. [EGW 01.]
    Earl George Welch; his wife, Harriet A. McCrory Welch; their children: Earl G. Welch, Jr. and Willard M. Welch.
    Census 1930  District 6, Fayette County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    1930 U. S. Federal Census 
    Earl George Welch household, 1930 U. S. Federal Census, District 6 Fayette County, Kentucky.  [EGW 02.]
    Earl George Welch household, 1930 U. S. Federal Census, District 6 Fayette County, Kentucky. [EGW 02.]
    Earl George Welch; his wife, Harriet A. McCrory Welch; their children: Earl G. Welch, Jr., Willard M. Welch, and Barbara J. Welch.
    Census 1940  Fayette County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    1940 U. S. Federal Census 
    Age: Abt. 48 
    Earl George Welch household, 1940 U. S. Federal Census Fayette County, Kentucky.      [EGW 08.]
    Earl George Welch household, 1940 U. S. Federal Census Fayette County, Kentucky. [EGW 08.]
    Earl George Welch; his wife, Harriet A. McCrory Welch; their children: Earl G. Welch, Jr., Willard M. Welch, and Barbara J. Welch
    Academic Award 5 Jun 1956  Washington, D. C., Superior Service Award, Department of Agriculture Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Occupation Professor, agricultural engineer, University of Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Died 4 Nov 1956  Fayette, Lexington County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Buried 6 Nov 1956  Hillcrest Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Person ID I580  Lange Pierce
    Last Modified 29 Mar 2019 

