Sarah Jane Brewer

Sarah Jane Brewer[1]

Female 1837 - 1930  (92 years)

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  • Name Sarah Jane Brewer 
    Born 27 Aug 1837  Henry County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Female 
    Census 1850  Howard County, Howard Township, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Wilson Brewer household, 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Howard Township, Howard County, Indiana. [WB 06.]
    Wilson Brewer household, 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Howard Township, Howard County, Indiana. [WB 06.]
    Wilson Brewer and Family: His wife, Margaret Jane Moore Brewer; His and their children: Andrew, Benjamin Roland "Rol", Sarah, John, Julia, and Nancy.
    Census 1856  Iowa State Census, Boone township, Hamilton (Webster) County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Wilson Brewer household, 1856 Iowa State Census, Boone Township, Webster County, Iowa.  [WB 20.]
    Wilson Brewer household, 1856 Iowa State Census, Boone Township, Webster County, Iowa. [WB 20.]
    Wilson Brewer and Family: His wife Margaret J. Moore Brewer; His and their children: Andrew Jackson, Roland, John, Sarah, Julia, Nancy, William, and Walter.
    Census 1860  Vernon Township, Wright County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Census 1870  Hamilton County, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Census 1880  Hamilton County, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Census 1885  Iowa State Census, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Census 1895  Second Ward, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Census 1900  Hamilton County, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Census 1920  Hamilton County, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Newspaper Report 3 Nov 1920  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Newspaper Report 26 Aug 1921  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Newspaper Report 27 Aug 1927  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Pension Application 2 Nov 1927  Declaration for Widow's Pension - Indian Wars, Webster City, Iowa (Sent to Washington, D.C.) Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Newspaper Report 28 Aug 1928  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    Newspaper Report 30 Aug 1928  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    Newspaper Report 6 Mar 1930  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    Died 23 Mar 1930  Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [19
    Tribute 26 Mar 1930  Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [20
    Obituary 27 Mar 1930  Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [21
    Buried 28 Mar 1930  Graceland Cemetery, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [22, 23
    The Plaque on the Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa
    The Plaque on the Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa
    Here are buried: Wilson Brewer (1804-1856); his wife, Margaret Moore Brewer (1818-1896); His Son-in-Law, Thomas Bonebright (1836-1921); His daughter, Sarah Brewer Bonebright (1836-1930); His Grandson, Frank Bonebright (1868-1934); Frank's wife, Kathryn Poe Bonebright (1873-1939); Granddaughter, Harriet Bonebright Carmichael (1861-1940)
    Find A Grave Memorial ID 104653286.
    Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, IA.
    Brewer Burial Mound, Brewer Park, Webster City, IA.
    Burial Site for Wilson Brewer (1904-1856); his wife, Margaret Moore Brewer (1818-1896); Son-in-Law, Thomas Bonebright (1836-1921); Sarah B. Bonebright, daughter (1837-1930); Frank A. Bonebright, grandson (1968-1934); Kathryn Poe Bonebright, Frank's wife (1874-1939); Harriet B. Carmichael, granddaughter (1861-1940)
    Obituary Oct 1930  Annals of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [24
    Reburial Date Unknown  Bonebright Burial Mound, Wilson Brewer Park, Webster City, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I975  Lange Pierce
    Last Modified 10 Dec 2016 

    Father Wilson Brewer,   b. Between 1804 and 1806, Probably North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 26 Dec 1856, Webster City, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 52 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Rhoda Stanley 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married 23 or 25 Jul 1830  Probably Henry County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [25, 26
    Notes 
    • Wilson Brewer was married on July 25th, 1830 to Rhoda Stanley by Miles Marshall, J. P. in Wayne county. He later lived in or near Blountsville in Henry Co., Indiana, from which place he moved during 1850-1860 possibly to a point near Webster City. Iowa. Rhoda Stanley may have been a relative of William Stanley who married Nancy Brewer. [WB 11.]
    Family ID F407  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Thomas B. Bonebright,   b. 29 Sep 1836, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1921, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Marriage License 1 May 1858  Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [27
    Married 3 May 1858  Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [28
    Notes 
    • Other sources indicate that the marriage took place on May 02, 1858. The marriage record in Hamilton County Records state that the marriage took place on May 03, 1858. That date is used in this compilation. [DLL; TBB 08, SJB 08.]

    Children 
    +1. George W. Bonebright,   b. 8 Aug 1859, Probably Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Mar 1936, Possibly Arkansas, TBD Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
    +2. Harriet M. Bonebright,   b. 26 Feb 1861, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Sep 1940, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
    +3. Wallace W. Bonebright,   b. 24 Jan 1863, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1934, Freeport, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     4. Frank A. Bonebright,   b. 16 Apr 1868, Probably Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Mar 1934, Webster City, Hamilton County, Boone Township, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
     5. Adella M. Bonebright,   b. 10 Sep 1870, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Oct 1881, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 11 years)
    +6. Ella Bell Bonebright,   b. Abt 1876, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Apr 1949, Jackson County, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 73 years)
    Last Modified 20 Apr 2006 
    Family ID F409  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Brewer, Sarah Jane
    Brewer, Sarah Jane
    Narrator of Reminiscences of Newcastle, Iowa, 1848: A History of the Founding of Webster City, Iowa. Des Moines, IA: Historical Department of Iowa, 1921 with her daughter, Harriet Bonebright Closz Carmichael.
    Wife of Thomas B. Bonebright
    Brewer-Bonebright, Sarah Jane
    Brewer-Bonebright, Sarah Jane
    Later in life, probably while preparing the book with her daughter

