Wilson Brewer

Wilson Brewer[1]

Male 1806 - Bef 1856  (~ 52 years)

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  • Name Wilson Brewer 
    Born Between 1804 and 1806  Probably North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Horse Sale 18 Aug 1834  Record of Estrays, 1822, 1835, New Castle, Indiana; New Castle Indiana Historical Society, 2002. Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Marriage Record 6 Apr 1837  Henry County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Wilson Brewer-Margaret Moore marriage 
    Wilson Brewer-Margaret Jane Moore marriage, 06 April 1837, Henry County, Indiana [WB 32.]
    Wilson Brewer-Margaret Jane Moore marriage, 06 April 1837, Henry County, Indiana [WB 32.]
    Census 1840  Jamestown township, Wells County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Wilson Brewer household, 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Jamestown Township, Wells County, Indiana.  [WB 28.]
    Wilson Brewer household, 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Jamestown Township, Wells County, Indiana. [WB 28.]
    Wilson Brewer; Free white persons under 20 and Free white persons - 20-49, including Wilson Brewer.
    Census 1850  Howard County, Howard Township, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Wilson Brewer household, 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Howard Township, Howard County, Indiana. [WB 06.]
    Wilson Brewer household, 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Howard Township, Howard County, Indiana. [WB 06.]
    Wilson Brewer and Family: His wife, Margaret Jane Moore Brewer; His and their children: Andrew, Benjamin Roland "Rol", Sarah, John, Julia, and Nancy.
    Pioneer 1850  Indian Territory, north central Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Settler 1850  First settler in Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Land Claim 1 Jul 1851  Department of Interior, Entry Number 6131: Southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of section 7, township 88, north, range 25, west of the fifth P.M. This was Wilson Brewer's first land claim in what became Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Census 1852  Cass Township, Polk County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Iowa State Census 
    Brewer,Wilson 1852 Iowa State Census: Cass Township, Polk County, Iowa
    Brewer,Wilson 1852 Iowa State Census: Cass Township, Polk County, Iowa
    Wilson Brewer, but also Nancy Stanley, Nathan Stanley and William O. Brewer
    Developer 1854  Newcastle, Iowa in Hamilton County Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Keeping Lodgers 1855  Newcastle, Iowa now Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Stories Between 1855 and 1956  Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa - Stories about Wilson Brewer Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Property Sold 19 Sep 1855  Lot 5, Block 7, New Castle, Webster County, Iowa to Nancy (Brewer) Stanley for $75 Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Census 1856  Iowa State Census, Boone township, Hamilton (Webster) County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Wilson Brewer household, 1856 Iowa State Census, Boone Township, Webster County, Iowa.  [WB 20.]
    Wilson Brewer household, 1856 Iowa State Census, Boone Township, Webster County, Iowa. [WB 20.]
    Wilson Brewer and Family: His wife Margaret J. Moore Brewer; His and their children: Andrew Jackson, Roland, John, Sarah, Julia, Nancy, William, and Walter.
    Died Bef 26 Dec 1856  Webster City, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    Probate 26 Dec 1856  Webster County, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    Personal Effects 9 Jan 1857  Assessment of the personal effects of Wilson Brewer by Jacob M. Funk, and A. W. Robertson Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    Estate Claims 1859  Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [19
    State of Affairs Between 1859 and 1875  Personal papers, mortgages, deeds, legal papers in disarray and looked after carelessly Find all individuals with events at this location  [20
    Probate Between 1859 and 1875  Hamilton County Court House, Probate Record 1 Find all individuals with events at this location  [21
    Legal Notice 9 Mar 1861  Hamilton Freeman, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [22
    Reburial 29 May 1897  Webster City, Hamilton County, Boone Township, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [23
    Article 1902  Summary article of Wilson Brewer's life and family Find all individuals with events at this location  [24
    Reburial Bonebright Burial Mound, Wilson Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [25
    Reburial 13 Nov 1934  From Graceland Cemetery to the site of the original Brewer cabin in Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [26
    Reburial 23 Nov 1934  A Newspaper in Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [27
    Reburial 23 Nov 1934  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [28, 29
    Buried
    The Plaque on the Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa
    The Plaque on the Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa
    Here are buried: Wilson Brewer (1804-1856); his wife, Margaret Moore Brewer (1818-1896); His Son-in-Law, Thomas Bonebright (1836-1921); His daughter, Sarah Brewer Bonebright (1836-1930); His Grandson, Frank Bonebright (1868-1934); Frank's wife, Kathryn Poe Bonebright (1873-1939); Granddaughter, Harriet Bonebright Carmichael (1861-1940)
    Find A Grave Memorial ID 104653286.
    Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, IA.
    Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, IA.
    Burial Site for Wilson Brewer (1904-1856); his wife, Margaret Moore Brewer (1818-1896); Son-in-Law, Thomas Bonebright (1836-1921); Sarah B. Bonebright, daughter (1837-1930); Frank A. Bonebright, grandson (1968-1934); Kathryn Poe Bonebright, Frank's wife (1874-1939); Harriet B. Carmichael, granddaughter (1861-1940)
    Person ID I974  Lange Pierce
    Last Modified 28 May 2019 