    Father Dighton Carlos Welch,   b. 22 Jun 1856, Wakeman Township, Huron County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Dec 1935, Jewell, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Evaline Elizabeth McKowan,   b. 9 Sep 1855, Lakin's Grove, Iowa, an unincorporated village that no longer exists Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Sep 1909, Methodist Hospital, Des Moines, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married 2 Apr 1890  Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Notes 
    • DIGHTON CARLOS WELCH
      by
      Barbara Jean (Welch) Mize
      My first distinct memory of my grandfather is of being carried in his arms on the occasion of looking at an empty house which we were soon to move into. During my early childhood, the family moved twice, once when I was three (1924) and again when I was five (1927). I can't be sure which of these dates is the instance I remember, but am inclined toward the earlier one, as, at five years of age, I would have been rather a big girl to be carried around. Assuming it was in 1924, he would have been 68 years old, and apparently a fit and vigorous gentleman.
      Other memories of Grandpa Welch are harder to pin-point as to date. He came every so often to "stay with us" and these stays seem to have lasted several months at a time. On one occasion, during the Depression days of the early 30's, both he and Aunt Jessie were there for an extended stay. At this time, furniture was bought to furnish a room for Aunt Jessie. We then lived in a large frame house with two bedrooms downstairs which were given to the two of them. Aunt Jessie's room had been used only for storage, but Grandpa slept in the "back room" which had been a play room and junk room for us kids. It also had housed the family sewing machine and ironing board, so there had to have been some adjustment to make some adjustment to make room for them. I do not recall having had my things in that room afterward but kept them in my bedroom upstairs.
      Aunt Jessie evidently was out of work at that particular time, as I was aware of correspondence and conversations related to job hunting. She had a desk in her room (or a writing table of some kind) and spent a lot of time working there.
      During this sojourn, Grandpa painted the outside of the house. One day while he was painting, the eaves of what today would be the car port, the ladder slipped and fell and he was left hanging by his hands from the roof. His cries sent Aunt Jessie running to replace the ladder and let him get safely down. I was very impressed by the fact that she ran out the door and stepped or jumped off the porch without using the steps. This was perhaps as height of three feet as there were about four steps. I am sure it was a very dramatic and dangerous incident, but not much was made of it by the gown-ups, at least not in my hearing. I arrived on the scene in time to see Aunt Jessie leap off the porch and replace the ladder while Grandpa dangled about twelve or fourteen feet above the ground.
      Grandpa was a very devout Christian and was faithful in church attendance. On Sunday morning, he would be dressed and ready to leave the house before anyone else. He always had a suit, a heavy wool suit, with vest. It seems to me his trousers were always too long so they wrinkled badly at the bottom. In fact it seems as if his whole outfit was too large, as well as being quite old fashioned. On occasion he would wear spats to keep his feet warm. these were gray wool, and the only ones I ever saw worn by a "real" person. I think he wore a black derby hat. It certainly was not a fedora like Daddy wore. He had beautiful wavy white hair which was always rather long and would curl around his neck beneath the hat. He always carried a very large Bible to church. And, when we arrived would always walk clear to the front of the church and take a seat in the first or second row, although the rest of the family sat much farther back. He cupped a hand over his ear to hear the sermon better and would give a loud "Amen" from time to time. He was always a favorite of the minister, and sometimes would be asked to lead in prayer. Grandpa prayed long and emotionally, and I was fidgeting and embarrassed on such occasions as all the other kinds knew who he was.
      At home, he was an avid listener to religious programs on the radio and would sit with his Bible in his lap and his head right near the loudspeaker, following the scripture reading and joining in the singing. He also asked the Blessing before meals, whether asked to or not.
      My mother was never exactly overjoyed to have him there, but she coped with it very patiently. Since Daddy was away from home frequently because of the type of work he did, most of the coping with Grandpa took place while she was there alone with him and three growing youngsters. Looking back today from a vantage point of "maturity," I can see that it must have been a trial for her. Daddy often left home on Monday morning to return only on Friday or Saturday. During weeks that he was "in the office," he would, of course, be away from the house all morning, home for lunch, then back to the office until 5:00. So my mother had to feed him, that is Grandpa, do his laundry, clean his room and keep him company day after day. I remember her battle with the tea cups. Grandpa like to drink hot tea, which she must have made special for him. It was not a customary drink in our house. When served his cup of tea, he put sugar in, then proceeded with as generous quantity of milk so that the cup would invariably run over. Then when he drank the tea it would drip on the tablecloth, his shirt front, etc. She once said that she had tried putting less tea in the cup to start with, but no matter how small the quantity of tea, he would add milk until his cup runneth over.
      Grandpa was very sociable, fond of people, and rather naive in his perceptions of mankind. He would leave the house for a walk, be gone for hours and return with stories of how he had walked to town, met a fellow in a store, or on a street corner, or in a park, and of what a fine friend he had made and what a good time he had had. He was oblivious to the fact that Mama had been almost frantic with fear he had met with an accident, became lost or some other dreadful happening. Since our house was on the very edge of Lexington, about three miles from down town, and he was for that day an old man, I can understand her concern. He, himself, never had any doubts that he could take care of himself adequately, and do everything still that he had always done. One time he met some people from a small church of rather an off-center denomination. They were friendly to him and invited him to attend their services so cordially that he wanted to do so. The church was located at quite a distance, clear across town. I think the people offered to come for him, but Daddy would not allow that, so he had to be driven all the way to that church and then picked up afterwards. I don't believe this lasted very long. My father was aware of the unfortunate results that can come from being overly trusting of strangers and Grandpa would have been a prime target if anything shady was in the offing. At least he had no money to be cheated out of, but he could easily have given the impression that he did, as he told stories of his various business enterprises, farms he had known, places he had been, etc. This was his idea of a good time, swapping stories with whomever he met.
      As far as his fourth marriage, to Walterina, I recall that my father and his sisters were very much opposed to it. There were long distance phone calls concerning the relationship, and in the 30's that was a sure signal of important business to discuss. After the wedding (I'm not sure how long after, but it was summertime), Grandpa, Walterina and at least one relative of Walterina's, I expect her daughter, stopped in Lexington for a few days on the way to Florida. At that time, I was a very shy child and not at all comfortable with strangers, so I didn't get to know any of them at all well. I remember Walterina as being a very short lady, probably less than five feet in height.
      At some time after they had continued on to Florida, and it may have been three months, six months or long, my recall on this is nil, there was a phone call from Grandpa asking to return to Kentucky. He arrived on the bus and again stayed with us for awhile. It seems that conditions in Florida were not as he had anticipated. He and Walterina were living with her daughter and the daughter was not at all pleased to have him there. He had been made to feel very uncomfortable, to say the least, and given "rules" to which he was expected to comply--so he left Florida. As far as I know, he never lived with Walterina again, which brings up some unanswered questions in my mind. Did they stay married? What became of her? Did he ever even see her again? My impression of this whole incident is that, despite the misgivings of the rest of the family, Aunt Jessie, with whom he was living, approved of the marriage. I suppose she had no other option, as legally he was an independent adult.
      When Grandpa's final illness came, I think he was with Elsie and Lew Rushia in Jewel, and I have always thought that's were he died, but I can't be sure of this. At any rate, his death followed Aunt Jessie's so either Elsie or Maud would have been caring for him. I think this was not too long after Uncle Al McGregor suffered a nervous breakdown due to the loss of his business, and it seems unlikely that Aunt Maud would have taken on the care of her father also. My father did not attend Grandpa's funeral in Iowa. He had made the trip from Kentucky up to Ames at the time of Aunt Jessie's death, and finances in the 30's did not permit another long trip so soon. [DCW 01.]
    Family ID F241  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Harriet A. McCrory,   b. 1 Apr 1884, Greene County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Nov 1953, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Married 24 Sep 1915  Greene, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Children 
    +1. Earl G. , Jr. Welch,   b. 13 May 1916, Athens, Clark County, Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jan 1947, Buffalo, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)  [Birth]
    +2. Willard M. Welch,   b. 19 Mar 1918, Athens, Clark County, Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jul 2003, The Richwood Nursing Center, LaGrange, Oldham County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)  [Birth]
    +3. Barbara J. Welch,   b. 16 Apr 1921, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 2011, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)  [Birth]
    Last Modified 29 Mar 2019 
    Family ID F252  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Earl George Welch, Photo, 1905
    Earl George Welch, Photo, 1905