  • Notes 
    •        In the 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Sarah is a 10 year old, white, single female, living with her parents (Jane and Wilson) in Howard Township, Howard County, Indiana. She was born in "Ohio," as were her parents (actually, North Carolina - father; Ohio - mother). She is living with three brothers (Andrew J., "Bolen," John T.) and two sisters (Julia and probably Nancy). [WB 06.]
             The 1856 Iowa State Census lists Sarah as 17 years old, living with her mother, Margaret, father, Wilson, and six other siblings. If she is 17 in 1856 (or born in 1839), this information would contradict the death certificate, which lists a specific date in 1837. [WB 20 & DLL.]
             In the 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Sarah Brewer Bonebright is a 20 year old, white, recently married female - married within a year. She is the wife of Thomas B. Bonebright, with whom she lives, and the mother of George, her son. She was born in Indiana. [TBB 13.]
             In the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Sarah Brewer Bonebright is a 29 year old, white, female, married to Thomas Bonebright. Her occupation is listed as keeping house. She was born in Indiana. With Sarah and her husband are four children, Goerge, Harriet, Wallace and Frank. [TBB 05.]
             In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Sara Brewer Bonebright is a 39 year old white female, married to Thomas B. Bonebright. Her listed occupation is that of keeping house. She was born in Indiana to parents who were born in Virginia and Indiana respectively, Wilson Brewer and Rhoda Stanley. [Wilson was probably born in North Carolina.] With Sarah and her husband, at this point are four children: George, Frank, Adella, and Ella. [TBB 05.]
             In the 1885 Iowa State Census, Sarah is a 45 year old, white, married female. Her husband is Thomas B. Bonebright. With them are living Frank and Ella B. She is living in Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. [TBB 12.]
      In the 1895 Iowa State Census, Sarah is a 54 year old, white female, married to Thomas B. Bonebright. They live in the 2nd Ward, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. With them are living two children, Frank E. and Ella B. Bonebright. [TBB 14.]
             In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Sarah Brewer Bonebright is a 61 year old, white, female who was born in Indiana in Nov. of 1838. She has been married for 40 years to Thomas B. Bonebright. Her parents were born in Virginia and Indiana, respectively, Wilson Brewer and Rhoda Stanley. [Wilson was probably born in North Carolina.] She reads, writes, and speaks English. Living with her are her husband, Thomas, a son Frank, and a granddaughter, Bernice. [TBB 06.]
             In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Sarah Brewer Bonebright is an 80 year old, white female, married to Thomas B. She speaks, reads, and writes English. She has no occupation or trade. She was born in Indiana; her father was born in Maryland (possibly North Carolina); her mother was born in Indiana. Living with her and Thomas is their son, Frank A. Bonebright and his wife, Cathryn L. [TBB 07.]
             In the Daily Freeman Journal, on 03 November 1920, the following article was printed:
             AN INTERESTING FIGURE
             Mrs. Sarah Bonebright of This City Exercises Right to Cast her Ballot
             A PIONEER SETTLER
             Realizes Political Equality of Sexes After Three Generations.
             One of the interesting figures at the voting book on election day was Mrs. Sarah Bonebright, whose father, Wilson Brewer, founded the town of New Castle, now Webster City.
             Mrs. Bonebright is a woman of phenomenal energy and endurance. she is alert, active and intensely interested in the issues of the day; she is indefatigable in the performance of her routine of daily tasks and in assisting to bear the burdens of others; she is resourceful, self-reliant, dependable and stands a splendid representative of the pioneer spirit which brought to Iowa the invincible settlers of three-quarters of a century ago.
             In a reminiscent mood, Mrs. Bonebright stated that her father's family emigrated from Indiana in 1848. They came to Hamilton county the same year that the first women's rights assembly was convened in Seneca Falls, New York, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, but she has waited nearly three generations for the opportunity to realize a legalized political equality of the sexes, the goal toward which the equal rights pioneers began their pilgrimage 72 years ago.
             The vicissitudes of the Woman Suffrage movement have been many, but its devotees tirelessly nurtured the ideal, while the western pathfinders made possible the opportunity for it expansion; its leaders voluntarily assumed the obligation of sustaining the principle of equality, while the forward-looking pioneers supplied material for its growth and prepared the field for its fruition. The efforts of one approximate the labors of the other. The frontier has forever vanished, and as a result, the accomplished work is viewed by the thronging multitudes in the genial and jovial exercise of man and woman suffrage.
             Mrs. Bonebright is a progressive along political and other lines. She is non-partisan and seeks to sift the wheat from the chaff and accept what seems to be the sound kernel of judgement, and she is in no wise averse to expressing or defending her preferences.
             Mrs. Bonebright is more than four score years of age, and she vividly recalls the changes that have taken place since her childhood. She gives an account of the evolution of transportation from the footman, the ox-team, pony express, stage coach, locomotive, trolley and flying machine. She tells of the fireplace glow, splint-torch, saucer light, tallow-dip, candle, coal oil-lamp, incandescent, arc, and search lights. She related the process of garment making from wool-washing, clipping, picking, carding, spinning, dyeing, wearing, blocking and sewing. She talks interestingly of the manifold and varied hand-made articles which have been taken from the household to the shop and the output increased a thousand fold by the use of machinery.
             She recalls the changes in news distribution from the delays of an entire season, to the monthly and weekly service, and finally to the daily post and hourly telephone, telegraph and wireless messages while you wait.
             Mrs. Bonebright has done well to exercise her right to the full franchise. The Freeman-Journal believes Hamilton county holds the age and long residence record for its pioneer woman voter, and trust she may remain with us for many, many years to come. [SJB 14.]
             In the Daily Freeman Journal, 26 August 1921, the following article was printed:
             Has Lived Here Seventy-three Years.
             Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright Celebrates her Eighty-fourth Birthday Tomorrow
             Has Lived Here Continuously Longer Than Any Other Living Woman
             "Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright, 222 Ohio street, will tomorrow celebrate her 84th birthday. Mrs. Bonebright has lived in Webster City longer than any other living woman, having lived here continuously since she was a little girl eleven years old. Seventy-three years is a long time for anyone to live in any community, and more wonderful still, to preserve an interest in the world and everything that goes on. That is true in the case of Mrs. Bonebright. It may truly be said today, that Mrs. Bonebright is eighty-four years young and beautiful, with her pink cheeks and a complexion any girl might envy, and her daily activity. Very few of the disabilities of old age have appeared for Mrs. Bonebright, which fact is partly due to her having lived rather outside the nervous, health-destroying life of little, useless things, that characterize the lives of most women.
             Her way of life has never fallen "into the scar--the yellow leaf," and with a little lessening of the heavier work of the small farm, upon which she has always lived, her daily round of duties is the same. The chickens, the ducks, geese, company, garden--these all make full days.