    Father Thomas Brewer,   b. Between 1760 and 1770, North Carolina. South Carolina, Maryland, or Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1831, Possibly Perry Township, Wayne County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Lucretia McHough,   b. Between 1766 and 1774; most likely 1766., Probably North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1855, Indiana, possibly Meritone, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 90 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married 30 Jun 1792  Duplin County North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [30
    Family ID F408  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Rhoda Stanley 
    Married 23 or 25 Jul 1830  Probably Henry County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [31, 32
    Notes 
    • Wilson Brewer was married on July 25th, 1830 to Rhoda Stanley by Miles Marshall, J. P. in Wayne county. He later lived in or near Blountsville in Henry Co., Indiana, from which place he moved during 1850-1860 possibly to a point near Webster City. Iowa. Rhoda Stanley may have been a relative of William Stanley who married Nancy Brewer. [WB 11.]
    Children 
    +1. Andrew Jackson Brewer,   b. Abt 1832, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 7 Mar 1857, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 25 years)
    +2. Benjamin Roland Brewer,   b. 20 Oct 1834, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Apr 1921, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
    +3. Sarah Jane Brewer,   b. 27 Aug 1837, Henry County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Mar 1930, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)  [Birth]
    Last Modified 5 Aug 2019 
    Family ID F407  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Margaret Jane Moore,   b. 4 Feb 1816, Preble County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Mar 1896, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Married 6 Apr 1837  Henry County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [33
    Children 
     1. John T. Brewer,   b. Abt 1839, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1856 and 1860, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 17 years)
     2. Julia Ann Brewer,   b. Abt 1844, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1860 and 1870, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 16 years)  [Birth]
     3. Nancy Brewer,   b. Abt 1849, Howard County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1856 and 1860, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 7 years)  [Birth]
     4. Leander Brewer,   b. Abt Jan 1850, Newcastle, Iowa, now Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt Aug 1850, Newcastle, Iowa, now Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 0 years)
    +5. William Granville Brewer,   b. Abt Feb 1853, Webster City, Boone Township, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN, Unkown - disappeared (See Notes) Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
     6. Walter Wilson Brewer,   b. Abt 1855, Webster City, Boone Township, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Probably Hot Springs, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
    +7. Margaret M. Brewer,   b. 20 Jun 1857, Webster City Tribune, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jan 1907, Marshalltown, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years)  [Birth]
    Photos
    Brewer, Sarah Jane
    Brewer, Sarah Jane
    Narrator of Reminiscences of Newcastle, Iowa, 1848: A History of the Founding of Webster City, Iowa. Des Moines, IA: Historical Department of Iowa, 1921 with her daughter, Harriet Bonebright Closz Carmichael.
    Wife of Thomas B. Bonebright
    Family ID F240  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Brewer, Wilson, Founder of Newcastle, later Webster City, Iowa
    Brewer, Wilson, Founder of Newcastle, later Webster City, Iowa
    Explorer, entrepreneur, settler
    Moore, Margaret Jane
    Moore, Margaret Jane
    2nd Wife of Wilson Brewer