    Deighton Carlos Welch, Evaline Elizabeth McKowan Welch, and Earl George Welch, photo.
    Especially Eva Mckowan Brewer and Carl Dighton Welch; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Welch, but others as well, Prior to 1909, Photo.
    Especially Eva Mckowan Brewer and Carl Dighton Welch; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Welch, but others as well, Prior to 1909, Photo.

  • Notes 
    •        In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Earl G. Welch, the son of D. C. and Eva McKowan Brewer Welch, is living with his parents and three step-sisters (Maud, Della, and Jessie) in Woolstock Township, Wright County, Iowa. His father was born in Illinois (actually Ohio) and his mother in Iowa. He is an eight year old, white, single male. He is in school and has been in school in the past 9 months. He is not yet proficient in English. [DCW 04.]
             In 1906, Earl and his mother, Evaline McKowan Brewer Welch took a trip to visit Edward W. Brewer (most likely in Webster City, Iowa). He wrote the following poem about that visit:

      Ma's Trip

      One day last week when the weather was fine
      An invitation to see her son she could not decline
      So, to the railway station she went at once
      And in her hand she carried a bunch
      Of the finest flowers that she could take
      To a noble farmer who was no fake.

      She arrived in Kamrar just in time
      To see the end of a large fish-line
      Sticking out of the pocket of Mr. Brewer
      Then at once they commenced their wonderful tour.

      They started north a mile and a half
      And went so fast they had to laugh
      At the noble creature behind which they rode
      Who always jumped at the sight of a toad.

      When at last they came to a shady lane
      They heard someone rapping on the window pane
      Then they looked up they saw--
      The smiling face of my sister-in-law. [EGW 05.]