             A new book of her pioneer life, edited by her daughter, Mrs. Harriet Bonebright-Closz--"Pioneer Reminiscences of Webster City"--is now upon the press and is a faithful account of the early life of this city, from the beginning, and the little girl--Sarah Brewer--was here at the beginning. With her father and mother, she rode down over the brow of the hill from the south, across the creek which bears her name, following no track but the one that seemed cleared and smoothest, for there was no track. The little blue-eyed, curly-haired girl must have peeped out from the prairie schooner with wondering eyes, at the new and enchanting scene, for they were to make their home here. A long cabin soon appeared on the banks of the creek, directly back of the home she now occupies, and in this crude habitation, she helped to lay the cornerstone of the community.
      Years have come and gone, and time has lain its burdens as well as its bouquets upon Mrs. Bonebright's door stone, but the fact that she lives, enjoys, works, laughs, and is both needed and appreciated, in her community after seventy-three years of life here, is a better tribute to her graceful old age than any other. May she live many more such years in this community! [SJB 13.]
             Sarah J. Brewer-Bonebright and her daughter, Harriet Bonebright-Closz-Carmichel are the authors of the following:
             Brewer-Bonebright, Sarah J., and Harriet Bonebright-Closz. Reminiscences of Newcastle, Iowa, 1848: A History of the Founding of Webster City, Iowa. Des Moines, IA: Historical Department of Iowa, 1921. [SJB 03.] [HB 01.]
             In the Daily Freeman Journal, August 30, 1923, the following article was printed:
             87 YEARS OLD, IN GOOD HEALTH
             Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright Attributes Health to Varied Activities.
             HERE SINCE 1848
             Is Daughter of First White Settler in This Community.
             Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright yesterday celebrated her 87th birthday.
             The day was observed quietly at the family home, 222 Ohio street, which is part of the original homestead where she has lived for 75 years. Mrs. Bonebright is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Brewer, the first white settlers within the territory now embraced within the limits of Webster City. The family came to the county in 1848 in a covered wagon, drawn by oxen. Mrs. Bonebright was then twelve years of age. In 1858 she was married to Thomas Bonebright. She has lived on the site of the original homestead ever since coming west, moving only when marriage made the change necessary.
             Mrs. Bonebright is happy, handsome and hearty. She does more work in and about her home than half a dozen domestic science graduates and has also found time to write a book of reminiscences of early life in Hamilton county.
             She attributes her excellent health and length of years to almost constant out-of-doors physical activities, the mental outreach for wisdom and the combining of both into purposeful personal service. Mrs. Bonebright's present robust health indicates she may reach time's century mark, and her host of friends sincerely hope she may do so. [SJB 12.]
             In 1927, an article was published in the Daily Freeman Journal of Webster City, Iowa:
      PIONEER WOMAN IS 90 YEARS OLD
             Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright Came to This City from Indiana in 1848
             ENJOYS A BUSY LIFE
             Her Parents, Margaret and Wilson Brewer, Founded the City.
             "Instead of waiting to proununce the usual unavailing eulogy, the Freeman Journal wishes to express to the living subject of this sketch a few words of appreciation for her pioneer qualities of persistence and patience; for her courageous unswerving fidelity of purpose; for her rational, judicious common sense and for her continuous unselfish sacrifices during the long full years of her life's service.
             Today -- Aug. 27, -- marks the nintieth anniversary of the birth of Sarah Brewer-Bonebright. The only remaining survivor of the first family to locate in Webster City. This paper is happy to announce that the present health of Mrs. Bonebright gives promise that she may round out the destiny of a centenarian--an end to which she is daily contributing--for she dearly enjoys life and is never so happy as when busy mentally and physically in continuous and purposeful service. Our nonagenarian subject does much of her own housework and cooking, attends to her chickens and flowers, and entertains her many friends on long sojourns, short visits or casual calls. She resides on a part of the land originally homesteaded by Wilson Brewer, and now bearing the name--The Pioneer--where she has, this afternoon been receiving friends and cards of congratulation.
             Parents founded City.
             Mrs. Bonebright was born in Indiana. She came to Iowa in 1848 with her parents, Margaret and Wilson Brewer, who founded Webster City. She was married to Thomas Bonebright in 1858. Six children were born to them--George W., Harriet M., Wallace W., Frank A., Adella M., and Ella Bell. there have been 17 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren. Mr. Bonebright, who was a member of the Spirit Lake relief expedition, died in 1921, at the age of 85 years.
             Mrs. Bonebright has not grown old in the common acceptance of the term. She is interested in all the ideals and activities of youth; has consideration for the many mistakes of greying humanity; toleration for the foibles and frailties of age; and for all the wayfarers on life' highway she has a ready smile, sure sympathy and an understanding heart. Her book of pioneer reminiscences published in 1921, was prefaced by her friend and admirer, the late Senator C. C. Chase who said of the book--It "has a historical importance which is statewide and permanent," and also, it "could be widely used as a text and reference book in our common schools," for "never to my knowledge has the work been better done."
             Sees Many Changes.
             Mrs. Bonebright has witnessed with appreciation the phenomena changes which have taken place during the fleeting decades of her life: progress in transportation--three miles an hour with oxen, to 100 miles by airplane; communication--word by foot carriers, to invisible messages by radio; industrialism--utilization from primitive hand methods to the discoveries and inventions in mechanical power, and the wonderful evolution of political and ethical ideas. She cast her first vote for the republican candidate for president of the United States--Harding--in 1920. All these changes would require volumes to recount, and yet this grand, alert woman has kept abreast of the times and looks ahead with pleasant anticipation for further development and progress.
      The indomitable spirit of pioneers seems to be the heritage of "Granny" Bonebright for which her friends are duly thankful. All will trust she may be spared to the family and community for a long time to come.
             This pioneer upon the heights
             Of        wisdom, service, joy,
             Dispenses justice, pleasure, peace
             And love without alloy. [SJB 09.]
             Also in 1927, approximately three years prior to her death, Sara Jane Brewer-Bonebright applied for a pension related to her husband's service in Company C, Iowa Volunteers in 1857-59 relating to difficulties with Sioux Indians in northwest Iowa. She had sufficient difficulty with the application in Washington - first it was lost, then the commissioner of pensions in the Department of the Interior was exacting of information that was no longer available from Sarah. But the Adjutant-General's Office in Des Moines, Iowa and the General Accounting Office in Washington were able to come through with information that was sufficient to the granting of the pension. It was granted on May 25, 1928. [SJB 05.] See SJB 06 for full pension application and other documents.
             In 1928, The Daily Freeman Journal published another article on the birthday of Sarah Jane Brewer (Bonebright):
             MRS. BONEBRIGHT HAS 91ST BIRTHDAY
             Celebrates Day by Giving Big Chicken Dinner to Party Relatives
             Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright, Webster City's oldest pioneer, yesterday celebrated her ninth-first birthday. And as an indication that she is strong and rugged, despite her many years, it may be mentioned that she served a bounteous chicken dinner, cooked by herself, at noon to the members of her own family and near relatives residing in this vicinity.