  • Notes 
    •        There is much to know about the Wilson Brewer Family, his birth date and place, his marriage to Rhoda Stanley and Margaret Moore, the mother of some of his children (whether Rhoda or Margaret), exactly when he left Kokomo, IN, for Iowa, his real estate holdings, his personality, and his humor. The facts and the notes that are included and the questions that they raise have developed some speculation, which is also included. Some of that speculation has taken place between Dale L. Lange and Ted Crayne. Some is solely from Dale L. Lange. Some of the speculation has been cleared up and some has not. Birth dates of Wilson Brewer and Margaret Moore's children are estimates only since records in Indiana have not been sought. Other problems remain, but much more is known than in the beginning of recording information about this family. [DLL.]
             The following notes are in no particular order.
      In the Warren H. Brewer book, History of Brewer Family of North Carolina, etc., the following paragraph is about Wilson Brewer [WB 29]:
             "Wilson Brewer was married on July 25th 1830 to Rhoda Stanley by Miles Marshall, J. P. in Wayne County. He later lived in or near Blountsville in Henry Co., Indiana, from which place he moved during 1850-1860 possibly to a point near Webster City, Iowa. Rhoda Stanley may have been a relative of Wm. Stanley who married Nancy Brewer."
      Benjamin Roland ("Roll") Brewer's death certificate indicates that the birthplace of Wilson Brewer was Maryland. Other suggested birthplaces are Virginia and North Carolina. No one knows at this point. [DLL June 21, 2004.] Wilson Brewer's birth dates range from 1801 to 1814.
             Sarah Brewer, in her biography of Wilson Brewer in Appendix I of her book, p. 255, states that "Wilson Brewer was born in 1804, at Highcastle homestead on the James River in Virginia."
             It is possible that in the U.S. Federal Census of 1840 that the Wilson Brewer found in Jamestown Township, Wells County, Indiana is the same Wilson Brewer. I say that because the ages of the children and of his wife are approximately correct. There is another Wilson Brewer who is in Chatham County, North Carolina at the same time. I do not believe that the Wilson Brewer of this genealogy is that Wilson Brewer. Of course there is always the possibility of the third Wilson Brewer. However, the number of males and females of WB 28 matches those of the Wilson Brewer under consideration, and the ages also match quite well. Further, the correct number of children also matches. Two males 5 or under: Benjamin and John; 1 male 10 or under: Andrew J.; and, one female 5 or under: Sarah. The only thing disturbing is the age of the oldest male; it is underestimated at 30 or under. The age for Margaret Jane Moore is estimated correctly. However, I have also learned that census takers make mistakes and that people do not know when they were born. So, I am going to hypothesize that WB 28 is the Wilson Brewer here under consideration. [WB 28.]
             The U.S. Federal Census of 1850 of Howard Township, Howard County, Indiana taken on September 29, 1850 lists Wilson as 39 years of age, Jane (probably Margaret Jane), 38 years old, Andrew J., 18, Bolen or Benjamin Roland., 15, Sarah, 10, John T., 11, Julia, 5, and an unknown (?female?)child, 2. If, in fact, Wilson Brewer is 39 at this point, he would then have been born in 1811. [WB 06.] Yet, not even the birth year is clear.
             In the 1852 Iowa State Census, Wilson Brewer is listed in Cass Township of Polk County with four males and three females, one of which is a voter, assuming that is the head of family, Wilson himself. The total for the family is seven people. In this same census, there are other relatives: Nancy Stanley, probably the sister of Wilson, Nancy Brewer, whose husband has died in 1851, and a brother-in-law, Nathan Stanley. There is also a William O. Brewer that could be a brother to Wilson. I have other information about a William Brewer that will have to be processed before I can be sure. However, I believe this William later moved to Illinois. [WB 31 and DLL.]
             However, in the 1856 Iowa State Census for Boone Township, Hamilton (Webster) County, the record indicates that Wilson was 50 years old. While the record looks like 51, Nadine Dingman of Webster City, IA, a knowledgeable genealogist, tells me that what could look like a 1 is actually an unclosed 0 or u that census takers used to indicate a zero. If that is the case, then Wilson was 50 years old in 1856 and could have been born 1805-06. I have left the date of his birth between 1804-1806 in honor of Sarah Jane Brewers book, as well as the date on the Burial Mound in Brewer Park, but I think the date is probably closer to 1806. [DLL]
             If this is the Wilson Brewer family in the 1850 census, and I believe that it is, then Sarah Brewer-Bonebright's date of 1848 for the arrival of the Wilson Brewer family in Iowa may not necessarily be correct. On pp. one and two of their book, Sarah and Harriet indicate that the family left Kokomo, IN on September 15, 1848 and that it took six weeks to make the trip to what is now Hamilton County. In the preface to the book, Sarah herself says, p. xiv: "I make no claim for absolute accuracy in dates. Periods marking life epochs such as moving, building, births, weddings or deaths always were vividly impressed, and other incidents arrange themselves approximately in order." Thus, it is necessary to take the dates that Sarah gives with some flexibility. Actually, we can probably say that any record, even those that demonstrate great precision, need to be questioned, but some more than others.
      In the Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Hamilton and Wright Counties, Iowa, Chicago: Lewis Biographical Publishing Co, 1889, an article about Wilson Brewer says: "Willson [sic] Brewer, one of the first settlers of Hamilton County, was a native of Virginia, but when four years old his parents moved to Henry County, Indiana, where he was reared and was there married to Margaret Moore, a native of Henry County. In 1850 they came to Iowa and settled in Hamilton County, Mr. Brewer entering Government land ten miles south of the present town of Webster City. He died in 1857, leaving a widow and eleven (?) children, five of whom are living--Benjamin R., Sarah Jane, William, Walter and Margaret. Jackson, John Thomas, Julia and Nancy are deceased. Mrs. Brewer is still a resident of Webster City, where she has made her home for so many years." [WB 01.]
             In Lee's History of Hamilton County, Iowa, p. 31, the following is stated:
             SETTLERS IN 1950
             "...In the fall of 1850 Wilson Brewer and family, and a nephew, William Brewer, and William Stanley and family arrived and settled near Bone's mill, with ox teams in covered wagons. They had a large tent which they set up. Game was so plentiful that Wilson Brewer was able to bring in a fin yearling deer and the party partook of a bountiful supper of venison.
             Wilson Brewer staked out a claim just south of the mill site, and built a cabin, but soon sold to his nephew, and coming up the river, staked out a new claim within the present boundaries of Webster City. Mr. Brewer was therefore the first settler within the present limits of Webster City." [WB 02.]
             In Lee's History of Hamilton County, Iowa, p. 53, New Castle is founded:
             NEW CASTLE
             "In the fall of 1854 Wilson Brewer and Wm. Frakes laid out the town of New Castle, now part of Webster City, and began selling lots. It was located on the west side of Boone river and consisted of eight blocks, lying between Division Street and the Illinois Central R. R. and east of Superior street as now seen on the maps of Webster City. The plat was two blocks wide and four blocks long and was the second town laid out in the county.
      The laying out of this town and giving the place a name tended to bring this place into more notoriety, and homeseekers heard of it as they journeyed westward, and mad it a point to pass through on their way. Many arriving in that way being pleased with the location and surroundings concluded to stay and became permanent settlers." [WB 03.]
             In Nedra Brewer Adams' article on Edwin Wilson Brewer, she tells about the trip of Wilson Brewer and his family to Iowa: "...Wilson Brewer, together with four other families moved from Kokomo, Indiana by oxen and covered wagon. Wilson Brewer acted as leader and guide, and walked every step of the way to find the best paths around the swamps and endless sloughs. They left Indiana on September fifteenth 1848 (probably 1950) and arrived in Fort Des Moines, Iowa late in October of that same year. One of the party stayed in Fort Des Moines, lured by the cheap lots, $7.50 each, with payment a dollar a year until pair for. However, Wilson Brewer and the rest of the party continued north until they found an attractive spot on the Boone River at a site known as Bones Mill. There they built four log cabins and spent the winter.
             During the next two years the men explored the area north along the river, and in 1950, the Brewer family moved to an area near what is now the Brewer Museum. There they built a permanent log house, the first in the new town of Newcastle. Wilson chose this name because it reminded him of his boyhood home in Highcastle, Virginia.
      [NB: I have not been able to find a Highcastle, Virginia. I have found a New Castle, IN which is in Perry County. It could be that Newcastle, IA was named after New Castle, IN.]
             In the summer of 1853, Wilson Brewer sent East for his nephew Amos to come and survey the area and plot the town of Newcastle. [EWB 05.]