             In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Earl G. Brewer is an 18 year old, white, single male. He was born in Iowa of parents born in Ohio (father) and Iowa (mother). He speaks, reads, and writes English. He lives with his father and two step sisters (Maude and Jessie) in Washington Township, Story County, Iowa. He has been at school sometime since September 1, 1909. [This could mean that he has attended Iowa State College in Ames. - DLL]
      In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Earl G. Welch is a white, 27 year old male. He is married to Harriet and has two sons - Earl G., Jr., and Willard M. Welch. He lives with his family at 327 Hall Street, Athens, Ward 2, Clarke County, Georgia. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Iowa (father - actually Ohio) and Iowa (mother). He reads, writes, and speaks English. His occupation is that of professor in the agricultural college - most likely University of Georgia, working on his own account. The home of the family is owned through a mortgage. [EGW 01.]
             In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, Earl G. Welch is a 38 year old, white, married male. Earl and his wife, Harriet, and three children - two sons (Earl G., Jr., Willard M.) and a daughter (Barbara J.) live at 108 Hamilton Park, District 6, Fayette County, Kentucky. He own a home valued at $6,500; and a radio as well. He was born in Iowa of parents who were born in Ohio (father) and Iowa (mother). He is an agricultural engineer at the University of Kentucky. He was actually at work at the time of the census. He is not a veteran of any military force. [EGW 02.]
             In 1939, Earl's half sister, Mabel Brewer Pierce wrote him a letter. It is quoted below:
             "Dear Earl and family:
             I was rather disappointed when Frank decided he wanted to go south and west but next time I expect it will be to Florida. If there is another time. Just now we plan to start next Sunday - drive to Mildred's for a couple of hours and then drive on.
             Was glad to get the copy and think perhaps it is correct for Grandpa McKowan was married three times. Uncle George and Aunt Mattie were his first wife's children, mother and the baby that died, the second's and then he married the grandma McKowan that we remember. The only one of the family left is Leona unless Uncle Tom is living.
             Sunday was our wedding anniversary. Married 43 years. Must be we are getting old. Frank left for St. Paul on the Empire Builder at 5 o'clock. He hired 7 trucks from Fargo to haul his cattle to S. St. Paul. Ralph went down with the trucks but Frank thought it was too hard a trip for him. He shipped out 128 head of cattle and has most of the sheep left. We have two good men to leave here to take care of things. I am leaving Marian, the girl that was with Gladys when you were here and her cousin to take care of the house. One of the men is a cousin of hers too. Marian has been with me two years and I know I can depend on her.
             We have had a very nice winter so far. Just one blizzard and that was the Monday after Christmas and it was a bad one and so much dirt with it the men looked like darkey's when they came in. Frank took the milk to town and then called and said he would not try to come home until the weather was better. We could not see the brooder house at times. Will remember you on our trip.
      Love,

      Mabel [EGW 06.]

             In the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, Earl G. Welch is a 48 year old, white, married male. He was born in Iowa. He is not in school or college, but has finished four years of college. He lives in the same house that he lived in during 1935. His occupation is that of Farm Engineer. In the week prior to the census, he worked 40 hours. He is classed as a wage or salary worker in government work. In 1939, he worked 52 weeks. His income is $3,650. He has income from no other resources. Earl owns his own home. I is valued at %5,500. Earl lives with his wife, Harriet, and three children, Willard, Barbara, and Earl, Jr. The family lives in Fayette County, Kentucky. [EGW 08.]
             In June of 1956, Earl G. Welch was given an award by the U. S. Department of Agriculture for Superior Service. The citation for the award reads:
             "For leadership in developing needed agricultural engineering practices for the State of Kentucky and in getting these practices accepted and applied by the farmers of the state." The article goes on to say:
             "Some of the practices which Welch has promoted and seen adopted include drainage of wet land, erosion control, proper land use, 4-H water management contest, farm terracing, electric cooperatives, farm-building plan service, safe water sources, and installation of irrigation systems."
             Earl G. Welch died November 04, 1956 in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky. According to the death certificate, he was an engineer with the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Kentucky. [DLL.]
             After his death, Earl was honored by colleagues:

      IN MEMORY OF EARL WELCH
      WHEREAS: Earl Welch, a valued and respected member of the Extension staff of
      the College of Agriculture and Hom Economics of the University of
      Kentucky and a member of Alph Kappa Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Phi
      National Honorary Extension Fraternity and a Charter member of the
      Field Agents Association, died November 4, 1956. Mrs. Welch had
      rendered unusually meritorious service as Extension Engineer in
      Kentucky from March 8, 1920 until his death, where he pioneered
      in the field of drainage and terracing and worked untiringly with
      young people in 4-H Club activities, developing ideals in young
      people and promoting better relations between the people of all
      walks of life. His work in the State endeared him to all people,
      from the largest land owner to the poorest tenant farmer, and his
      work as Extension Engineer will long stand as a monument to his
      untiring effort, devotion, and loyalty to the high ideals he main-
      tained and taught his fellowmen, and
      WHEREAS: the Alpha Kappa Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Phi and the Field Agents
      organization wish to express their sympathy of its members to the
      family of Earl Welch.
      BE IT RESOLVED: that a copy of this resolution be made a part of the records
      of these organizations and that a copy be delivered to his son,
      daughter, and daughter-in-law.
      DATES: Lexington, Kentucky, November 20, 1956
      Signed by members of the committee: J.E. Humphrey
      Dorothy Threlkeld
      M. S. Garside [EGW 07.]

  • Sources 
    1. [S1772] Welch Family Genealogy, unpublished, in files of Dale L. Lange (2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503). [DCW 01.].

    2. [S1773] Welch Family Genealogy, unpublished, in files of Dale L. Lange (2315 Madre Drive NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112-2503), p. 7. [DCW 01.].

    3. [S1775] Dighton C. Welch household, 1900 U.S. census, Wright County, Iowa, Woolstock township, ED 167, SD 3, sheet 9A, dwelling 152, family 152; National Archives micropublication T623, roll 468. [DCW 04.].

    4. [S1776] Dighton C. Welch household, 1910 U.S. census, Story County, Iowa, Washington Township, ED 201, SD 7, sheet 9A, dwelling 58, family 58; National Archives micropublication T624, roll 424. [DCW 05.].

    5. [S9515] Earl George Welch-Harriet McCrory marriage. (2014). Ancestry.com Iowa Marriage Records, 1880-1940 [database online]. Lehi, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. [EGW 09.].

    6. [S1777] Earl George Welch household, 1920 U.S. Census, Clarke County, Georgia, Athens, Ward 2, ED 7, SD 8, sheet 5B, dwelling 110, family 128; National Archives micropublication T625, roll 243. [EGW 01.].

    7. [S1778] Earl G. Welch household, 1930 U.S. census, Fayette County, Kentucky, District 6, ED 27, SD 3, sheet 1A, dwelling 11, family 11; National Archives micropublication T626, roll 744. [EGW 02.].

    8. [S9514] Earl George Welch household, 1940 U. S. Census, Fayette County, Kentucky, ED 34-35, SD 6, , sheet 2A, Number of Household in Order of Visitation: 30; National Archives micropublication T627, roll m-t0627-01303. [EGW 08.].

    9. [S1781] Earl G. Welch, award 05 June 1956 from the United States Department of Agriculture, [19 September 1956] Lexington, KY, a newspaper. [EGW 04.].

    10. [S1780] Earl G. Welch, professor, agricultural engineer, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky. [I do not have any exact documentation of this matter. However, there is a September 20, 1956 article from a Lexington, KY, paper where Earl G. Welch is cited for his leadership in agricultural engineering. DLL].

    11. [S1774] Earl George Welch, death certificate no. 116-56-22592 (1956), Kentucky Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Frankfort, Kentucky. [EGW 03.].

    12. [S1779] Earl George Welch, death certificate no. 116-56-22592 (1956), Kentucky Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Frankfort, Kentucky. [EGW 03.].

    13. [S7344] Welch-McKowan (Brewer) Marriage, 29 April 1890, Marriage Record Book 1A, p. 94, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [DCW 03 EEM 03.].


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