             Mrs. Bonebright came to Webster City in 1848 [sic-1850) with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Brewer. They came from Indiana in a covered wagon. The trip, over trackless prairies, took six weeks to make. In this age it is made overland in from a day to a day and a half. this in itself, speaks volumes for the progress made by the world in the life of one woman who has lived to ben eye witness to all of it.
             Mrs. Bonebright is still active and as deeply interested in politics and world events as ever. Just now, in common with other people, her larger interest outside her family, lies in politics, on which she hold very decided views.
      Her father, Wilson Brewer, really founded Webster City. He made the first plat of the city and Mrs. Bonebright has lived for the past 80 years on practically the same plot of ground on which the first Bonebright [sic-Brewer] cabin was erected. She is the mother of six children, and there are 17 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Her husband, who was a member of the Spirit Lake relief expedition, died at the age of 85 years. She is affectionately known to a host of friends as "Granny." and all these, as well as practically all residents of this community, extend congratulations and the hope that "Granny" Bonebright may live in health and happiness to round out a full century of life." [SJB 10.]
             From and article in the Daily Freeman Journal, 06 March, 1930:
             OLD READER WRITES PAPER
             Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright Recalls Early Days of Freeman
             CAME HERE IN 1848
             "The Freeman-Journal is in receipt of a very interesting letter from Mrs. Sarah Brewer-Bonebright, who has been a reader of this paper since its establishment in 1857. She is a daughter of Wilson Brewer, founder of this city. She came to Iowa in 1848 [sic], and has lived on a part of the original homestead in the south part of town ever since the family arrived here--more than 80 years ago. She is still in love with life although her health has not been very good for several months. She sends greetings to all readers. Her letter follows:
             Editors Freeman-Journal: Your request for a report from early readers of your newspaper has been brought to my attention repeatedly during the past few weeks, so for your satisfaction and in justice to my family, I will say that I have read your publication ever since the first issue of The Freeman appeared away back in the '50s [1850s]. I hasten to inform you, however, that for a good many years we were unable to subscribe for your weekly, but we were fortunate in having obliging neighbors from whom we borrowed the paper. Among these friends were: the Prays, Stoddards, Whitseys, Johnsons, Sackets and Salisburys.
             Borrowed by Neighborhood.
             It has never been my policy in life to get something for nothing so I made a more or less effective effort to assist any or all of these parties during the season, for the kindly accommodation. A weekly errand for the small youngsters, a little later, was to make the rounds to these different domiciles and borrow the newspaper.        Occasionally, from one to all of these families had lost, mailed out or used the paper for some household purpose, in which case we had to satisfy our thirst for information by impatiently waiting another week, or by sifting for ourselves and selecting the relevant or irrelevant oral report of events.
             ...culture and superior intelligence crystallized in these activities--and although the field of the former covered only materials things and the latter extended into the spiritual realm, the exponents of these endeavors received remuneration for services in practically the same manner. I believe it is safe to state that three-quarters of payments made for subscriptions was exchange of labor in office or household, or by supplying fresh or cured meat, poultry, dairy products, garden truck, fruit or pantry stores--very little money was received for subscriptions or salaries.
             Paid With Potatoes.
             I recall that my first payment for subscription to the Freeman was made with some of the finest "Peachblow" potatoes that were ever raised in this neck-o-the-woods. Near the close of the Civil war when manpower was depleted to about its lowest point, there were plenty of garden patches lying idle and bidding for cultivation, so I procured seed potatoes from my neighbor, W. B. Pray, and planted a goodly sized plat of ground. The yield was satisfactory, and when digging time arrived I repaired to the potato field with spade, hoe, rake, and my three children aged six, four and two years respectively. the two year old was placed on a quilt inside a rail inclosure. I dug the potatoes and the six and found year olds picked up every one of the tubers. After returning the usual increase for seed potatoes to Mr. Pray, I sent four bushels of these potatoes to the Freeman office to be applied upon subscription to your paper.
             I have been delinquent many times since, but I have always managed to secure the paper to read for it has been my constant mainstay as an educator. Incidentally, my daughter, Harriet, and my son, George, began their education through the medium of the Freeman, for, long before they could read intelligently they were required to practice reading the paper aloud for the family. Did they object? They certainly did, often strenuously and sometimes tearfully, but to no purpose, as I was too busy with sewing or housework to permit a single lapse from that method of gaining information. I may say, however, the reluctance to reading aloud was more through fear of making mistakes than from obstinacy, since my daughter, Harriet has, all her life, preferred reading aloud and does so even when alone... [SJB 11.]
             From an obituary in the Webster City Freeman-Journal, undated, but probably the week of March 27, 1930 [SJB 02]:
             "Mrs. Sarah Brewer Bonebright who would have been 93 years of age next August 27, died last evening at 7:15 o'clock at her home at 222 Ohio Street. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at the Foster funeral home. The family requests that no flowers be sent.
             The passing of Mrs. Bonebright came as she herself had wished it. Without having been a burden on her family through a period of illness, she slipped quietly through the portals of death while sitting in her rocking chair. While not strong for the past six months, due to the toll taken by her advanced age, she had been up and about the house most of the time. Last evening she ate her supper as usual at the table with the family. Later she sat in her favorite chair conversing. She wished to get up and walk about and her son Frank, put his arms about her to help her up, when she slumped in his arms and was dead.
             The death of Grandma Bonebright, as she was familiarly known to a host of friends, removes the last human link that connected the present Webster City with that little band of sturdy pioneers, of whom she was one, who settled on these wild and bleak, but rich prairies away back in 1848. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Brewer who settled here in that early day when white families were few, indeed, in this wild frontier section.
             It was not until six years later, in the fall of 1854, that Mrs. Bonebright's father and William Frakes, laid out Newcastle, on the west bank of the Boone river, now the southeast portion of Webster City. Some three years later the name of the settlement was changed to Webster City.
             GREW WITH THE COMMUNITY
             Grandma Bonebright had lived through all the vicissitudes that marked the evolution and growth of the community from its wildest state to its present development. She had seen and been a part of life lived in the raw in the early days. She was always happy. She was always satisfied. She easily grew along with the development of the community. She was never a laggard. She never lived in the past, but always in the present--though her happy reminiscences of the days of the pioneer were always a source of pleasure to her hosts of friends.
             She was one of the grand women of those early days whose work and efforts were part and parcel with the development of the community. She was loved for her sweet and sunny disposition, her helpfulness to all in times of trouble and her bright and happy outlook on life. Her life was well spent, much of it, indeed, in helpfulness to others. She was a delightful woman with whom to visit. She was wholly modern and lived in the present--though always happy that she had had a part in the life of those early days when the white man was slowly establishing himself on the lands of the red man. Her life and her influence, always for good, had meant much to this community and her death breaks the last link between this modern age and those days away back when this part of Iowa was a fringe marking the westward movement of the white man.