             There were stories about Wilson Brewer that show his character, tenacity, and humor. In Lee, (1912),The History of Hamilton County, pp. 56-57, a couple of these stories are told:
             (a)Timber Stealing
             "We must not forget to mention a matter than had been going on ever since the settlement of the county but which began to be noticed about this time and that was what would now be called stealing timber off non-residents' lands. The fact was that much of the valuable timber lands had been entered by speculators who were holding it for a high price, to buy it and as the work of improving their farms could not be carried on without timber, they helped themselves to any timber not guarded by a settler...
             A story is told of Wilson Brewer that will illustrate how this thing was carried on. An eastern speculator came out to look after his property and stopped with Mr. Brewer. The next day Mr. B. took the man out to show him his land, which was timber land.
             On the way Mr. B. pointed out a piece of timber land here that he said belonged to Mr. So and So and said Mr. A. stole the timber of that; another piece belonged to another and Mr. B. stole the timber of that; finally coming to a strip of land that had evidently been well covered with timber said: This is your land and I stole the timber off of it and if you don't like it, I'll lick the h--lout of you." The fellow said he like it and returned east disgusted and let his land go to tax deed, never again paying any more attention to it. But if one settler was found taking timber belonging to another settler, it was made exceedingly torrid for him. In relation to taking speculators' timber the settlers reasoned like this: "The improvement of our land will necessarily increase the price of the speculator's land without his doing anything; therefore it is only fair that enough of his property be put into the improvements to make him pay in part at least for the cause of the advance of the price of his land," which seemed to be good logic, if it was not law... " [WB 18.]
             (b) Another "Wilse Brewer" story:
             "There had been a shooting match and "Wilse" had won a quarter of beef. That evening, before starting home, somebody stole the beef. One Beemas Hayden was accused of taking it, and Brewer having satisfied himself that he was the culprit went to his house next morning before Hayden was up and hauled him out of bed and gave him a sound thrashing. Nothing was done with Brewer for this, but Brewer went to the office of Esquire Russell and plead guilty to assault and battery and paid a fine of $5.00 on his own motion. When the grand jury sat next, they were proceeding to indict Hayden for stealing the beef. Brewer heard of it and went before the body and said that he had chastised the man sufficiently and asked that the case be dropped and the jury dropped it." [WB 18.]
             In 1855, probably because Wilson Brewer was successful as an entrepreneur, bringing people to the area, Newcastle saw considerable growth. While there was one regular hotel, the Brewers and the Beaches (?) also kept lodgers. [WB 19.]
             The death of Wilson Brewer is detailed in Brewer-Bonebright and Bonebright-Closz, pp. 257-58, as follows:
             "The immediate cause of the death of Wilson Brewer -- Founder and promoter of Newcastle -- was the effect of a knife wound inflicted by a boastful character named Prendegast.
             A presidential election bet had been made by the two men. Father wagered a twenty dollar gold coin against an overcoat of that price. After the election of James Buchanan, my father having won the bet, called upon Prendegast, in the store of Barton and Robinson on Bank and Seneca streets to fulfill the agreement, but he refused to comply with the request.
             A dispute rose. Prendegast, who was a young man, clinched my father and bent him over the counter. With a knife, which he evidently had in readiness, the assailant stabbed his victim several times in the back at the left shoulder. The clothing was cut into shreds, but only two thrusts penetrated the flesh. The wounds were not thought to be serious; and father requested that his assailant, who had been drinking, should not be taken into custody.
             A few days elapsed. When it was found that the victim's injuries would prove fatal, Prendegast eluded the officers and fled the country.
      Wilson Brewer died in December 1856."
             Wilson Brewer did die in December 1856. While no death certificate has been located, the recommendation for the appointment of Andrew J. Brewer, his oldest son, by Margaret Brewer, as administrator of the estate took place on 26 December 1856. Wilson had to have died before this moment. [WB 24.] Andrew J. Brewer did formally accept the role of administrator on 29 December 1856. However, before much could have been done, Andrew J. himself died on March 07, 1857. The next oldest brother, Benjamin R. Brewer accepted the role of administrator, March 12, 1857. On January 09, 1857, a list of the personal effects of Wilson Brewer listed guns, cattle, horses, and pigs as personal effects.
             On March 06, 1866, Thomas B. Bonebright brought charges against B. R. Brewer of "waste and mal administration." B.R.'s response was submitted the next day, arguing that he was not guilty of either. He also resigned from being administrator of the estate of Wilson Brewer on the same day. [BRB 11.]
             The processing of Wilson Brewer's estate was complicated. In fact, it went on for years. As Sarah Brewer-Bonebright writes in REMINISCENCES OF NEWCASTLE, IOWA, p. 257:
             "My mother knew absolutely nothing of business methods. All legal papers -- land patents, deeds, mortgages and notes -- were delivered to the attorney, W. G. Berkley, and the administrator, A. J. Brewer, who died within two months. Much misunderstanding, interminable delays and technical tangles ensued and extended throughout the Civil war. The papers were carelessly looked after and father's holdings of land and personal property were dissipated in the adjustment and settlement of the estate." [WB 15.]
      One example of claims on the estate is found in WB 16. And the group of papers that I (Dale L. Lange) have copied from the records of Hamilton County Probate indicate that the process did go on for years, even to 1875. [WB 17.] The records presented here are incomplete, but demonstrate the complexity of the estate and claims against it, as well as guardianships for the minor children of Wilson Brewer.
             Another issue was the mistaken deeding of land. The Legal Notice of 1861 [WB 23] indicates that some land that Wilson Brewer sold to Johnson and Rosanna Griffith land that had been misnumbered. This misnumbered land had then been sold to a Mr. Snodgrass who in turn had sold it to A. J. Brewer. In other words, a mess had occurred that had to be straightened out. [WB 23.]
             Forty years after the death of Wilson Brewer, his remains and remains of some of his children who died shortly after him were removed to the city cemetery. Below are three newspaper articles that relate the event:
             STANHOPE MAIL, Stanhope, IA (05 June 1897):
             Recalls an Early Tragedy
             "The remains of Wilson Brewer, one of the first white men to die in this city, after a lapse of more than forty years, were removed from the original place of interment on the hillside across the Brewer's creek bridge, at the foot of South Superior street, in the city cemetery, last Saturday. the little white-fenced enclosure had become a familiar land mark, and yet few aside from the earliest settlers were aware that that lone grave contained one of the pioneers and original owners of the beautiful site upon which this city is built -- and fewer still have knowledge of the tragic story of his death. In the Fall of 1856, Wilson Brewer, then a prosperous and hardy pioneer -- a reckless, free-hearted young man, whose word was as good as his bond -- became involved in a quarrel with a blacksmith at homer and was stabbed to death. He left a widow and a large family of children, one of whom is said to have been the first white child born in Hamilton county. History and the records of the primitive courts of justice of those early days are somewhat at variance as to the punishment of his murderer, but that he was never again seen alive in this part of the country is considered ample evidence that he was speedily and summarily punished. The remains of three children, one son and two daughters, who for many years shared this lonely resting place with their father, were also taken up and re-buried in our city cemetery on Saturday." [WB 12.]
             THE FREEMAN, Webster City, IA (02 June 1897):
      "Saturday four bodies that have been buried over forty years were removed from the roadside in front of Wm. Greenwood's house to the Webster City cemetery. They were the bodies of Wilson Brewer and his three children, Nancy, Julia and John. Some pieces of the coffins were found and most of the bones were recovered and moved to the new resting place." [Julia was probably not one of these children since she appears in an 1860 U.S. Census, MJM 03.] [WB 13.]
             HAMILTON COUNTY JOURNAL, Webster City, IA (05 June 1897):
      "Saturday last the bodies of Wilson Brewer and his three children, were removed from their resting place at the south end of Superior Street and re buried in this city cemetery. Brewer was one of the first white men buried in Hamilton county and was killed in a fight at homer. History does not record the fate of his slayer, but some of the oldest inhabitants have an idea what became of him." [WB 14.]