             A LARGE FAMILY
             Sarah Brewer was married to Thomas B. Bonebright, May 2, 1858 and six children were born to them: George W., of Arkansas; Harriet Closz-Carmichael, of Webster City; Wallace W., of Bolton, Ill.; Frank A., of this city; Adella M., who died in early youth, and Ellabell Sheets, of Medford Ore.
      She had 18 grandchildren and 16 great grandchildren. Her husband, Thomas Bonebright, member of the Spirit Lake expedition and Iowa Frontier Guards preceded her in death at the age of 85 years.
             Until her last illness which began about six months ago, Mrs. Bonebright was in rugged health and did much of the family work. Moreover she was anxious to continue in such loving service. Grandma Bonebright was a bright and hospitable entertainer, as well as cheerful and highly interested in family and public affairs.
             DAUGHTER CITY'S FOUNDER.
             Born in Henry county, Ind., Aug. 27, 1837, Sarah Brewer came to Hamilton county in 1848 with her father, Wilson Brewer, who founded Webster City. She was born in a log cabin and that family custom was kept up for many years, for all of her own children first saw light in the traditional one room cabin. The trip from Indiana was made with the ox-drawn prairie schooner the story of which, together with other reminiscences of pioneering, were told by her and written by her daughter into the book, "Founding of Newcastle." Mrs. Bonebright was one of a family of 11 children. For a long time she was the only girl among them, hence much of the housework, especially the cooking fell to her lot. She had prepared meals over an open fire in the yard, roasted with hot stones and spits, worked at the fireplace and cooked on the range with wood, coal and oil as fuel.
             ALWAYS CHEERFUL
             No doubt a conservative estimate of regular, extra and special meals prepared by her would reach a total of 90,000, as strenuous an achievement and quite as necessary as the political and economic accomplishments of today. The most satisfying thought of her work is that it was done with cheerful zest and her best efforts were always freely expended for her fellows.
             Her one regret in pioneering was that in emigrating she missed the opportunities of schooling. She, however, was well informed on questions of the day for she became and inveterate reader and possessed an analytical mind and phenomenal memory. Her concern was always for others. She was generous to a fault, considerate of others and tolerant of opposing opinions and will be missed by friends and family.
             The pioneers of two generations are rapidly passing and the hold upon them is relinquished with deep regret. Their stoical persistent force of character is needed in this turbulent time of change. Too much cannot be said in praise of the benefits conferred upon the past and present generations by the early settlers of the country.
             A GRAND OLD WOMAN
             Sarah Brewer-Bonebright was a grand old woman, a typical representative of her stalwart ancestor, Wilson Brewer, pathfinder and pioneer in Hamilton county. Her work has been creditable done and as the years pass will be more clearly understood.
      Mrs. Bonebright had witnessed with appreciation the phenomenal changes which took place during the fleeing decades of her life: progress in transportation--three miles an hour with oxen, to more than 100 miles by airplane; communication--word by foot carriers, to invisible messages by radio; industrialism--utilization from primitive hand methods to the discoveries and inventions in mechanical power, and the wonderful evolution of political and ethical ideas. She cast her first vote for the republican candidate for present of the United States--Harding--in 1920. All these changes would require volumes to recount and yet this grand alert woman even in her later years kept abreast of the times and looked ahead with pleasant anticipation for further development and progress.
             The indomitable spirit of pioneers was the heritage of "Granny" Bonebright for which her friend are duly thankful."
             The following tribute to Sara Jane Brewer (Bonebright) was offered by her daughter, Harriet M. Brewer (Closz Carmichael), upon the death of her mother. It was printed in the Daily Freeman Journal on 26 March 1930, the day of Sarah's funeral.
             TRIBUTE TO AGED PIONEER
             Fine Tribute to Mrs. Bonebright Is Given by a Daughter
             FUNERAL SERVICES
             The funeral of Mrs. Sara Brewer Bonebright in this city yesterday was well attended, especially by older residents of the city. the service was short and simple, in keeping with the wishes of Mrs. Bonebright. The funeral tribute, written by Mrs. Harriet Closz Carmichael, a daughter, was read by Mrs. B. C. Mason. A cold made it impractical for Mrs. Carmichael herself to give it.
             The service was opened by the singing of "The Old Oaken Bucket" by Warren B. Dodge. Following the tribute of Mrs. Carmichael, Mr. Dodge sang "Love's Old Sweet Song." Both were favorites of Mrs. Bonebright.
             The tribute to her mother by Mrs. Carmichael follows:
             Mrs. Bonebright was the last resident member of the first family to locate in our present city of Webster City. She was born in Henry county, Indiana, Aug 27 1837, and came to Iowa with her parents, Margaret and Wilson Brewer, who founded the town of Newcastle. Sara Brewer was married to Thomas B. Bonebright May 2, 1858 and six children were born to them.
             She died March 26, 1930, at the age of 92 years and 7 months.
             Her husband preceded her in death at the age of 85 years.
             For many years I have been my mother's close companion and confidante. It was her wish that I should say6, at this final gathering, whatever appeals to me as fully and fittingly appropriate and to express, briefly, somewhat of her ideas of life and its problems.
             Realizing, however, that neither eloquence no time of space could clearly compass or properly portray the simplicity and splendor of our mother's qualities, and feeling that even to adequately outline her work, or recount the manifold and thoughtful ministrations of her life would prove a physical impossibility, I only can assume this responsibility with deep humility and hesitation.
             A Champion of Change
             Our mother was a consistent champion of change--her entire life being a full manifestation of such principles of advancement. She was an active factor in the panorama of progress from the ox-drawn prairie schooner to the palatial pullman, the motor car and the aeroplane; from flint sparking and the flintlock, to furnace fires and the machine gun; from saucer lights to the arcing luminary; from the primitive hand-hetchel to the automatic loom; from the woodman's adz to the electric lathe; from the wooden mould board to the multiple motor plow--while she watched and wondered and welcomed this rapid transition of material things, her libertarian principles were nurtured, grew and were given impetus amid the wild, wonderful and free surroundings of pioneer life.
             From early youth hardships environed and were our mother's heritage. Responsibilities gravitated to her shoulders as from some strange fascination. Finding herself in an unusually severe environment, she perforce, accepted the situation while she strove with energy and aptness to mitigate the directness of the condition and sought to minimize its degree of grimness. From such efforts many desirable returns accrued to her, for in studying the book of nature she found solace and satisfaction in the observation and application of natural law.
      Unafraid of Rigors.
             She was awed but unafraid of nature's rigors, while its calm moods cheered and charmed her; she understood as well its beauties and beatitudes as its utilities or upheavals; she was familiar with the signs and sounds of approaching storms, the expectancy that precedes the deluge and the flood, and its indications of cessation and recession. She appreciated the necessity for action and re-action, for equalization--the seeming undue quietude of preparation and the apparently opposed and destructive moods of storm movements. Likewise she knew the call of nature's creatures, whether the love note, the rallying cry of the scream of strife; whether the plaint of pain or of pleading, whether of anxiety or alarm, whether of homing happiness or distress. Quite as well she knew the growing plants, and shrubs, and trees, their habits and their needs, and in supplying them they responded splendidly to her solicitude. The sweet voiced songsters, the velvet verdure of the valleys, the many-hued and fragrant flowerets, the silvery sheen of moonlight, the misty bannerets of twilight and the soft sableness of night--all these she lived near and loved well.