             Two articles describe the moving of the remains of the Wilson Brewer family to what is now Brewer Park in Webster City: One article is from the Daily Freeman Journal, 23 November 1934, p. 01, columns 6 & 7, continued on p. 8, column 1 & 2, "Bodies of Brewer Family, Founders of City, Moved to Site of Old Homestead." The second, the source of which I have not been able to trace, "Remains of Eight Moved to New Spot," was probably published November 23, 1934, most likely in Webster City. They are both reproduced here.
             "Bodies of Brewer Family, Founders of City, Moved to Site of Old Homestead"
             A work of much historical import in this community has just been accomplished with the removal of the bodies of Wilson Brewer and family from Graceland cemetery and their burial on a part of the old Brewer homestead where the first log cabin was erected in what is now Webster city. The Brewer family were the first white settlers in this community and Mr. Brewer was the founder of the city.
             It was 86 years ago this month - in 1848 - that the Wilson Brewer family came from Indiana to what is now Hamilton county. The party made the trip in covered wagons drawn by ox teams and were six weeks on the road. The weather was mild, however, so the family was favored on the journey. Wilson Brewer died in December, 78 years ago in 1856.
             Found Pioneer Museum
             Four years ago Frank A. Bonebright and his sister, Mrs. Harriet Carmichael, grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Brewer, conceived the idea of founding a pioneer museum to commemorate the methods and means of living followed by the early settlers of this community. Accordingly the hewn log cabin that had been erected by Wilson Brewer in 1850 - the second log cabin he built here - and part of another hewed cabin south of Webster City built in 1854 by the Groves family were re-erected and now house many of the pioneer belongings of early settlers.
             Two years ago this grandson and granddaughter of their pioneer ancestors tendered to the city of Webster City an eight acre tract of land - a part of the original Brewer homestead - as a park in which this pioneer museum is to be perpetuated by the city forever.
             Permission to Bury There
             Along with the acceptance of the gift by the city council, permission was given for the burial of members of the Wilson Brewer family on a site overlooking Brewer's creek where the first family cabin was built. And so this week the bodies of Wilson Brewer, his wife, Margaret, three young children, and Sarah Brewer Bonebright, her husband, Thomas, and their son, Frank Bonebright, the latter of whom died last spring, have found their final resting place in the soil they all loved and revered.
             In the short time devoted to collecting materials for the cabin museum, a varied assortment of material has been gathered. Much of it is education to the younger generation. Tales of hardships and the privations of pioneers are unknown to present day young people, but they are greatly interested in hearing about them and appreciate being permitted to the implements and utensils which were in common every day use in the homes of their ancestors.
             Keep Museum Open
             After the death of Frank A. Bonebright last spring many people thought this valuable museum might be closed, but Mrs. Carmichael has assumed charge of the historical cabin and conducts all visitors about the premises any time of the day. She wishes everyone to feel as much at home there now as visitors were at the Brewer home in pioneer days.
             School children are especially interested in the fireplace and its equipment, the spinning wheel, the old stairway, a cord bed, home made tools, iron pot tripod, mill wheel of 1859, side saddle, buffalo skulls, elk antlers, mounted goose and eagle, old books, documents, flint lock rifles, pistols, grandfather's clock and so many Indian knives, axes and ornaments that they cannot be specified.
             Children visit the museum a few times and then bring their chums to whom they explain the exhibits as they would recite a lesson. So it is to be inferred that they are interested in absorbing the historical data, which is unusually interesting for it has to do with the early history of this immediate vicinity. [The remainder of the article is a verbatim quote of the death of Wilson Brewer, reproduced above.] [WB 21.]