             In addition to this acquired knowledge she intuitively understood the depths of feeling--the desire or despair of the men and women she met. Also, the young children and the youth recognized her as their indulgent and interested champion. Her nearness to nature's realities, therefore, reduced the possibility of supposition or belief in superstition. The ritualistic penalty of eternal punishment for unbelief was considered unworthy of contemplation, so our mother was not a follower of factions or formulas. She was at the head of the advance guard of thought and reason and of sound judgment. For herself, she sanctioned no ceremonials, but stood erect and faced an uncompromising fate with courageous fortitude. She regarded no rituals except those of pliable expansiveness and plastic reasonableness. she was uneducated in the accepted but inflexible routine of schools. Her wisdom was acquired by the sure and sane method of careful observation and experimental research. Her discriminating mind discerned the shams and makeshifts of so- called systems, and unerringly, the penetrating power of her reason selected, severally or singly, the true motive or the trite make believe of our many sided and mystifying methods.
             Her Rule of Service
             Our mother read the rune of the universe quite as accurately as the profound scholar or the passive psychometer, therefore, she realized that standing still in the scheme of movement--of change--is impossible, and so asserted that ancient beliefs must be supplanted, that the long accepted methods must be replaced by modern accessible ones; that no more can we remain in the past, religiously, than we can retrace our steps to the primitive times of pioneering. The past has pushed us forward but we cannot retain it nor return to it. Ancient concepts may well serve as inspirations, but they should not serve for imitation or repetition. To our mother's mind archaic ideas were not invested with solemnity. No system was too aged for investigation for time can confer no sacredness on existing error, so she gravitated naturally to the conclusion that inert dogma and detached dicta were entirely unworkable as constructive forces. Her rule of service was daily practicalized by extending the hand of spontaneous usefulness and unselfishness, and by liberating her love and longing and labor for the larger living and the clearer light.
             She was a steadfast and satisfying associate, for she never forgot a favor nor forsook a fellow creature. She gained and retained friends by exemplifying the spirit of friendliness. The elements of resentment were omitted from her make-up, so the unreasoning instinct for reprisal was undeveloped, and as well, the venomous quality of envy was absent from her nature. She was opulently unselfish and exercised in full measure the traits of fidelity, charity and consideration. Indelibly limned upon the luminous pages of her life was the lesson of giving with no expectation of recompense, and deeply graven on her heart in the penciling of pain was the precept that the fellowship of suffering binds closer the bonds of brotherliness. She knew that birth, and growth, and death is the trinity of existence, that one is a natural as the other and quite as necessary; so, she dealt with the prosaic practicalities of life with the matter of fact attitude which bespeaks helpfulness and happiness. The actualities of life were more important to here than belief in a promised reward. Her time was occupied with the opportunities and importunities of present surroundings. The appeal of reality was greater than that of celestial possibility. Esoteric formulae could not compare with the assurance of understanding hearts and the assistance of unwearying hands; so, the contemplation of an intangible future did not disturb her equilibrium. The world old enigma of the ages, the persistent puzzle of the past, the mystifying marvel of modern times, the perpetual seeking of the centuries for the why, the whence, and the whither of life--these speculations bothered her not at all. Her contribution to nature was a living, loving force, a vital verity, a sweet and simple service which proved its permanent effect on conduct and on character; for to do good is to be good and this method brought into relief her life's limitless beauties, its application made dismal places bright, made good visible and evil endurable.
             Mind Qualities
             Her mind qualities were earnestness, sincerity and sagacity. She treated trivial or abstruse problems with administrative foresight and solved them with the simple clarity of judicial insight, hence her home and neighboring circles were well and bountifully benefited by her understanding presence; and moreover, we, her children are proud of her achievements, pleased with her accomplishments and profoundly thankful for her appreciative ministrations. We are glad and grateful that she was permitted to main with and that we could, for so many decades, sit in the sunlight of her presence--that we could so long be blessed with the beneficence of her service--that we were able to absorb the spontaneity which flowed from her mentality and radiated from her personality. To her attunement with and appreciation of natural law we attribute her wholesome fondness for life, her firm sanity and fullness of years.
             Transition to Death
             She had lived long and well. The flower of fellowship and faithful devotion has reached its richest fruitage. Her individuality has expressed its most exalted fraternity. She has accomplished more than many widely known men and women, for notwithstanding her nonconformity, her friends were numerous and many of them were notable. The effects of her hopefulness and hospitality, her resonant resourcefulness, her untiring industry, her inspiring attitude and aspiring zeal cannot adequately be estimated, but are being manifested in the lives and labors of those who drunk from the exhaustless fountain of her wonderful wisdom.
      The enthralling cycle of existence marked by life's aggregate forces, our mother has served well in her work, but the fulfillment of destiny now make necessary the dispersion of those forces; so, the inevitable change called death has come upon her. Debilitation, disintegration, measures the weakness and division of these forces, but the law of compensation operates in unison and allows nothing to be lost. This is the inevitable and immutable process--but withal, a beautiful and beneficent one. It is the outworking of the natural, recognized and unescapable rule of the universe--although as inscrutable today as in the beginning of time. The apparently inert atoms encase in this casket will eventuate in the rebirth of other forms of life to preserve the ceaseless cycle of nature's law. This transition is the iliad of all the ages, the one eternal epic--the contemplation of which through the mists and mysteries and mistakes of the centuries has made us tolerant of the seeker after truth, although his approach to the citadel may have been delayed by indirect or divergent routes.
             Legacy to Posterity.
             Our mother's legacy to posterity is not a monument of material things, but is a priceless patrimony of love and good will and soul-inspiring service. She was beautifully physically and ideally, a combination rarely encountered. Her smile was eminently enchanting, her speech entertaining and enlightening. She was glorious in her ideal conceptions, genial...her activities, grand....and inimitable...courage and common sense...her smile did not reduce her patience or suppress her quick quaint and qualitative humor. [The text is unreadable in some lines - DLL.]
      Her active work as a personal entity is well and worthily ended, but the memory of her worth and wisdom remain for contemplation and commendation.
      And so we bow resignedly
      To nature's known decree;
      And calmly wait the fate that must
      Come soon to you and me.
             At the grave Mrs. Mason read the following poem by Harriet Closz Carmichael:

      Here, we, to nature's alchemy,
      Our mother's form now give;
      To Strike the balance of the years
      That other forms may live.

      For more than four score years and ten
      As time ticks out it's course
      She's journeyed with and helped mankind
      With calm sustaining force.

      The sweet, rich soil she loved so well,
      And charmed its fruitfulness
      Shall fold it's arms about her form
      In silent firm caress.

      The burdened bees, and flitting birds,
      Shall sing above her head,
      The tuneful requiem of change
      In time's unending tread.

      The circling planets sweep through space,
      And finite power defy;
      So, her dear dust shall help conserve
      The vital force supply. [SJB 15.]

             MacKinlay Kantor (1904-1977) grew up in Webster City, Iowa and knew Sara Jane Brewer Bonebright. Kantor is the author of Andersonville, a novel about the Civil War Prison at Andersonville in Georgia. He wrote the poem, "Granny," as a remembrance of Sara Jane.

             GRANNY
      (For Sara Brewer Bonebright, 1937-1930)
             By MacKinlay Kantor

      Carry her out in the hillside and
      fold her calloused hands.
      And drag for her the bowlder that
      rests upon her lands--
      A bowlder torn from the river.
      Her tall son dug it out
      From its cold, brown bed by the
      sandbar and the old elk's buried
      snout.

      The bones of buffalo knew it; her
      bones will know it now.
      May it shield her sleeping body as
      it shielded the bull and cow.
      And let the women who know her
      tell their babes in the shade:
      "This bowlder touches a Woman.
      This is her accolade.

      And when the cottonwoods quiver
      in breath of a dark spring night
      And the dome of the courthouse
      trembles, alone with its little
      light--
      Up from the creek of her father the
      dead will rise and walk;
      Wilson and Roll and Billy, to sit
      beside her and talk.

      They will lean their guns in the
      maples, they'll stamp on the
      dark, dead ground,
      And Granny will rise and curtsey,
      to know that she has been
      found.
      They'll tell of a hundred antlers,
      and whisper of waiting Sioux
      And she'll be ready to feed them,
      before their telling is through.

      Pasque-flower sky...they'll be going.
      Sad stars will see them tramp
      Down to the brook of the Brewers,
      down where the willows are
      damp;
      And only the dew will witness the
      tracks in a wet green chill
      Where the lean men beckoned to
      ranny, and Granny watched
      from her hill.

      Brassfield and Bell, they have faded.
      Bonebright echoed away.
      The wolves have run from the
      briars, the prairie has turned
      to hay...
      And I cry to think of an hour, in
      the crush of an aching dawn,
      When I'll go back to that cabin--
      with the last of the Brewers
      gone. [SJB 16.]

             SARAH JANE (BREWER) BONEBRIGHT was born in Henry County, Indiana, august 27, 1837, and died in Webster City, Iowa, March 26, 1930. She was with her parents, Wilson and Margaret (Moore) Brewer as they removed with their family in 1848 in covered wagons drawn by oxen to a point near where Webster City now stands. Six years later Mr. Brewer led in laying out the town of Newcastle, now Webster City. In 1858 Sarah Jane Brewer married Thomas Blackwell Bonebright, who was the year before a member of the Spirit Lake Relief expedition and was a member of the Frontier Guards. She was born in a log cabin, was one of a family of eleven children, and she and Mr. Bonebright reared six children, all of them being born in the typical one-room cabin. She and her family did their full share in the settlement and development of Hamilton County. One of her regrets was that she had had so little opportunity in youth to secure an education, her schooling having been limited to attending school for five days held in a cabin in Newcastle. However, in the later years of her life she became an inveterate reader, and possessing a clear mind, she acquired a good knowledge of general affairs. A few years before her death she was aided by her daughter, Harriet (Bonebright) Closz, in preparing and publishing, under the auspices of the Historical, Memorial and Art Department, a volume of 300 pages, founding of Newcastle, which is replete with valuable descriptions of pioneer conditions and with illustrations. [SJB 17.]