             "Remains of Eight Moved to New Spot"
             Transferred To Sight Of Original Homestead in Memorial Park Here
             On November 13th, 1934, Mrs. Harriet Bonebright Carmichael exercised the wishes of members of her pioneer family and removed the bodies of Wilson Brewer and wife and three children; Thomas Bonebright and Sara Brewer Bonebright, his wife and Frank A. Bonebright from Graceland Cemetery to a spot on the old homestead which was formerly the site of the original Brewer cabin. This spot was prepared by a large burial mound constructed of earth which will be seeded down and further beautified by shrubbery and two hard maple trees planted - one at each side of this mound. the large nigger-head boulder which Frank A. Bonebright; in his lifetime, secured from the Bridge Mason Farm east of town, will be placed on this mound upon which will be placed a bronze tablet indicating the historical data of this family.
             Historical Data Concerning This Pioneer Family
             Wilson Brewer, Mrs. Carmichael's grandfather, came to what is now Hamilton County, in 1848 and a few years later founded the town of New Castle, now the town of Webster City. The first permanent cabin was located on the exact spot where the burial mound "The Trail's End" and the family now finds a resting place after more than eighty-five years.
             The Pioneer Museum had long been an ambition of Frank A. Bonebright in order that the methods of living by early settlers might be retained in the minds of coming generations.
             Right in 1929, Frank and his sister Harriet Bonebright Carmichael, began a more or less active effort to collect pioneer material for the purpose above mentioned.
             The pretentious hewn log cabin (1850) which originally stood at the foot of Superior street next to Brewer's Creek, but which had been removed to a farm north of town, was generously donated by the Frohling family who owned it. It was returned to the former homestead, and together with the Groves cabin (1854) brought from south of town, these cabins were re-erected for the Pioneer Museum.
             Frank and Harriet, grandson and granddaughter of the first settler in Webster City have worked hand in hand to perpetuate pioneer ideals. The growth and popularity of the gathering of relics of olden times made it necessary to provide a means of its perpetuation; so having come into possession of the homestead, they jointly offered the acreage as a park, the cabins and contents, to the city of Webster City. The fit was graciously accepted, and in recognition of the historical significance of the location and pioneer material gathered, the City Council gave permission for the family of Wilson Brewer and the donors of the park and cabins, to be buried on the premises.
             On the site of the first permanent cabin on the bank of Brewer's Creek, facing the sun, the burial mound is located, -- there are interred the remains of Wilson Brewer, his wife, three children, Sarah Brewer Bonebright and her husband and their son, F. A. Bonebright. So here in truth is "TRAIL'S END."
             The Museum Well, you should visit it. The genial Frank, who died March 5th, 1934, will not be there to welcome you, but the doors are never closed to visitors. Mrs. Carmichael is anxious to dispense the pioneer hospitality at any time; whether convenient for her or not. The register records names of visitors from all over the United States yet there are many persons from our own town who have never seen the relics housed there.
             Fireplace, cooking utensils, spinning wheels (flax and wool), side saddles, buffalo robe, collection of 50 guns, case with a mammoth tusk, twenty-thousand or many times twenty thousand years old, according to the Iowa Historical department, which was found in the Chase gravel pit.
      Indian knives, skinners, etc., found at Bone's Mill and declared to be the finest collection in Iowa that was all found in one place.
      Spear heads, arrow point, game balls, Indian ceremonial pieces, fine case of tomahawks, Indian pipes, grinders, grand-father's clock 150 years old, candle molds, candle lantern, hand-made tools, broad axes, grain cradle, flail, ox-yokes, home-made boots, wooden shoes, cord bed, ash bark bottom chair and relics and mementos of pioneer days.
             Now that active collection of pioneer relics has ceased with the passing of Frank Bonebright. Any contributions to the museum will have to be made by the owners as funds as not available for purchase of mementoes or heirlooms; still Mrs. Carmichael would be glad "to receive such and will do her best to care for them."
             It is the hope and desire of many of the citizens of this community that the Wilson Brewer Memorial Park will be completed and beautified in honor of the work and efforts of this pioneer family in giving to this community this magnificent memorial, the museum and all that this part entails. [WB 22.]
             WILSON BREWER
             The Biographical Record of Hamilton County, Iowa. New York: S. J. Clarke, 1902, pp. 619-23. [WB 27.]
             As long as Webster City stands, the name of Wilson Brewer will be known to its citizens, for he was the founder of the town and was so closely associated with its beginning and with the work of development and improvement that he well deserves to be honored, and with pleasure we present the record of his life to our readers. His history, if written in detail, would largely be an account of the pioneer experiences of this portion of the state. He was born in Virginia, in 1814 [probably not Virginia; definitely not 1814 - DLL]. His parents were of English lineage and were natives of Maryland. When he was but four years of age he accompanied the family on their removal to Indiana, and there he acquired a limited education and became familiar with all the hardships sustained in life upon the frontier. When he was old enough to begin work upon his own account, he turned his attention to farming, having become familiar with the duties of field and meadow during his early youth. He married Margaret Moore, a native of Henry county, Indiana, [possibly Preble County, Ohio - DLL] and in 1850 [this date is correct -DLL] they left their home in the Hoosier state and started for Iowa, taking up their abode in Hamilton county. The journal was made in a prairie schooner drawn by ox teams. A paper read before the Old Settler's Society, in Webster City in 1891, and dictated by Mrs. Wilson Brewer, who was then seventy-three years of age, has largely furnished us with the account of the trip and the pioneer experiences. Six families, numbering forty people, had left Indiana on the 15th of September, and on the 1st of November Mr. Brewer and his family arrived in Hamilton county. They had crossed the Mississippi River at Burlington, and during the entire trip had not crossed a single railroad. Their first stop was made at Hooks' Point, now Stratford. there Mr. Brewer took his ax, dogs and gun and footed it to what is known as the Tom Williams farm. He was pleased with the site, for it afforded opportunity for the establishment of a mill there, and when he had erected a little log cabin he brought his family to the pioneer home that he had prepared. On the way to the home he cut down a tree and caught eight coons. The following year he secured a claim and removed to what is know known as the Eyer place. He afterward removed to a claim in what was called the Creek Bottom, securing land near the present site of Webster City. Later he removed to a place now called Lawn Hill, or the old steam mill site. There he cleared a portion of land and put in a crop of corn, making his home there for one year. On the expiration of that period he returned to the Eyer place, where he remained for two years, and then took up his abode at the present old home site. He lived there until 1857, when he was called to his final rest. All kinds of wild game, including deer, elk and many representatives of the feathered tribe, were to be had in abundance. In a two days' hunt on the outskirts of what is now Webster City Mr. Brewer killed twenty-seven deer.
             On one occasion the dogs caught a deer passing the house and Mrs. Brewer took his gun and shot it. It gave one bound and fell in the doorway. On the site of the present grist mill the family also kept a fish trap in the river, which was about six feet square, and every morning they found it full of fish. All supplies had to be obtained at Fort Des Moines. Trips were made in a covered wagon to that place, Mr. Brewer usually managing to take a lot of furs and venison with him to exchange, and by this means supplied his family with the necessaries of life. On one trip he was gone thirteen days, during which time his wife and her children, the eldest a boy of fifteen years, were alone. A quilt hung at the door was the only protection against the cold and against wild animals. The latter were numerous and were often fierce. Many nights Mrs. Brewer says that she retired while the wolves were howling not ten feet from the cabin. On one occasion two of her sons started on a hunting trip and a terrific storm came on, continuing for three days. The family were greatly alarmed for the safety of the boys, but afterward it was found that they had reached camp before the storm broke. While the snow fell and the winds raged they brought their calves, pigs and chickens into the cellar in order to prevent them from freezing to death. In the winter time they wished the warm weather would come, but found that it too had its drawbacks, for the mosquitoes were so numerous that the air was almost back with them, and the men working in the fields in hot weather took mushrooms, set fire to them and wore them in their hats in order to smoke away the insects. When Mr. Brewer sought a claim they found a place which he deemed suitable for the farm, and at once felled some trees and began the erection of a log cabin. They would place a few logs in position, then would build a fire in the middle so that by the time they had the logs placed the fire would have thawed out the ground and they used the mud so obtained for the plaster of the cabin. The chimney was built of sticks and mud and the cooking was entirely done from the fireplace. When a turkey or anything of that description was roasted it was hung by a twisted string from the mantle, so that it constantly whirled round as it roasted. Coffee mills were used in grinding corn for making "Johnny cake" and wheat for bread. The first table owned by the family was made of a dry goods box, and the chairs were but rude stools, blocks being fastened into three legs. Beds were made by boring a hole in the logs of the wall in which were placed poles, there were sustained at the outer side by wooden pins. The cabins were lighted by tallow candles, or some other primitive method. The candles were made by dipping a string into the grease and when it had cooled they would dip again and again until it had become of sufficient size.
             Unto Mr. and Mrs. Brewer were born eleven children: Andrew J., the eldest, married Harriet Frakes, and after his death she became the wife of John W. Lee, who is also now deceased, while the widow resides in Webster City. She had two children by her first marriage, Albert Wilson, and Andrew J., and three sons by the second union.
      Benjamin R., the second member of the family, married Jane Frakes, and after he death he wedded her sister, Betsey, who is also now deceased. For his third wife he chose Julia Stone, who died, and later he married Nellie O'Roark. By his first marriage he had one child, Jane, the wife of George Carmichael, a resident of Woolstock, Iowa. To the second marriage came one daughter, Maggie, who married Frank Ellis. Four children were born of the third marriage, and one by the fourth.
             Sara Jane, the third member of the family of Wilson Brewer, was born in Indiana, August 27, 1839, and was married May 2, 1858 to Thomas Bonebright, who was born November 29, 1836, and their marriage was celebrated in Webster City, where they resided for a time and them removed to a farm in Wright county, Iowa, near Woolstock. There was built a log house and a poem has been written about this old log cabin by their daughter, Harriet M. Closz. There Mr. and Mrs. Bonebright lived until 1864, when they returned to Webster City, taking up their abode upon a part of the old Brewer homestead, which has since been their place of residence, where Mrs. Bonebright has been engaged in the raising of fine poultry, the place being known as the Riverside Poultry Yard, from which she has sold some very fine fowls. Mrs. Bonebright has been with the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company for the past twenty years in the construction and water supply department. Unto him and his wife have been born six children, of whom five are living: George W. Bonebright, born August 8, 1859, who was by trade a carpenter. He married Lenor Jane Meeks on the 1st of March, 1883. She died June 5, 1885, and he married Miss Katherine L. Johnson on the 24th of July, 1890. There was one child by the first marriage, Bernice Mildred, now the wife of Roy Ruilliard. By the second marriage there are found children -- Gladys, Kenneth, Myrtle I., and Arthur K.
             Harriet M. Bonebright, born February 26, 1861, in Wright county, was married May 8, 1879, to Theobald Closz, who was born April 18, 1856. They reside in Webster City, where Mr. Closz is engaged in the live stock commission business. They had one child, Inez R., born November 16, 1880, but died at the age of seven months. Mrs. Closz engaged in teaching school from the age of seventeen years until her marriage and has been a correspondent for various newspapers, being an active member of the American Press Writers' Association, also a member and the third vice president of the National Liberal Party. Mrs. Closz was a telegraph operator on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway for seven years and his wife acted as his assistant, when they removed to Chicago she learned stenography and typewriting. They resided in that city for ten years and are now living in Webster City. Mrs. Closz now devotes her entire time to literary pursuits. Wallace W., the third member of the Bonebright family was born January 25, 1863, and was married October 15, 1885, to Nettie Bolton, of Illinois, their home being now near Freeport Illinois, where they are engaged in farming. They have four children: Clarence, Roy, Harrison and William. Frank A. Bonebright, born April 16, 1868, is the only member of the family now living at the old home. He has been a member of the Iowa National Guards for over ten years, and enlisted in the Spanish-American war and during the summer of 1898 shared vicissitudes of camp life in Chickamauga park with the Fifty-second Iowa Regiment of Volunteers as corporal. After his return he was elected second lieutenant of Company C, of Webster City, which position he now holds. In 1900 he won the Iowa championship at two hundred yards on the state rifle range at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He has held for seven years the diamond company medal as well as several others for good marksmanship. He is now employed by the city in the electrical plant. Ella B. Bonebright was born February 2, 1876. She was graduated from the schools of Webster City, with the class of 1893, and taught school for three years, then went to Chicago, where she learned stenography and typewriting, returned home and entered an office, but afterward went to Des Moines, where she took a course as a professional nurse in the Drake Sanitarium. After devoting some time to this work, she was married to Myron L. Sheets, who is engaged in the real estate, loan and insurance business in Yale, Iowa.
      William Brewer, the fourth child of Wilson Brewer, married Eva McCowan, and subsequently wedded Estella Comley. By his first marriage he had two children: Mabel, the wife of Frank Pearce [sic], of Webster City, Iowa, and Edward, who married Annie Smithy, resides upon a farm in Hamilton county. Three children were born to the second union, Lulu, Myrtle, and Elva.
      Walter Wilson Brewer married Lillie Owen, and after he death he wedded Nora Johnson. The name of his present wife was Mary Burke and their home is in Hot Springs, Arkansas. By the second marriage there is one child.
             Margaret M., Born June 20, 1857, is the wife of F. L. Meeks, who is now a bridge builder and resident of Marshalltown, Iowa, and their children are Myrtle M., an expert stenographer; Carrol C., a bookkeeper, and Leroy L. Until recently Mrs. Meeks has resided on the old Brewer homestead, which still belongs to her. The children are unmarried.
             The deceased members of the Brewer family are: Jackson, John, Julia, and Nancy.
      One of the most important works which Mr. Brewer accomplished and one which will last for all time, was the establishment of Webster City. He laid out the town, calling it Newcastle, but afterward the name was changed to that by which the place is now known. It stands as a lasting monument to his memory. In politics Mr. Brewer was a Democrat, but refused to hold office, content to do his duties of citizenship without the rewards of official preferment. His wife long survived him, passing away in 1896, he remains being interred in Webster City. She was then seventy-eight years of age. She was one of the brave pioneer women who, with husbands and fathers deserve great credit for what has been accomplished in Hamilton county. After the death of her husband she was left with the care of her large family of children. Under these circumstances she did everything possible for her to do for them. Mr. Brewer had made judicious investments and at his death was the owner of considerable real estate. Mrs. Brewer lived through the period of pioneer life here, witnessed the great changes which have occurred, and saw the county take its place in the front rank among the counties of the great state. Her mind was filled with many reminiscences of frontier days and she could relate many interesting and amusing incidents concerning the methods of living at that time. Everybody was Mrs. Brewer's friend, and he worth was acknowledged throughout the county.