      Sarah Jane Brewer Bonebright was buried a second time in Brewer Park in Webster City, Iowa, with her father, mother, husband, and others. [Harriet M. Bonebright (Closz, Carmichael). Bonebright Burial Mound, December 19, 1932, Wilson Brewer Park, Webster City, Boone Township, Hamilton County, Iowa. HB 05.]

  • Sources 
    1. [S3105] Sara Jane (Bonebright) Brewer, death certificate no. 40-30-40, Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines. [SJB 01.].

    2. [S3106] Sara Jane (Bonebright) Brewer, death certificate no. 40-30-40, Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines. [SJB 01.].

    3. [S3109] Wilson Brewer household, 1850 U.S. census, Howard County, Indiana, Howard township, page 406, dwelling 13, family 23; National Archives micropublication M432, roll 151. [WB 06.].

    4. [S3110] Wilson Brewer household, 1856 Iowa State Census, Boone twp, Hamilton (Webster) County, Iowa, residence 10, family 12, page 459. [WB 20.].

    5. [S3111] Thomas B. Bonebright household, 1860 U.S. census, Wright County, Iowa, Vernon Township, Otisville post office, page 42, dwelling 304, family 294; National Archives micropublication M653, roll 345. [TBB 13.].

    6. [S3112] Thomas B. Bonebright household, 1870 U.S. census, Hamilton County, Iowa, town of Webster City, sheet 262, dwelling104, family 106,; National archives micropublication M593, roll 394. [TBB 02.].

    7. [S3113] Thomas B. Bonebright household, 1880 U.S. census, Hamilton County, Iowa, Boone Township, Webster City, page 213A, dwelling 115, family 117; National Archives micropublication T9, roll 342. [TBB 05.].

    8. [S3114] Thomas Bonebright household, 1885 Iowa State Census, Hamilton County, Webster City, 2nd Ward, Boone township, page 128, line 11, dwelling 113, family 128; Family History film 1021473, volume 193. [TBB 12.].

    9. [S3115] Thomas B. Bonebright household, 1895 Iowa State Census, Hamilton County, Iowa, Webster City, Boone Township, dwelling 309, family 332, p. 100. [TBB 14.].

    10. [S3116] Thomas B. Bonebright household, 1900 U.S. census, Hamilton County, Iowa, Webster City, ED100, SD 10, 40A, dwelling 115, family 18; National Archives micropublication T623, roll 435. [TBB 06.].

    11. [S3117] Thomas B. Bonebright household, 1920 U.S. census, Hamilton County, Webster City, 2nd Ward, Boone township, ED 123, SD 10, sheet 8B, dwelling 196, family 212; National Archives micropublication T625, roll 491, page 111. [TBB 07.].

    12. [S3121] Sara Jane Brewer (Bonebright), "An Interesting Figure," 03 November 1920, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa. [SJB 14.].

    13. [S3122] Sarah Jane Brewer (Bonebright), "Has Lived Her Seventy-three Years," 26 August 1921, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa. [SJB 13.].

    14. [S3123] Sara Jane Brewer (Bonebright, "Pioneer Woman Is 90 Years Old," 27 August 1927, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa. [SJB 09.].

    15. [S3118] Sara Jane Bonebright, Declaration for Widow's Pension-Indian Wars, sworn and submitted on November 02, 1927, received Pension Office, November 04, 1927; Indian Wars, Widow's Pension, no. 1956540 (Pension granted.) [SJB 05.].

    16. [S3124] Sarah Jane Brewer (Bonebright), "Mrs. Bonebright Has 91st Birthday," 28 August 1928, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [SJB 10.].

    17. [S3125] Sara Jane Brewer (Bonebright), "87 Years Old, In Good Health, 30 August 1923, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa. [SJB 12.].

    18. [S3126] Sarah Jane Brewer (Bonebright), " Old Reader Writes Paper," 06 March 1930, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa. [SJB 11.].

    19. [S3107] Sara Jane (Bonebright) Brewer, death certificate no. 40-30-40, Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines. [SJB 01.].

    20. [S3127] Sarah Jane Brewer (Bonebright), "Tribute to Aged Pioneer," 26 March 1930, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Iowa. [SJB 15.].

    21. [S3119] Sara Jane Brewer (Bonebright), Obituary, 27 March 1930, Daily Freeman Journal, Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa. [SJB 02.].

    22. [S3108] Sara Jane (Bonebright) Brewer, death certificate no. 40-30-40, Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines. [SJB 01.].

    23. [S8654] Ancestry.com U. S. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database online]. Provo, UT Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

    24. [S3120] "Sarah Brewer Bonebright obit., 1930, IA." Annals of Iowa 17 (October, 1930): 474-75. [SJB 17.].

    25. [S7444] Parry, Webster. The Work of Webster Parry. np., nd., p. 454 [Typed Quaker Records.] [Located at the Henry County Historical Museum, New Castle, Indiana.] [WB 04.] See also Yount, Beverly, comp. Marriage Records: Wayne County, Indiana: March 11, 1811 to March 1860. Book B1. Richmond, IN: The compiler. [2414 NW B Street, Richmond, IN 47374.] [WB 08.] See also, Brewer, History of Brewer Family of North Carolina, p. 15. [WB 11.].

    26. [S9780] Wilson Brewer-Rhoda Stanley marriage,23 Jul 1830. (2014). Indiana Marriages, 1810-2001 [database online]. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. [WB 33.].

    27. [S7446] Thomas B. Bonebright & Sara J. Brewer, Hamilton County Marriage Book, Page 5, Webster City, Iowa, 1858. [SJB 08 & TBB 08.].

    28. [S7445] Sara J. Brewer (Bonebright), undocumented obituary, probably the Webster City Freeman-Journal, week of Mary 27, 1930. [SJB 02.] See also W. H. Cummingham, clerk's certificate as to marriage record, Hamilton County, Webster City, Iowa, 08 February 1928. [SJB 04.] See also, Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. (2000). Iowa Marriages, 1851-1900 [database online]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com. [SJB 06.] However, Hamilton County Records indicate May 03, 1858 as the date of marriage. [TBB 08 & SJB 08.].


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