  • Sources 
    1. [S3079] Benjamin Roland Brewer, death certificate no. 40-01973 (16 April 1921), Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines. [BRB 01.].

    2. [S3080] Wilson Brewer, burial mound marker, Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa, photographed by Estella M. Gahala Lange, May 1999. The 1856 Iowa State Census states that Wilson Brewer was 50 years old at the time of the census. See Wilson Brewer household, 1856 Iowa State Census, residence 10, Boone twp, Hamilton (Webster) County, Iowa, p. 459. [WB 16.].

    3. [S3104] Record of Estrays, 1822, 1835, New Castle, Indiana; New Castle Indiana Historical Society, 2002. [3] A copy of this document was provided by the New Castle Historical Society on a trip in 2002.

    4. [S9600] Wilson Brewer-Margaret Moore marriage, "Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXFT-M2Y : 10 December 2017), Wilson Bresser and Margaret Moore, 06 Apr 1837; citing Henry, Indiana, United States, Marriage Registration, Indiana Commission on Public Records, Indianapolis; FHL microfilm 004170997. [WB 32.].

    5. [S3084] Wilson Brewer household, 1840 U.S. census, Wells County, Indiana, Jamestown Township, page 205; National Archives micropublication M704, roll. 98. [WB 28.].

    6. [S3085] Wilson Brewer household, 1850 U.S. census, Howard County, Indiana, Howard township, page 406, dwelling 13, family 23; National Archives micropublication M432, roll 151. [WB 06.].

    7. [S3088] Adams, Nedra Brewer. (1986). "Brewer, Edwin Wilson," 372 in The History of Hamilton County, Iowa: 1985. Dallas, TX: Curtis Media. [EWB 05.].

    8. [S3082] Lee, J. W. History Hamilton County, Iowa. Volume 1. Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, p. 31. [WB 02.].

    9. [S3087] Brewer-Bonebright, Sara, and Harriet Bonebright-Closz. (1921). Introduction to Reminiscences of Newcastle, Iowa, 1848: A History of the Founding of Webster City, Iowa. Des Moines, IA Historical Department of Iowa. [SBJ 03.] [WB 09.].

    10. [S8246] Wilson Brewer household, 1852 Iowa State Census, Polk County, Cass Township, IA_120, line 23. Ancestry.com. (2007). Iowa State Census collection, 1836-1925 [Database online]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. [WB 31.].

    11. [S3083] Lee, J. W. History Hamilton County, Iowa. Volume 1. Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, p. 53. [WB 03.].

    12. [S3099] Lee, J. W. History Hamilton County, Iowa. Volume 1. Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, p. 58. [WB 19.].

    13. [S3098] Lee, J. W. History Hamilton County, Iowa. Volume 1. Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, p. 56-57. [WB 18.].

    14. [S3101] Town Lot Deed Record, Book 1, Lot 5, Block 7, New Castle, Webster County, Iowa, p. 340. [WB 25.].

    15. [S3086] Wilson Brewer household, 1856 Iowa State Census, Boone twp, Hamilton (Webster) County, Iowa, residence 10, family 12, page 459. [WB 20.].

    16. [S3081] Brewer-Bonebright, Sara, and Harriet Bonebright-Closz. (1921). Reminiscences of Newcastle, Iowa, 1848: A History of the Founding of Webster City, Iowa. Des Moines, IA Historical Department of Iowa, p. 257. [SBJ 03.] [WB 10.] The probate papers indicate a date for appointment of an administrator of WB's will. That appointment was made on 26 December 1856. See Wilson Brewer, probate papers # 18, Webster County Genealogical Society, P. O. Box 1584, Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501-1584. [Copy of papers held at this society; found in the basement of the courthouse.] [WB 23.].

    17. [S3095] Wilson Brewer, probate papers # 18, Webster County Genealogical Society, P. O. Box 1584, Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501-1584. [Copy of papers held at this society; found in the basement of the courthouse.] [WB 24.].

    18. [S3102] Wilson Brewer, listing of personal effects by Jacob M. Funk and A. W. Robertson, attested to by H. B. Martin, J.P., January 09, 1957, Webster City, Webster County, Iowa. [WB 26.].

    19. [S3094] Wilson Brewer, Estate Claims, ("To Margaret Brewer, Sarah Bonebright, Julia Ann, Brewer, William G. Brewer, Walter W. Brewer, and Margaret Brewer..."), Benjamin R. Brewer, Administrator, January 18, 1859, published in Hamilton Freeman, Friday, 04 February 1859. [WB 16.].

    20. [S3097] Brewer-Bonebright and Brewer-Closz (1921). Reminiscenses of Newcastle, IA, p. 257. [WB 15.].

    21. [S3096] Wilson Brewer, Probate Record 1, Hamilton County, Webster City, IA, pp. 9, 10, 17-19, 23-29, 107, 110, 141, 188, 192, 200-202, 206, 306-308, 313, 280. [WB 17.].

    22. [S3100] Wilson Brewer, Legal Notice, 09 March 1861, Hamilton Freeman, Webster City, Iowa. [WB 23.].

    23. [S3089] Wilson Brewer, " Recalls an Earlier Tragedy," Stanhope Mail, Stanhope, IA, 05 June, 1897 [WB 12.]; Wilson Brewer, "Saturday four bodies...," The Freeman, Webster City, IA, 02 June 1897 [WB 13]; Wilson Brewer, "Saturday last the bodies... Hamilton County .

    24. [S3103] "Wilson Brewer, " The Biographical Record of Hamilton County, Iowa. New York: S.J. Clarke, 1902, pp. 619-23. [WB 27.].

    25. [S3090] Harriet M. Bonebright (Closz, Carmichael). Bonebright Burial Mound, December 19, 1932, Wilson Brewer Park, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [HB 05.].

    26. [S3091] "Remains of Eight Moved to New Spot," probably the Webster City Freeman, November 23, 1934.

    27. [S3092] Wilson Brewer, "Remains of Eight Moved to New Spot," unknown author, unknown source, probably a newspaper in Webster City, Iowa. [WB 22.].

    28. [S3093] Wilson Brewer, "Bodies of Brewer Family, Founders of City, Moved to Site of Old Homestead," Daily Freeman Journal, 23 November 1934, p. 1, col. 6 & 7; p. 8, col. 1 & 2. [WB 21.].

    29. [S8654] Ancestry.com U. S. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database online]. Provo, UT Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

    30. [S8664] Date supported by a number of Public Member Trees on Ancestry.com without reference. I was in Duplin County, NC, and found the marriage records for 1792 had been burned in a fire. [DLL.].

    31. [S7444] Parry, Webster. The Work of Webster Parry. np., nd., p. 454 [Typed Quaker Records.] [Located at the Henry County Historical Museum, New Castle, Indiana.] [WB 04.] See also Yount, Beverly, comp. Marriage Records: Wayne County, Indiana: March 11, 1811 to March 1860. Book B1. Richmond, IN: The compiler. [2414 NW B Street, Richmond, IN 47374.] [WB 08.] See also, Brewer, History of Brewer Family of North Carolina, p. 15. [WB 11.].

    32. [S9780] Wilson Brewer-Rhoda Stanley marriage,23 Jul 1830. (2014). Indiana Marriages, 1810-2001 [database online]. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. [WB 33.].

    33. [S7343] Copy of statement by Justice of the Peace, John Hodgson declaring that Wilson Brewer and Margaret Moore were legally joined in marriage on April 06, 1837. The copy also includes an afidavit of Nichals Bidwell (his mark) to attest that there be no reason why Wilson Brewer and Margaret Moore should not be joined in marriage. [WB 05.] See also See also, Ridler, Alice C., comp. (1979). Early Marriage Records, 1823-1839. Beach Grove, IN: The compiler, p. C-258. [WB 07.].


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